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Liv Tyler

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By Bruce Newman and Bruce Newman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 1996
In the absence of an official count, it can only be stated as a theory that Liv Tyler has two more teeth than God gave Burt Lancaster. She possesses the most endearing overbite seen in Hollywood since Gene Tierney. Whether Tyler, the 18-year-old star of Bernardo Bertolucci's "Stealing Beauty" and the low-budget "Heavy," has actually heard of any of these people is another matter.Tyler is cool. She has cool. Before a camera, however, her temperature runs several degrees above normal, these changes passing like a progression of seasons across her face, each with its own light.
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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 21, 2008
Starring Edward Norton, Liv Tyler, William Hurt. Directed by Louis Leterrier Released by Universal Home Video $29.98 (blu-ray, $39.98) *** DVDS A definitive movie version of The Incredible Hulk has yet to be made, but at least this go-round, with Maryland's Edward Norton as the big guy, has it all over the existentialist exercise in what it means to be big, mean, green and angry that was Ang Lee's 2003 version. The squabbles between Norton and director Louis Leterrier are legion; apparently, Norton wanted more of a thinking-man's Hulk than Leterrier (or the folks at Marvel Comics)
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FEATURES
By Jay Carr and Jay Carr,BOSTON GLOBE | April 5, 1997
One almost hesitates to bestow upon "Inventing the Abbotts" the praise it deserves for fear of engendering wrong expectations. The appeal of this beautifully textured and strongly felt film is that it's an anti-blockbuster. Although it's set in 1957, it treats the period in refreshingly clear-eyed fashion. There's no XTC nostalgia in it, no sentimentalizing, no hindsight. It's so true to its period that it plays like a film made in 1957.Intimate in focus and structure, it's built on beautifully observed accretions of emotion and behavioral detail.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 13, 2008
You wouldn't like me when I'm hungry," says Bruce Banner (Edward Norton) near the start of The Incredible Hulk, comically mangling a signature line as he tries to speak Portuguese to some menacing co-workers at a soft-drink bottling plant in Brazil. Of course, comic-book fans love the Hulk when he's angry - and love a franchise when they feel it's hungry for success, which the Hulk movie series now officially is. After sanctioning the turgid 2003 Ang Lee version of the myth (simply called The Hulk)
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Like a child who breaks a lamp, then finger-paints the best refrigerator picture ever, so does the new film "Plunkett & MacLeane" walk the fine line between frustrating and lovable.There aren't many movies that would attempt to set the story of an 18th-century pair of highwaymen against a modern musical sensibility, and "Plunkett & MacLeane," while largely entertaining, doesn't always succeed.In fact, the first 30 minutes are a waste, literally and figuratively, as the movie plays to the lowest common denominator, with sex, gore, grave robbing and a little defecation thrown in for good measure.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 21, 2008
Starring Edward Norton, Liv Tyler, William Hurt. Directed by Louis Leterrier Released by Universal Home Video $29.98 (blu-ray, $39.98) *** DVDS A definitive movie version of The Incredible Hulk has yet to be made, but at least this go-round, with Maryland's Edward Norton as the big guy, has it all over the existentialist exercise in what it means to be big, mean, green and angry that was Ang Lee's 2003 version. The squabbles between Norton and director Louis Leterrier are legion; apparently, Norton wanted more of a thinking-man's Hulk than Leterrier (or the folks at Marvel Comics)
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2000
"Onegin" is an elegantly wrought, deeply felt film based on Alexander Pushkin's 1831 novel in verse, which in turn inspired Tchaikovsky's 1879 opera. The very model of a literary adaptation to the screen, it stars a perfectly cast Ralph Fiennes and marks a remarkably assured feature directorial debut for Fiennes' sister, Martha, and also a splendid opportunity for their brother Magnus, who composed the film's spare yet evocative score. As a period piece the film is breathtaking in its beauty and authenticity, its production design a work of symbolically decayed grandeur.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1996
"That Thing You Do" is corny, slight and entirely too cute to be real -- but it's everything you want a one-hit wonder to be.The movie is a happy, engaging story about a one-hit wonder, the Wonders, directed and written by that many-hit wonder Tom Hanks.His first directing bout is a funny, frothy look at a little band from Erie, Pa., that hits it big with a single called "That Thing You Do." That's the whole story. It won't change your life, but it's lovable.Heading the list of attractive young stars in this flick is Tom Everett Scott as the smart and charming Guy, whose work in his dad's appliance store doesn't keep him from practicing on his drum set in the basement for hours each night, playing along with his favorite jazz records.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 13, 2008
You wouldn't like me when I'm hungry," says Bruce Banner (Edward Norton) near the start of The Incredible Hulk, comically mangling a signature line as he tries to speak Portuguese to some menacing co-workers at a soft-drink bottling plant in Brazil. Of course, comic-book fans love the Hulk when he's angry - and love a franchise when they feel it's hungry for success, which the Hulk movie series now officially is. After sanctioning the turgid 2003 Ang Lee version of the myth (simply called The Hulk)
BUSINESS
By Alana Semuels and Alana Semuels,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 2, 2007
Anyone who has ever tried to win an online contest could learn something from Adrian Piccardi. Piccardi, a 20-year-old freelance movie editor, has netted $23,000 in the past eight months by taking first place in three best-video competitions, campaigning by giving away beer and reaching out to more than 100,000 "friends" on MySpace for votes. He is a marketer's dream. By going to extraordinary lengths to persuade people to cast ballots in online contests, Piccardi has sent hundreds, even thousands, of users to Web sites that are trying to sell something.
