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NEWS
December 31, 2001
Ian Hamilton, 61, a highly regarded British poet and biographer whose unauthorized life of J.D. Salinger was blocked by the Supreme Court, died Thursday. When Mr. Hamilton wrote a biography of Mr. Salinger, author of The Catcher in the Rye, he was not granted an interview and instead used the author's unpublished letters. Mr. Salinger sued, and in 1987 the Supreme Court refused to allow publication of the book, on grounds that it infringed upon Mr. Salinger's copyright. Instead, Mr. Hamilton published In Search of J.D. Salinger, which recounted his frustrating attempts to write his book about the reclusive author.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Margaret C. Doyle, a retired public school English teacher and poet who later taught for many years at the Renaissance Institute, died Thursday from complications following surgery at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The former longtime Pikesville resident was 85. "Margaret was a magnificent woman. She was brilliant and loving," said Jim Holechek, a retired Baltimore public relations executive and author. "Her husband was an artist and she was a poet, and it was always wonderful to interface with her. She was a very sensitive person and able to express herself very well.
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NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Staff writer | November 25, 1990
Prism - a new literary magazine devoted to writers and artists of the Central Maryland counties of Howard, Baltimore and Carroll -- will be found in college and independent bookstores by the spring, according to Patapsco River Publications.The glossy-cover magazine -- approximately 80 pages in length -- will focus on short fiction, non-fiction, poetry, photography and art work from writers and artists who work or live in the tri-county area.D. Scott Swain -- a member of Patapsco River Publications' board of directors and a contributor to Carroll County Community College's student publications -- said that a perusal of Maryland Writer's Manual confirmed what he had guessed for some time: The area had no magazine that promoted the literary and visual arts.
NEWS
February 4, 2007
AACC students win theater honors Three Anne Arundel Community College students won top honors in recent theater competitions. Chelsea Adams of Severna Park, Adam Christy of Arnold and Arthur Sanchez of Annapolis won honors in the Region II Festival of the American College Theatre Festival. Adams, a theater arts major, won first place in the category of Stage Management for her entry based on the AACC Moonlight Troupers drama club's fall production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.
NEWS
February 4, 2007
AACC students win theater honors Three Anne Arundel Community College students won top honors in recent theater competitions. Chelsea Adams of Severna Park, Adam Christy of Arnold and Arthur Sanchez of Annapolis won honors in the Region II Festival of the American College Theatre Festival. Adams, a theater arts major, won first place in the category of Stage Management for her entry based on the AACC Moonlight Troupers drama club's fall production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1998
Heightened sensitivity nationwide about violence among schoolchildren is focusing attention on an unlikely source: a literary magazine from a Carroll County middle school in Taneytown.Several stories depicting violence were published last week in Northwest Middle's "1998 Literary Annual." In one, an 11-year-old girl writes about stalking and killing another pupil. In another, an 11-year-old boy tells of "Grim Reaper" murders in Chicago.Some parents are concerned about the violent pieces, but the school's principal said yesterday that the stories are not the works of seriously disturbed youngsters, but a reflection of a youth culture saturated with violent images.
NEWS
December 9, 1992
* Thompson G. Marsh, 89, a professor of law at the University of Denver for 60 years, died Saturday at his home in Denver. When Mr. Marsh retired in 1987, the school's officials estimated that 70 percent of the lawyers practicing in the Denver area had taken at least one course with him. His specialties included property and mining law and legal philosophy.* Harold Kreiger, 86. a lawyer in Jersey City for 60 years, died Saturday at his home in New York City after a heart attack. A senior member of the Jersey City law firm of Kreiger & Browde, he was a Democratic Party stalwart in New Jersey for more than 50 years.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2000
The written word meshed with computer-generated art at the unveiling ceremony of the middle school literary magazine Our Voice. Fifty-one short stories, poems and computer-drawn illustrations were published, chosen from nearly 200 entries submitted by pupils from 17 Howard County middle schools. Our Voice is an appropriate title for a magazine filled with the thoughts of youngsters about topics ranging from the millennium and music to family, self and nature. Included was a poem about a Hershey's Kiss.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2000
The written word meshed with computer-generated art at the unveiling ceremony of the middle school literary magazine Our Voice. Fifty-one short stories, poems and computer-drawn illustrations were published, chosen from nearly 200 entries submitted by pupils from 17 Howard County middle schools. Our Voice is an appropriate title for a magazine filled with the thoughts of youngsters about topics ranging from the millennium and music to family, self and nature. Included was a poem about a Hershey's Kiss.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 2006
It wasn't the most dignified of settings for an editorial meeting. The larger meeting room of the Miller branch library in Ellicott City was occupied with a "teddy bear tea party" Monday night, so the teens who were starting an online magazine had to sit on the floor of the story-time room in the children's section. Though the room was small, no one complained during the meeting. Instead, discussion centered on what kinds of articles would appear in the new publication, and on basic rules for the magazine.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | December 29, 2006
In 1977, the Little Patuxent Review published an essay about the challenges of establishing regular readings, films, concerts and plays in a new community. The writer lamented that "for the moment, the arts in the new town of Columbia have street addresses in Baltimore, Washington and Ellicott City." Almost 30 years later, Columbia has more theater companies, musical groups, dance companies and art galleries, but local artists are still seeking ways to sustain a vibrant arts scene throughout Howard County.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 2006
It wasn't the most dignified of settings for an editorial meeting. The larger meeting room of the Miller branch library in Ellicott City was occupied with a "teddy bear tea party" Monday night, so the teens who were starting an online magazine had to sit on the floor of the story-time room in the children's section. Though the room was small, no one complained during the meeting. Instead, discussion centered on what kinds of articles would appear in the new publication, and on basic rules for the magazine.
