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Litmus Test

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NEWS
December 29, 2013
I enjoyed columnist Robert Ehrlich Jr.'s article on political affiliation and took his test ( "Unsure of your affiliation? Take this test," Dec. 22). Even though the Democrat side had more than the Republican side, "none of the above" was most apt, and this is exactly what is wrong with our current government. Politicians want you to believe that everything is black and white and that you have to choose one or the other. I am a Democrat only because independents do not get to vote in Maryland primaries.
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NEWS
December 29, 2013
I enjoyed columnist Robert Ehrlich Jr.'s article on political affiliation and took his test ( "Unsure of your affiliation? Take this test," Dec. 22). Even though the Democrat side had more than the Republican side, "none of the above" was most apt, and this is exactly what is wrong with our current government. Politicians want you to believe that everything is black and white and that you have to choose one or the other. I am a Democrat only because independents do not get to vote in Maryland primaries.
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NEWS
July 31, 1994
Del. Ellen R. Sauerbrey's campaign for governor boils down to a single major issue: cut government spending. She has shaped her campaign around her reputation as a rock-solid fiscal conservative. Now she has unveiled a plan to cut $1.3 billion from the state budget and lower taxes.On paper, it sounds appealing: Cut $600 million by freezing the growth in jobs; cut $435 million by reducing operating expenses; cut $150 million from entitlements; apply zero-based budgeting.She plans to wipe out the projected $1.1 billion deficit over fours years, pay for raises for workers and for current education commitments, and provide tax relief by raising the personal income-tax exemption.
NEWS
May 17, 2011
I am trying to hang in with The Sun. Despite running no international soccer news, no international news aside from the littlest paragraphs, and publishing columnists like Marta Mossburg without disclosing her financial support from a demonstrably biased "Institute," I read this newspaper but you are making it so very hard to hang in there. The latest case in point is the front page article about whether the Congress will vote yea or nay on whether the US will meet its debt obligations ("Debt limit, litmus test," May 16)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 24, 2009
J ust when you thought it was safe to start feeling sorry for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Ben Roethlisberger pulled off one of the great last-minute comeback drives to defeat the Green Bay Packers on Sunday and keep hope alive for a wild-card playoff berth. So, the Ravens won't be going to Heinz Field this weekend just to kick their reeling rival while the Steelers are about as down as they've been in several years. Big Ben revived his team's fading playoffs prospects just enough to make for another typical bare-knuckle Ravens-Steelers donnybrook.
NEWS
May 17, 2011
I am trying to hang in with The Sun. Despite running no international soccer news, no international news aside from the littlest paragraphs, and publishing columnists like Marta Mossburg without disclosing her financial support from a demonstrably biased "Institute," I read this newspaper but you are making it so very hard to hang in there. The latest case in point is the front page article about whether the Congress will vote yea or nay on whether the US will meet its debt obligations ("Debt limit, litmus test," May 16)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 19, 2010
It was the easiest test of the year and the Orioles still flunked it. I'm talking about the eight-game homestand that ended Tuesday night at Oriole Park, and I'm not talking about the easiest test so far. I'm talking about the easiest span of the entire 2010 season, if you base that judgment on the performance and standing of the Seattle Mariners, Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Royals when they arrived in Baltimore. Things only get more difficult from here. The Orioles head to Texas to face the first-place Rangers, then to Washington to face the surprising Nationals, a team they never expected to be looking up at in this, supposedly a turn-the-corner season in the Andy MacPhail rebuilding program.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 19, 2004
Long runs of two long-awaited shows - Baltimore's first engagement of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera and the Mid-Atlantic premiere of Disney's The Lion King - will highlight a musical-laden 2004-2005 subscription season at the Hippodrome Theatre. Four other large musicals are also part of the lineup, as well as Say Goodnight Gracie, a one-man show about George Burns, a performer who played the Hippodrome back in its vaudeville days. The musicals include two Rodgers and Hammerstein chestnuts, The King and I and Oklahoma!
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | July 14, 1992
New York --A NEWSDAY gossip columnist, noting the famous, rich folks who've recently had their wallets, jewels and Mercedes-Benzes ripped off in plain daylight, is taking on bets on which Democratic celebrity "will suffer a major New York disaster"Don't wager that the mugging victim will be Bill Clinton. The Democratic nominee-to-be and his handlers have arranged the most foolproof, dissent-proof, ruckus-free convention since -- well, the Communist Party went defunct.And like those old Moscow party conventions, this $40 million New York extravaganza may be as empty of flesh-and-blood conflict.
