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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 18, 2004
Nine-month-old German twin girls conjoined at the head are scheduled to be separated in September by a team of doctors at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Lea and Tabea Block of Lemgo, who share multiple blood vessels between their brains, underwent a preliminary operation, in which doctors inserted tissue "expanders" under their scalps, at Hopkins last week. The expanders will help stretch the skin so the girls have enough to cover the surgical site after they are separated. Conjoined twins occur once in every 70,000 to 100,000 live births.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The infant mortality rate has dropped by 15 percent in Maryland in the past decade, but tick upward slightly in 2013, state officials reported Friday. The rate increased to 6.6 per 1,000 live births last year, up from 6.3 per 1,000 in 2012. No single cause was identified, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The main causes include low birth weight, congenital abnormalities, sudden infant death syndrome and maternal complications of pregnancy.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Infant mortality in the United States declined to a record low last year, but the gap between rates for blacks and whites is growing and is not expected to narrow in the next 15 years, the government reports.Preliminary data, disclosed yesterday by the National Center for Health Statistics, show that there were 7.9 infant deaths for every 1,000 live births in the United States in 1994, while the figures for 1993 and 1992 were 8.3 and 8.5, respectively.The rate first fell below 12 per 1,000 in 1981.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
After moving aggressively in recent years to make a dent in Maryland's stubbornly high infant mortality rate, city and state officials plan to announce Wednesday a significant drop, to the lowest level on record. Data from the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene show a drop to 6.7 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2010. That's a 7 percent drop from the year before, a 16 percent drop from two years before and the lowest rate since recording began in the 1940s. "It's definitely going in the right direction," said Frances B. Phillips, deputy secretary of the state health department.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- As a people, Americans are living longer, smoking less, spending more money on books, newspapers and magazines. Fewer are owning guns and are less likely to get a divorce. They are even eating more broccoli.These are some of the highlights of the 1994 Statistical Abstract of the United States, a potpourri of factoids compiled by the Census Bureau. The report, published annually since 1878, provides a snapshot of changes in U.S. life over a period of 20 or 30 years or more.Coming in a political season in which candidates of both the left and the right are focusing on America's shortcomings, it is a portrait of a nation that is remarkably healthy.
NEWS
April 26, 1995
THE Annie E. Casey Foundation's sixth annual "Kids Count Data Book" is out, bringing more reasons for concern about American children -- as well as a couple of rays of good news.Nationally, the proportion of low birth-weight babies has increased by 5 percent since 1985. However, during the same period, the nation's infant mortality rate -- children who die before their first birthday -- declined by 20 percent, from 10.6 deaths per 1,000 live births to 8.5 in 1992. Maryland, which at 9.8 deaths per 1,000 live births ranks slightly worse than the national average in infant mortality, experienced an 18 percent decline between 1985 and 1992.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff | September 29, 1995
Maryland's infant mortality rate, for many years among the worst in the nation, fell 11 percent last year to a record low.The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which released new figures yesterday, credited programs that have discouraged teen-age pregnancy, ushered low-income women into prenatal care, and raised awareness of sudden infant death syndrome."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The infant mortality rate has dropped by 15 percent in Maryland in the past decade, but tick upward slightly in 2013, state officials reported Friday. The rate increased to 6.6 per 1,000 live births last year, up from 6.3 per 1,000 in 2012. No single cause was identified, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The main causes include low birth weight, congenital abnormalities, sudden infant death syndrome and maternal complications of pregnancy.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | February 19, 1991
Baltimore has achieved the dubious distinction of having the worst infant mortality rate for white babies in cities with a population more than 500,000, according to a new report from the Children's Defense Fund.For all races, Baltimore ranks third in infant mortality compared with other cities its size. It is in seventh place for infant mortality of black babies.The ranking comes from a Children's Defense Fund report, "Maternal and Child Health in America's Cities," which analyzes data from 1987, the latest year for which statistics are available.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE Sun staff writer Jonathan Bor contributed to this article | December 4, 1998
After years of substantial declines, the number of abortions performed in the United States increased very slightly in 1996, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.There were 1,221,585 abortions reported to the CDC in 1996, a 0.9 percent increase from the 1,210,883 reported in 1995 -- but still 15 percent below the 1,429,577 peak reported in 1990.The abortion ratio also rose slightly, to 314 from 311 for every 1,000 live births, in part because the number of live births was a little lower.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
As a single mom struggling to navigate the work-life juggle, Tynesha Ross found herself cutting corners at dinner time. After work and exhausted, she'd make a beeline for McDonald's. Happy meals for her two kids, a value meal for her. Home. Eat. Homework. Bed. The ease of the routine bumped up against the reality of her poor health. Overweight and unhappy, she began going to weekly Weight Watchers meetings at the community nonprofit DRU/Mondawmin Healthy Families, where she learned shortcuts for making healthy food.