BUSINESS
By Alana Semuels and Alana Semuels,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 2, 2007
Anyone who has ever tried to win an online contest could learn something from Adrian Piccardi. Piccardi, a 20-year-old freelance movie editor, has netted $23,000 in the past eight months by taking first place in three best-video competitions, campaigning by giving away beer and reaching out to more than 100,000 "friends" on MySpace for votes. He is a marketer's dream. By going to extraordinary lengths to persuade people to cast ballots in online contests, Piccardi has sent hundreds, even thousands, of users to Web sites that are trying to sell something.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2000
"Onegin" is an elegantly wrought, deeply felt film based on Alexander Pushkin's 1831 novel in verse, which in turn inspired Tchaikovsky's 1879 opera. The very model of a literary adaptation to the screen, it stars a perfectly cast Ralph Fiennes and marks a remarkably assured feature directorial debut for Fiennes' sister, Martha, and also a splendid opportunity for their brother Magnus, who composed the film's spare yet evocative score. As a period piece the film is breathtaking in its beauty and authenticity, its production design a work of symbolically decayed grandeur.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Like a child who breaks a lamp, then finger-paints the best refrigerator picture ever, so does the new film "Plunkett & MacLeane" walk the fine line between frustrating and lovable.There aren't many movies that would attempt to set the story of an 18th-century pair of highwaymen against a modern musical sensibility, and "Plunkett & MacLeane," while largely entertaining, doesn't always succeed.In fact, the first 30 minutes are a waste, literally and figuratively, as the movie plays to the lowest common denominator, with sex, gore, grave robbing and a little defecation thrown in for good measure.
FEATURES
By Jay Carr and Jay Carr,BOSTON GLOBE | April 5, 1997
One almost hesitates to bestow upon "Inventing the Abbotts" the praise it deserves for fear of engendering wrong expectations. The appeal of this beautifully textured and strongly felt film is that it's an anti-blockbuster. Although it's set in 1957, it treats the period in refreshingly clear-eyed fashion. There's no XTC nostalgia in it, no sentimentalizing, no hindsight. It's so true to its period that it plays like a film made in 1957.Intimate in focus and structure, it's built on beautifully observed accretions of emotion and behavioral detail.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1996
"That Thing You Do" is corny, slight and entirely too cute to be real -- but it's everything you want a one-hit wonder to be.The movie is a happy, engaging story about a one-hit wonder, the Wonders, directed and written by that many-hit wonder Tom Hanks.His first directing bout is a funny, frothy look at a little band from Erie, Pa., that hits it big with a single called "That Thing You Do." That's the whole story. It won't change your life, but it's lovable.Heading the list of attractive young stars in this flick is Tom Everett Scott as the smart and charming Guy, whose work in his dad's appliance store doesn't keep him from practicing on his drum set in the basement for hours each night, playing along with his favorite jazz records.
NEWS
By Bruce Newman and Bruce Newman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 1996
In the absence of an official count, it can only be stated as a theory that Liv Tyler has two more teeth than God gave Burt Lancaster. She possesses the most endearing overbite seen in Hollywood since Gene Tierney. Whether Tyler, the 18-year-old star of Bernardo Bertolucci's "Stealing Beauty" and the low-budget "Heavy," has actually heard of any of these people is another matter.Tyler is cool. She has cool. Before a camera, however, her temperature runs several degrees above normal, these changes passing like a progression of seasons across her face, each with its own light.
FEATURES
April 9, 1999
The highest crime in "Cookie's Fortune" comes in the form of a string of unpaid parking tickets. Make that the second-highest crime. Because when the elderly Cookie Orcutt (Patricia Neal) meets her reward midway through the film, her death is interpreted as a murder. Cookie's decadently crumbling house is suddenly awash in yellow police tape, thanks to the efficient work of police lieutenant Lester Boyle (Ned Beatty) and rookie Jason Brown (Chris O'Donnell). And Cookie's family is thrown into something of a tizzy.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 27, 2001
On the improv-comedy TV hit "Whose Line Is It Anyway?," two of the best recurring features are the "noir" game and the "movie styles" game. In the "noir" game, players take turns delivering overripe, hard-boiled narration. In the "movie styles" game, they switch in a second between wildly different movie moods and tones - going from, say, the fearfulness and wit of a Hitchcock thriller to the comic nausea and crassness of a Farrelly Brothers farce. "One Night at McCool's" stars Liv Tyler as a femme fatale who is all things to all men - as producer Michael Douglas has phrased it, she's the madonna and the whore.
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