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By Tim Warren | August 28, 1995
RL's BLUES. By Walter Mosley, W.W. Norton, 267 pages, $22. WALTER MOSLEY IS trying his hand at literary fiction in this novel, and for that he'll automatically take some shots. For literary fiction and mystery novels are generally considered such discrete entities that anyone who moves from one camp to the other is instantly suspect. Joyce Carol Oates, who writes suspense novels under the pen name Rosamund Smith, and James Lee Burke are among the few writers to succeed in both areas.Certainly one can be very good at one and inept in the other, for ultimately the goals are different.
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NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[ Special to The Sun] | August 26, 2007
Always By Nicola Griffith Riverhead (Penguin) / 480 pages / $26.95 The debate springs up every so often: Can writing that is also mystery, science fiction, gothic or romance still be literary and address serious issues? Or is it all just glorified beach reading? The argument has been raging anew for months, fueled by comments and commentary by the likes of such award-winning writers as Michael Chabon, Ursula K. LeGuin, Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Michael Cunningham and Stephen King.
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NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | November 5, 2006
Lisey's Story Stephen King Simon & Schuster / 528 pages / $28 No more apologies. For years, I and many other serious readers have had to mumble their love of Stephen King as if it were a unmentionable fetish, a peccadillo that dare not speak its name in polite - read "literary" - company. No more. King, whose horror novels, stories, films and e-books have kept millions of readers up at night for more than 30 years, has crossed over. No, not into the other realms of which he writes so convincingly (The Shining is possibly the scariest novel ever written)
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | November 5, 2006
Lisey's Story Stephen King Simon & Schuster / 528 pages / $28 No more apologies. For years, I and many other serious readers have had to mumble their love of Stephen King as if it were a unmentionable fetish, a peccadillo that dare not speak its name in polite - read "literary" - company. No more. King, whose horror novels, stories, films and e-books have kept millions of readers up at night for more than 30 years, has crossed over. No, not into the other realms of which he writes so convincingly (The Shining is possibly the scariest novel ever written)
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[ Special to The Sun] | August 26, 2007
Always By Nicola Griffith Riverhead (Penguin) / 480 pages / $26.95 The debate springs up every so often: Can writing that is also mystery, science fiction, gothic or romance still be literary and address serious issues? Or is it all just glorified beach reading? The argument has been raging anew for months, fueled by comments and commentary by the likes of such award-winning writers as Michael Chabon, Ursula K. LeGuin, Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Michael Cunningham and Stephen King.
NEWS
By Anita Finkel and Anita Finkel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 1996
It's not every month that a masterpiece of contemporary world fiction becomes available to readers of English. This July, though, readers get a rare treat with the publication of "My Uncle Napoleon" (Mage Publishers. 516 pages, $30), a tale of family life in Iran in the 1930s written by Oral Pezeshkza and translated from the original Persian by Dick Davis."My Uncle Napoleon" is a family saga, assembling types whose appeal lies in their familiarity - the naive young lovers, cagey servant, choleric deceived wife - touched with just enough individuality to make them memorable.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 11, 2013
The recent announcement that Atomic Books will expand and make beer available at special events is an intriguing -- and promising -- development for all indie bookstores. We've all seen how hard it is for the small stores to compete these days. They've been hammered on all sides -- by giant Barnes & Noble, by discounters such as Walmart, and more recently by the growth of ebooks. It takes a lot of imaginative marketing -- and a fair share of good fortune -- to survive. That's why the Atomic Books expansion in Hampden is so interesting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 2005
Roll out the red carpet: The publishing industry is trying to apply some glitter to its image with a new book awards program that is a cross between the Oscars and the People's Choice Awards. A new philanthropy called the Quills Literacy Foundation has announced the formation of the Quill Awards, a slate of 19 annual book awards, most of which will be voted on by the general public. Reed Business Information, the parent of Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and Variety, among other trade publications, and the 14 local television stations owned by NBC Universal Television are backing the awards.
FEATURES
By Renee Tawa and Renee Tawa,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2003
SHIRLEY Hazzard's long-awaited post-World War II novel won the National Book Award for fiction last night, although a dispute over an honorary medal awarded to Stephen King threatened to overshadow this year's winners at a New York ceremony. Hazzard's book, The Great Fire (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), was her first published work of fiction in more than 20 years. The Australian-born novelist lives in New York. The nonfiction prize was awarded to Yale University professor Carlos Eire, for Waiting for Snow in Havana (Free Press)
FEATURES
By Booth Moore and Booth Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 1999
There's a new men's magazine on the stands this month from Flynt Publications.No, not that kind of magazine.The premiere, 128-page issue of Code, with actor Samuel L. Jackson on the cover, offers fashion pages, literary fiction, essays and political commentary for men of color.Code's goal is to present a multifaceted image of black men. "Until now, there haven't been any images in the media that reflect black males to themselves," says Abbie Britton, Code's publications director."In the world, not in the media, black men are multifaceted human beings, bankers who listen to hip-hop and -homeboys who listen to Mozart."
NEWS
By Anita Finkel and Anita Finkel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 1996
It's not every month that a masterpiece of contemporary world fiction becomes available to readers of English. This July, though, readers get a rare treat with the publication of "My Uncle Napoleon" (Mage Publishers. 516 pages, $30), a tale of family life in Iran in the 1930s written by Oral Pezeshkza and translated from the original Persian by Dick Davis."My Uncle Napoleon" is a family saga, assembling types whose appeal lies in their familiarity - the naive young lovers, cagey servant, choleric deceived wife - touched with just enough individuality to make them memorable.
NEWS
By Tim Warren | August 28, 1995
RL's BLUES. By Walter Mosley, W.W. Norton, 267 pages, $22. WALTER MOSLEY IS trying his hand at literary fiction in this novel, and for that he'll automatically take some shots. For literary fiction and mystery novels are generally considered such discrete entities that anyone who moves from one camp to the other is instantly suspect. Joyce Carol Oates, who writes suspense novels under the pen name Rosamund Smith, and James Lee Burke are among the few writers to succeed in both areas.Certainly one can be very good at one and inept in the other, for ultimately the goals are different.
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | August 14, 1994
"Dixie City Jam" is the seventh crime novel by James Lee Burke, and it appears that, by its early position on the best-seller lists, that he is finally getting the recognition he deserves. Mr. Burke's Dave Robicheaux novels have been among the best in American crime fiction of the past decade, and while fans have been touting this series from the opening book, "Neon Rain," commercial success has come more slowly. "Dixie City Jam," one of the strongest books in the series, may just put him over the top.Robicheaux is a former New Orleans homicide detective, a recovering alcoholic, who now operates as a sheriff's deputy in New Iberia, La., and also runs a fishing camp there.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | October 14, 2007
Exit Ghost By Philip Roth Houghton Mifflin / 294 pages / $26 The process of dying is long, lonely and arduous, which goes a long way toward explaining why we don't like to discuss it much in literary fiction. The failure of the body - incontinence, impotence, jagged scars and missing hair - it's grim stuff, nightmare material. There's the dramatic dying, of course - the opening pages of Norman Mailer's The Naked and the Dead certainly exploit the harrowing nature of sudden, youthful death.
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