NEWS
July 9, 1992
Gov. Bill Clinton said he would nominate as a Supreme Court justice only a person who supports Roe vs. Wade, the abortion decision. So Bill Moyers asked Governor Clinton, "Is that not a litmus test?" Such litmus testing of judicial nominees is what the Democrats have been criticizing the Reagan and Bush administrations for applying for years. (Their test was supposed to find judges who opposed the Roe decision.)The governor's answer was, "It is, and it makes me uncomfortable, [but] I would want the first judge I appointed to believe in the right to privacy and the right to choose."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 19, 2010
It was the easiest test of the year and the Orioles still flunked it. I'm talking about the eight-game homestand that ended Tuesday night at Oriole Park, and I'm not talking about the easiest test so far. I'm talking about the easiest span of the entire 2010 season, if you base that judgment on the performance and standing of the Seattle Mariners, Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Royals when they arrived in Baltimore. Things only get more difficult from here. The Orioles head to Texas to face the first-place Rangers, then to Washington to face the surprising Nationals, a team they never expected to be looking up at in this, supposedly a turn-the-corner season in the Andy MacPhail rebuilding program.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 24, 2009
J ust when you thought it was safe to start feeling sorry for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Ben Roethlisberger pulled off one of the great last-minute comeback drives to defeat the Green Bay Packers on Sunday and keep hope alive for a wild-card playoff berth. So, the Ravens won't be going to Heinz Field this weekend just to kick their reeling rival while the Steelers are about as down as they've been in several years. Big Ben revived his team's fading playoffs prospects just enough to make for another typical bare-knuckle Ravens-Steelers donnybrook.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | March 28, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley named his first four nominees to the state Board of Education yesterday, ones that may be crucial in deciding whether state Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick keeps her job. O'Malley nominated two college administrators, one from Prince George's and one from Allegany County, a former president of the Montgomery County Council and an administrator with a Hispanic college organization. The state school board appoints the superintendent. If O'Malley wants to get rid of Grasmick, he will need a board that is compliant.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND and JACK W. GERMOND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2005
WASHINGTON -- To anyone here with a long memory, the Samuel Alito case recalls the saga of another federal judge, G. Harrold Carswell, nominated for the Supreme Court by President Richard M. Nixon 35 years ago. As Alito followed Harriet Miers, Carswell was picked as a replacement for an earlier choice found unacceptable by the Senate, Judge Clement Haynsworth of South Carolina. Like Alito, Carswell became a problem for the White House because of views he had expressed 20 years earlier.
NEWS
By Tom Hamburger and Tom Hamburger,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, the moderate Republican in line to head the Senate Judiciary Committee, pledged yesterday to move quickly on White House judicial nominees if he becomes chairman. White House political adviser Karl Rove said he believes that President Bush's nominees would receive prompt and fair hearings if Specter were chairman. Still, conservative activists complained about Specter's support of abortion rights and urged Senate Republicans not to confirm him. In a news conference Wednesday, the day after the election, Specter predicted that judicial nominees who oppose abortion rights would have a difficult time getting through the Senate.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 19, 2004
Long runs of two long-awaited shows - Baltimore's first engagement of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera and the Mid-Atlantic premiere of Disney's The Lion King - will highlight a musical-laden 2004-2005 subscription season at the Hippodrome Theatre. Four other large musicals are also part of the lineup, as well as Say Goodnight Gracie, a one-man show about George Burns, a performer who played the Hippodrome back in its vaudeville days. The musicals include two Rodgers and Hammerstein chestnuts, The King and I and Oklahoma!
NEWS
By STEVE LENZNER | September 11, 1991
Indianapolis, Indiana. -- Seemingly everyone in the mainstream agrees that to employ ''litmus tests'' on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court would be inappropriate. A moment's reflection should show how empty this prejudice is.By ''litmus tests'' I do not mean guarantees from a candidate that he will vote this way or that way on a potential case. To say nothing of its separation-of-powers implications, such aguarantee would be wrong because all cases involve particular circumstances, and for a judge to guarantee his vote before he had heard all the evidence would be to compromise irreparably his integrity.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 1, 2004
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A confident-sounding Sen. John Kerry accused Republican leaders yesterday of being "scared" of his surging campaign for the Democratic nomination as he stumped through the Midwest, hoping to spark victories in the seven states holding primaries or caucuses Tuesday. Rallying supporters at a downtown Kansas City hotel, Kerry seemed emboldened by recent attacks lobbed at him by high-ranking GOP officials who said that he has embraced positions as a senator that would weaken national security.
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