NEWS
By Jennifer Block | October 24, 2007
Preterm births are on the rise. Nearly one-third of women have major abdominal surgery to give birth. Compared with other industrialized countries, the United States ranks second-to-last in infant survival. For years, these numbers have suggested something is terribly amiss in delivery wards. Now there is even more compelling evidence that the U.S. maternity care system is failing: For the first time in decades, the number of women dying in childbirth has increased. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released 2004 data showing a rate of 13.1 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Chris Guy and Gadi Dechter and Chris Guy,Sun reporters | September 21, 2007
A pathologist who examined skeletal infant remains found at Christy Lynn Freeman's Ocean City home concluded there was no way to tell if the babies had been born alive, the medical examiner's office said yesterday. The pathologist's testimony this week before a Worcester County grand jury was a key factor in the panel's decision not to indict Freeman on murder charges, the county state's attorney said. "In a homicide investigation, you have to prove that the victim had lived," State's Attorney Joel J. Todd said at a news conference in the county office building in Snow Hill.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 18, 2004
Nine-month-old German twin girls conjoined at the head are scheduled to be separated in September by a team of doctors at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Lea and Tabea Block of Lemgo, who share multiple blood vessels between their brains, underwent a preliminary operation, in which doctors inserted tissue "expanders" under their scalps, at Hopkins last week. The expanders will help stretch the skin so the girls have enough to cover the surgical site after they are separated. Conjoined twins occur once in every 70,000 to 100,000 live births.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | December 11, 1999
SEATTLE -- University of Washington physicians have removed and frozen an ovary from a 14-year-old leukemia patient to protect her fertility against chemotherapy.This week, they began offering the technology to other patients needing one of a variety of treatments that damage the ovaries.Years from now, pieces of the ovarian tissue, containing thousands of eggs, may be thawed and returned to the patient's body. Mature eggs would be removed for laboratory fertilization and reimplanted in her body, should she wish to have children.
TOPIC
By Barbara Becker | October 10, 1999
On Tuesday, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan will announce that the 6 billionth baby has been born in this world. As a pregnant American woman, I'm getting mixed messages about how I should feel about contributing another human being to this planet.Some would have me believe that how many children a woman should have is an issue only for women in developing countries, who are viewed as reproducing in unprecedented numbers. But I don't buy that. Americans, along with the other 1 billion wealthiest people on the planet, help consume 80 percent of the resources.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | October 24, 1992
Maryland corporations could save themselves millions of dollars in health-care costs by getting involved in the fight against infant mortality, business leaders were told yesterday at the state's first conference on the issue.About 11 of every 1,000 babies born in Maryland die before their first birthday -- a rate slightly higher than the national average. Countless others born with health problems may survive only because of extraordinary medical attention. The cost, business leaders were told, is staggering:* In 1991, Maryland employers spent almost $30 million to cover uncompensated health-care costs for mothers and their babies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE Sun staff writer Jonathan Bor contributed to this article | December 4, 1998
After years of substantial declines, the number of abortions performed in the United States increased very slightly in 1996, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.There were 1,221,585 abortions reported to the CDC in 1996, a 0.9 percent increase from the 1,210,883 reported in 1995 -- but still 15 percent below the 1,429,577 peak reported in 1990.The abortion ratio also rose slightly, to 314 from 311 for every 1,000 live births, in part because the number of live births was a little lower.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
Couples stood roughly a 1-in-5 chance in 1995 of taking home a baby each time they attempted in-vitro fertilization and other high-tech methods of overcoming infertility, according to a federal report released yesterday.The report is the first giving consumers a way to evaluate a clinic's track record. It was prepared by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and two organizations representing fertility doctors and consumers."For many couples, the dream of having a child is not easily realized," said Dr. Lynn Wilcox, director of the CDC's Division of Reproductive Health.
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