Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLitmus
IN THE NEWS

Litmus

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 9, 1992
Gov. Bill Clinton said he would nominate as a Supreme Court justice only a person who supports Roe vs. Wade, the abortion decision. So Bill Moyers asked Governor Clinton, "Is that not a litmus test?" Such litmus testing of judicial nominees is what the Democrats have been criticizing the Reagan and Bush administrations for applying for years. (Their test was supposed to find judges who opposed the Roe decision.)The governor's answer was, "It is, and it makes me uncomfortable, [but] I would want the first judge I appointed to believe in the right to privacy and the right to choose."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 29, 2013
I enjoyed columnist Robert Ehrlich Jr.'s article on political affiliation and took his test ( "Unsure of your affiliation? Take this test," Dec. 22). Even though the Democrat side had more than the Republican side, "none of the above" was most apt, and this is exactly what is wrong with our current government. Politicians want you to believe that everything is black and white and that you have to choose one or the other. I am a Democrat only because independents do not get to vote in Maryland primaries.
Advertisement
NEWS
By STEVE LENZNER | September 11, 1991
Indianapolis, Indiana. -- Seemingly everyone in the mainstream agrees that to employ ''litmus tests'' on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court would be inappropriate. A moment's reflection should show how empty this prejudice is.By ''litmus tests'' I do not mean guarantees from a candidate that he will vote this way or that way on a potential case. To say nothing of its separation-of-powers implications, such aguarantee would be wrong because all cases involve particular circumstances, and for a judge to guarantee his vote before he had heard all the evidence would be to compromise irreparably his integrity.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 24, 2009
J ust when you thought it was safe to start feeling sorry for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Ben Roethlisberger pulled off one of the great last-minute comeback drives to defeat the Green Bay Packers on Sunday and keep hope alive for a wild-card playoff berth. So, the Ravens won't be going to Heinz Field this weekend just to kick their reeling rival while the Steelers are about as down as they've been in several years. Big Ben revived his team's fading playoffs prospects just enough to make for another typical bare-knuckle Ravens-Steelers donnybrook.
NEWS
June 16, 1993
The first critics of Supreme Court nominee Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg were pro-choice leaders. That is doubly surprising. It is a surprise to the critics themselves because candidate Bill Clinton promised them he would apply a "litmus test" to this nomination. The test was that the nominee support Roe vs. Wade, which Judge Ginsburg has criticized. But today's criticism is itself a surprise. We say that because closely read, Judge Ginsburg's views on Roe are not really inconsistent with the ideals of the pro-choice movement.
TOPIC
June 9, 2002
Editor's note: This article appeared in the June 3 issue of America Magazine, a publication of the Society of Jesus, more commonly known as Jesuits. WHEN THE U.S. bishops meet June 13-15 in Dallas, the sexual abuse crisis will be at the top of their agenda. The media, the laity and the nation will be watching, ready to pass judgment on the bishops if they do not meet expectations. Two issues have become litmus tests to measure how well the bishops meet their challenge: mandatory reporting and zero tolerance for sex abusers.
NEWS
By Paul Gewirtz | April 29, 1993
PRESIDENT Clinton is being criticized for saying he wants t appoint Supreme Court justices who believe the Constitution protects a woman's right to choose to have an abortion.Critics say that is an inappropriate "litmus test" and will undercut the court's independence.But there is nothing improper about looking for nominees who hold certain general views about the Constitution or who embrace a constitutional right repeatedly recognized under settled law.Would anyone call it an improper "litmus test" for Mr. Clinton to say he will only nominate justices who accept the principle, established by Brown v. Board of Education, that racial segregation is unconstitutional?
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 16, 1993
INDIANAPOLIS -- The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. closed his first convention as executive director of the NAACP yesterday, calling it an "unprecedented display of African-American unity.""It's an old mission, but it's a new vision," Dr. Chavis told the 3,200 delegates. "I'm proud to stand with you -- not ahead of you, but with you."The debut of Dr. Chavis, 45, the group's youngest executive director ever, was a highlight of the 84th annual convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
By Stephen L. Carter | April 29, 1993
DURING the Reagan and Bush administrations, th Republicans systematically eroded federal courts' independence.They did so by applying litmus tests to ensure that those who became judges -- particularly Supreme Court justices -- could be relied on to vote the way the conservatives preferred.This was said to be necessary to balance years of what conservatives considered left-wing judicial activism.Now that the Democrats hold power, President Clinton is under enormous pressure to continue the erosion, by replacing the retiring Justice Byron White with a nominee who can be counted on to vote the way liberals prefer.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 28, 1993
Bill Clinton is a man who picks his words with such extreme, lawyerly care, that one must pay close attention to them. Especially when they begin to change.During his campaign for the presidency, Clinton made clear his Supreme Court nominees would have to support a woman's right to choose whether to have an abortion.On April 5, 1992, Clinton said: "I will appoint judges to the Supreme Court who believe in the constitutional right to privacy, including the right to choose."While the right to privacy is not explicitly mentioned in the Constitution, the Supreme Court has invoked it to allow women to have abortions under certain circumstances, to allow parents to send their children to private schools and to allow people to be removed from respirators when they have no chance for recovery.