NEWS
December 31, 2001
Ian Hamilton, 61, a highly regarded British poet and biographer whose unauthorized life of J.D. Salinger was blocked by the Supreme Court, died Thursday. When Mr. Hamilton wrote a biography of Mr. Salinger, author of The Catcher in the Rye, he was not granted an interview and instead used the author's unpublished letters. Mr. Salinger sued, and in 1987 the Supreme Court refused to allow publication of the book, on grounds that it infringed upon Mr. Salinger's copyright. Instead, Mr. Hamilton published In Search of J.D. Salinger, which recounted his frustrating attempts to write his book about the reclusive author.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2000
The written word meshed with computer-generated art at the unveiling ceremony of the middle school literary magazine Our Voice. Fifty-one short stories, poems and computer-drawn illustrations were published, chosen from nearly 200 entries submitted by pupils from 17 Howard County middle schools. Our Voice is an appropriate title for a magazine filled with the thoughts of youngsters about topics ranging from the millennium and music to family, self and nature. Included was a poem about a Hershey's Kiss.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2000
The written word meshed with computer-generated art at the unveiling ceremony of the middle school literary magazine Our Voice. Fifty-one short stories, poems and computer-drawn illustrations were published, chosen from nearly 200 entries submitted by pupils from 17 Howard County middle schools. Our Voice is an appropriate title for a magazine filled with the thoughts of youngsters about topics ranging from the millennium and music to family, self and nature. Included was a poem about a Hershey's Kiss.
ENTERTAINMENT
By San Jose Mercury News | April 30, 2000
First it was the Berkeley Barb, a counterculture newspaper that bit the establishment in the late 1960s. But the times and the political climate in Berkeley have changed, and so have the publications: now there's Bark, a cultural arts magazine for dog-lovers. A tongue-in-cheek homage to the Barb, Bark is one of the country's hottest new publications -- described by the New York Times as "the New Yorker of dog magazines." The Berkeley, Calif. quarterly, the creation of Claudia Kawczynska and Cameron Woo, has blossomed from an eight-page newsletter to a 64-page glossy magazine with 60,000 subscribers.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
Didn't anybody tell Baltimore-native Carla Ray Small that it could not be done? Was no one around to warn her this was an impossible dream? She couldn't possibly pull it off. Could she?Well, yes. She could, and she did. Ms. Small, 27, has entered the competitive magazine market and launched "SisterSHOUT!". The magazine is geared toward African-American women, and its first cover story, written by Ms. Small, is an interview with former Black Panther Party leader Elaine Brown.But Ms. Small, with her dogged persistence and unflagging optimism, would make a fitting subject.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | December 29, 2006
In 1977, the Little Patuxent Review published an essay about the challenges of establishing regular readings, films, concerts and plays in a new community. The writer lamented that "for the moment, the arts in the new town of Columbia have street addresses in Baltimore, Washington and Ellicott City." Almost 30 years later, Columbia has more theater companies, musical groups, dance companies and art galleries, but local artists are still seeking ways to sustain a vibrant arts scene throughout Howard County.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1998
Heightened sensitivity nationwide about violence among schoolchildren is focusing attention on an unlikely source: a literary magazine from a Carroll County middle school in Taneytown.Several stories depicting violence were published last week in Northwest Middle's "1998 Literary Annual." In one, an 11-year-old girl writes about stalking and killing another pupil. In another, an 11-year-old boy tells of "Grim Reaper" murders in Chicago.Some parents are concerned about the violent pieces, but the school's principal said yesterday that the stories are not the works of seriously disturbed youngsters, but a reflection of a youth culture saturated with violent images.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
Didn't anybody tell Baltimore-native Carla Ray Small that it could not be done? Was no one around to warn her this was an impossible dream? She couldn't possibly pull it off. Could she?Well, yes. She could, and she did. Ms. Small, 27, has entered the competitive magazine market and launched "SisterSHOUT!". The magazine is geared toward African-American women, and its first cover story, written by Ms. Small, is an interview with former Black Panther Party leader Elaine Brown.But Ms. Small, with her dogged persistence and unflagging optimism, would make a fitting subject.
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