Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLiterature
IN THE NEWS

Literature

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | June 23, 2005
Where: The Conversation Room in Mellon Hall at St. John's College, 60 College Ave., Annapolis When: noon-1 p.m. Monday Why: Kick the Monday lunchtime blues with a discussion of Joseph Conrad's short story "An Outpost of Progress." Bring a brown-bag lunch, sit down with other literature fans and chew the fat for a while. Other seminars are July 18 and Aug. 8. Register in advance to make sure you have a seat at the table. Information: 410-626-2881, www.stjohnscollege.edu. Free.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SUBLUNARY Unless you're reading sixteen- and seventeenth-century literature, you're not likely to find sublunary  cropping up often, more's the pity. (More's the pity, too, that you're not reading more sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature.)  The word mean existing beneath the moon (from the Latin sub , "under," luna , "moon")
Advertisement
NEWS
By James Marcus | July 18, 2004
TO JUDGE from a sobering report issued by the National Endowment for the Arts, we can now add a new animal to the endangered species list: the American reader. Or more specifically, the reader of literature. As a nation, we seem slowly but surely to be throwing overboard such cultural staples as the novel, the short story, poetry and drama. According to the July 8 report, Americans are deserting these forms in astonishing numbers. To choose just one example, the percentage of literary readers between the ages of 18 and 24 has dropped by 28 percent over the past two decades.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carla Hayden is one of Baltimore's best-known book lovers, one who has spent 21 years at the helm of the city's Enoch Pratt Free Library . When the busy bibliophile takes time off to travel, she appreciates accommodations where books are part of the experience. "One of my favorite hotels is The Library Hotel in New York City," said Hayden, president emeritus of the American Library Association. "It's definitely more than a hotel stay; it's a literary experience. " Housed in a 1912 Neo¿Gothic style "sliver building" - just 25 feet wide and 100 feet long - the luxury hotel is located steps from the New York Public Library.
NEWS
By Hans Zeiger | August 4, 2004
THE MONTGOMERY County Board of Education decided by a 7-1 vote last week that the Boy Scouts and other select religious or community groups cannot have their literature distributed in classrooms. Organizations such as day care centers, nonprofit sports teams, government welfare agencies, anti-drug campaigns, computer clubs, chess clubs, honor societies and PTAs may continue to provide literature for distribution in schools. But the Boy Scouts and church groups cannot. That's because the board wants "to keep out proselytizing pieces of literature," says its vice president, Patricia O'Neill.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | April 5, 1998
The early Eastern black stonefly, the Plecoptera taeniopteryx, treasured by wild, spring-enlivened trout, is slithering up from the ooze these days on thousands of miles of streams, some no wider than a sofa cushion. A third distinct life form mystically senses the inalienable rhythms of the bug to breed and the fish to gorge. These stalwart, sedentary men, and an increasing number of women, are fly fishers. May God have mercy on your soul, should you stand in their paths as the spring hatches commence.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
Phillip Charles McCaffrey, a longtime Loyola University professor of English and poet whose academic interests included medieval and 17th-century English literature, died of pneumonia Oct. 16 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Original Northwood resident was 63. Dr. McCaffrey, the son of a career Coast Guard officer and homemaker, was born in Mobile, Ala., and raised in Beverly, Mass.; Los Angeles; and Michigan. After graduating from Our Lady of Good Counsel High School in Wheaton, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1968 from Fordham University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 12, 2010
J. Desmond Corcoran, a retired McDonogh School English department chairman who was recalled as a demanding but inspirational teacher, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at his Owings Mills home. He was 74. "In the eyes of Des Corcoran, one sees the soul of a great teacher — twinkle, tears, unflinching, caring. It's there in those eyes that tell his students of his understanding and his compassion and his faith," said William C. Mules, McDonogh's former headmaster. "They are the eyes that have seen hardship and misery and that know well the strength of the human spirit.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Norman Henley, a retired Russian-language and world literature teacher and academic editor, died of congestive heart failure at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 96 and had earlier lived in Remington and Charles Village. Born in Auburndale, Mass., he earned a bachelor of arts degree at Boston University. He then studied at Andover-Newton Theological School and the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, Calif. While a student in Boston, he worked as a hospital orderly and assisted in the care of the injured in the 1942 Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Heather Dewar and By Heather Dewar,Sun Staff | February 10, 2002
KEY WEST -- The continuing obliteration of America's unique creatures and communities may be bad for the planet, but it's a boon to literature. American writers and readers have always been infatuated by stories about the land. We're a nation of wanderers and their descendants, and the question "What is my place in the world?" has always been a compelling one. In the past couple of decades, it's become even more urgent as we face the hard truth that, whether we choose to leave home or stay put, home is leaving us. More and more of our best writers are turning away from the gee-whizzery, the preoccupation with wordplay and with stories set in the arid halls of academe that dominated American literature during the Cold War years and well beyond.