NEWS
September 1, 2007
O'Malley defends reasons for firing Gov. Martin O'Malley rebutted yesterday a former state worker's claims that he was fired for political reasons. Nelson Reichart, the former head of real estate for the Department of General Services, filed suit this week, contending that he was terminated in a purge of white Republicans from the agency. Reichart also said his firing was in retaliation for comments he made to The Sun about a Queen Anne's County land deal. The governor said privacy protections in personnel law prevent him from going into detail about the firing, but he said Reichart's accusations are untrue.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 4, 2007
WASHINGTON, Ind. -- It's a long way from Washington, D.C., to Washington, Ind., where my father was born a century ago next January and where I am attending a Thomas family reunion. On the drive from Indianapolis, one passes towns that could fill a Norman Rockwell album. My favorite is named Freedom because, though the town has only a single flashing caution light, it displays many flags. If I don't slow down, I will miss both. Driving past miles of cornfields, listening to local radio stations that still play music, not syndicated political talk, and carry commercials for farm equipment and feed, I ponder what it means to be patriotic and to love America.
NEWS
June 18, 2007
After weeks of intense lobbying and endless speculation about who might vote how, a joint session of the Massachusetts legislature made blessedly quick work last week of a proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. In a State House mobbed with revved-up campaigners on both sides of the issue, lawmakers took a quarter-hour to dispatch the proposal by a decisive margin. The vote was a victory for decency and civil equality, and underscored Massachusetts' long history of protecting individual rights.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | March 28, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley named his first four nominees to the state Board of Education yesterday, ones that may be crucial in deciding whether state Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick keeps her job. O'Malley nominated two college administrators, one from Prince George's and one from Allegany County, a former president of the Montgomery County Council and an administrator with a Hispanic college organization. The state school board appoints the superintendent. If O'Malley wants to get rid of Grasmick, he will need a board that is compliant.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND and JACK W. GERMOND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2005
WASHINGTON -- To anyone here with a long memory, the Samuel Alito case recalls the saga of another federal judge, G. Harrold Carswell, nominated for the Supreme Court by President Richard M. Nixon 35 years ago. As Alito followed Harriet Miers, Carswell was picked as a replacement for an earlier choice found unacceptable by the Senate, Judge Clement Haynsworth of South Carolina. Like Alito, Carswell became a problem for the White House because of views he had expressed 20 years earlier.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The illness of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has generated intensive speculation that President Bush may soon be in position to make his first appointment to the Supreme Court. Indeed, given the advanced ages of other justices, speculation extends to the possibility that he may have the opportunity to make other appointments before the end of his second term, even eventually a majority of the nine-member court. The subject of Supreme Court appointments is often a subplot in presidential elections, as it was in this one. The out party always raises a warning that dire things will happen to the administration of justice if a judge of this or that temperament or philosophy is named.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2000
DES MOINES, Iowa -- Vice President Al Gore backtracked last night on comments he made in a debate Wednesday when he said he would require any appointee to the Joint Chiefs of Staff to agree in advance to let gays to serve openly in the military. "I did not mean to imply that there should ever be any kind of inquiry into the personal political opinion of the officers in the U.S. military," Gore told reporters at a quickly assembled news conference in Des Moines on last night after questions began mounting about his intent.
NEWS
By Tom Hamburger and Tom Hamburger,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, the moderate Republican in line to head the Senate Judiciary Committee, pledged yesterday to move quickly on White House judicial nominees if he becomes chairman. White House political adviser Karl Rove said he believes that President Bush's nominees would receive prompt and fair hearings if Specter were chairman. Still, conservative activists complained about Specter's support of abortion rights and urged Senate Republicans not to confirm him. In a news conference Wednesday, the day after the election, Specter predicted that judicial nominees who oppose abortion rights would have a difficult time getting through the Senate.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | November 9, 2004
MY FRIEND Norine has come up with a way to turn the disappointment of last Tuesday's presidential election into cold, hard cash. She is putting the finishing touches on an ad campaign she is calling "Got Values?" and I am putting all my Starbucks money behind it. There will be T-shirts, bumper stickers, magazine ads and television spots, and instead of a milk mustache, our celebrities will have their foreheads marked with a cross of ashes. We are banking on the fact that the lesson of the presidential election is: "It was values, stupid!"
NEWS
By Tom Hamburger and Tom Hamburger,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, the moderate Republican in line to head the Senate Judiciary Committee, pledged yesterday to move quickly on White House judicial nominees if he becomes chairman. White House political adviser Karl Rove said he believes that President Bush's nominees would receive prompt and fair hearings if Specter were chairman. Still, conservative activists complained about Specter's support of abortion rights and urged Senate Republicans not to confirm him. In a news conference Wednesday, the day after the election, Specter predicted that judicial nominees who oppose abortion rights would have a difficult time getting through the Senate.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.