NEWS
abornemann@tribune.com | May 6, 2014
Ten-year-old Gillian Blum knew just what to do when she realized that a schedule conflict would prevent her from reading her award-winning letter in person at an April 12 ceremony to recognize the winners of the Letters About Literature contest. So while Gillian was dancing in a recital in Reisterstown, the crowd that had gathered in the Wheeler Auditorium at the Enoch Pratt Library in Baltimore to see winners read their letters instead saw a video of Gillian reading the letter she had written to Brian Selznick, author of "The Invention of Hugo Cabret.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 24, 2014
It was an angry book. Much of the response was angry, too. Some towns banned it, some towns burned it. Every town talked about it. "The Grapes of Wrath" was published 75 years ago this month, a seminal masterpiece of American literature that seems freshly relevant to this era of wealth disparity, rapacious banks and growing poverty. John Steinbeck introduced readers to the Joads, a poor, proud clan of Depression-era Oklahoma farmers who...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
Video crews from C-SPAN are filming in Annapolis this week, highlighting the history of the state capital for programs that will air on the cable channel in September. Mayor Josh Cohen said the public affairs network's focus on Annapolis is "a really cool promotional opportunity" for the city to be seen by a national audience. The segments are part of C-SPAN's 2013 Local Cities Tour, in which producers and crews are visiting more than two dozen small and mid-size cities to document contributions to America.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Norman Henley, a retired Russian-language and world literature teacher and academic editor, died of congestive heart failure at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 96 and had earlier lived in Remington and Charles Village. Born in Auburndale, Mass., he earned a bachelor of arts degree at Boston University. He then studied at Andover-Newton Theological School and the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, Calif. While a student in Boston, he worked as a hospital orderly and assisted in the care of the injured in the 1942 Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 29, 2012
At our monthly breakfast gathering at the big round table by the kitchen at Jimmy's, the Fells Point diner, someone remarked that Ron Matz, the affable WJZ-TV reporter who frequently reports from there, looked dapper as a pallbearer in a black wool topcoat and dark suit. "I'm practicing for my next job, after I retire," Mr. Matz said. "I'm going to be a greeter at Sol Levinson. " Someone went a step further and suggested that Mr. Matz, a longtime Baltimore broadcaster, might finally make his fortune in retirement by anchoring live cablecasts of funerals from the Sol Levinson & Bros.
FEATURES
January 22, 2012
When local author Rosalia Scalia visited India, she was able to sit down with Amandeep Sandhu, author of " Sepia Leaves. " She was kind enough to recount her meeting for Read Street. We'll break her missive into a parts, starting with her description of the encounter, and bit of a Q&A. More of the interview will follow tomorrow. Here, then, is Rosalia: A recent trip to India finds me sitting in Delhi's historic Khan Market in an Italian restaurant run by Tibetans called The Big Chill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alane Salierno Mason and Alane Salierno Mason,Special to the Sun | October 22, 2000
I was standing with my mother on the stoop of an unknown house. A woman answered the door and bent over to retrieve the newspaper lying before us on the doormat. "Do you know how to read yet?" she asked me, and I shook my head. "Oh, it will be so wonderful when you learn how to read!" she exclaimed, "You can learn about the whole world." I believed her. So, it saddens me that Americans are increasingly restricted in what they might read from the rest of the world. A recent survey by the NEA Literature Program showed that of the close to 13,000 works of fiction and poetry published in the United States in 1999, a total of 297 were translated from other languages, including new translations of classic works.
NEWS
November 27, 2003
Clarification An article in yesterday's editions may have implied that a small crowd turned out for a meeting in Annapolis to discuss hate literature. About 100 people attended and more than 20 spoke.
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | October 16, 2011
I told some friends that Tomas Tranströmer had won the Nobel Prize. Some responded, "Who?" and others said that it was cool that someone in Baltimore had won the Nobel. This latter group, of course, had heard the local hubbub and were thinking about Adam Riess at the Johns Hopkins University, who (along with two other physicists) was awarded the Nobel in physics for showing that the universe is still expanding. Mr. Riess was able to infer this by observing close by and further away supernovae.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | July 17, 2011
With the release this weekend of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part II," the final movie in the "Harry Potter" series, fans around the county have enjoyed numerous events to mark the occasion, with more still planned in the weeks to come. Whether making pumpkin juice, creating a family shield or role playing, fans of the boy wizard can't seem to get enough of the popular children's book series and movies. "A Week at Hogwarts," a SummerKids class for ages 9 to 12, has been held at Carroll Community College every summer for the last five years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.