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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
Fiction writer Rafael Alvarez, poet Barbara Hurd and playwright Rohn Luckett have won Artscape's 1994 literary arts awards, according to the Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and Culture.Mr. Alvarez, a reporter for The Sun and a Baltimore native, won his award for the short story "The Fountain of Highlandtown." It will be printed in a chapbook edition of 240 copies.Ms. Hurd, who teaches at Frostburg State University and directs the Western Maryland Writer's Workshop, won for her poetry collection "Objects in This Mirror."
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March 11, 2013
The Dance Conservatory of Maryland will hold its annual Contemporary Showcase this month, with proceeds being donated to Center for the Arts. The future Center for the Arts will serve Harford County as a facility, accessible to all, to nurture art, artists and the community in the disciplines of music, dance, theater and the visual and literary arts and Dance Conservatory of Maryland is excited to be able to support such a wonderful cause. The Contemporary Showcase will provide an offering of works from several classes at Dance Conservatory of Maryland, including jazz, tap, hip hop and modern.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 17, 2002
A senior at Loyola Blakefield was presented with the first James K. McManus Award for excellence in journalism or the literary arts at the school's annual awards ceremony yesterday at the campus in Towson. McManus, better known as sports commentator Jim McKay, presented the award to David Renie, 17, of Cockeysville. Renie received a $1,500 cash award, and his name will be the first inscribed on a plaque to be displayed in Burk Hall at the Catholic high school. Renie will attend the University of Maryland, College Park, where he has received a full scholarship.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2009
The television industry has its Emmy, Broadway theater has its Tony and film has its Oscar, all awarded at ceremonies steeped in rivalry. Anne Arundel County has its Annie Award, bestowed on seven local arts contributors at a casual ceremony. In recent years this ceremony has been staged at Severn School's Price Auditorium, where local arts celebrities gather in camaraderie with their peers. At the 10th annual Annie Awards program, founding Arts Council member Cynthia McBride gave a brief history of how the award was designed, and the early decision to award Annies to a select few who had made lasting contributions to Anne Arundel arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
Gregg Wilhelm wants literary arts to step out of the shadows of its more sociable cousins. He's the helmsman of CityLit Festival V, a daylong celebration of the written word, which takes over the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Library on Saturday. "Literary arts are just as important and creative and enlightening as going to the BMA or Center Stage," said Wilhelm. "But they have this weird dilemma of often being created and consumed in solitude." The festival, which includes panel discussions, workshops, readings and appearances by several local authors, aims to show the public that literary arts can function as a more community-based activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1993
Artscape '93 will take place rain or shine. But in case of severe weather, Friday, Saturday or Sunday:* Selected performances on Decker Stage will move to the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, as will souvenir sales.* Selected performances on Fox Stage will move to the Langsdale Auditorium of the University of Baltimore on Oliver Street.* The Art-Ventures Family Performance Tent will move to the Student Center of the Maryland Institute, College of Art on Mount Royal Avenue.* Literary Arts Tents and Cultural Resource Tents will move to the lobby of the University of Baltimore Law Center on Maryland Avenue at Oliver Street.
FEATURES
July 18, 1993
In Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section, the wrong telephone number was listed for additional information about Artscape. The correct number is 396-4575.The Sun regrets the error.Here's a lineup of Artscape events, which start Thursday and continue through July 25.THURSDAY* 6 p.m. at the Decker Gallery, Mount Royal Station Building Meyerhoff Gallery, Thesis Gallery, Fox Building; Maryland Institute, College of Art (MICA) and outdoor sites: ARTSCAPEvisual arts exhibitions; reception.FRIDAY* 6 p.m.: Visual arts exhibitions, crafts, literary arts tents, cultura resource tents and food booths open.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
With "Growing Art in Baltimore" as its motto, Artscape '98 promises a celebration that's grown to be bigger than ever, its organizers say.In its 17th year, Baltimore's free annual arts festival will feature music and performing arts on three outdoor stages, indoor and outdoor visual arts exhibitions, opera, chamber music, international dance, literary arts workshops and celebrity readings, street theater and activities for children and families.Artscape runs tomorrow through Sunday."It's an incredibly wonderful coming together of everyone in the region," said Claudia Bismark, director of development for Artscape '98. "We have participants from all up and down the East Coast."
FEATURES
July 10, 1994
Here is a schedule of Artscape activities.Friday, July 15* 6 p.m.Visual arts exhibitions, crafts, literary arts tents, cultural resource tents and food booths open.* 7 p.m.Decker Stage -- The "Whit" Williams Orchestra (big band swing)Fox Stage -- The Dave Cosby Project (world beat and jazz)* 7:30 p.m.Law Center, University of Baltimore (UB) -- literary arts awards ceremony* 8 p.m.Law Center, UB -- Barbara Hurd, winner of Artscape literary arts award for poetry, reads from "Objects in This Mirror"* 8:15 p.m.Decker Stage -- Aretha Franklin (soul and rhythm and blues)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1996
Thursday6 p.m.Artscape begins: Visual arts exhibitions reception - Decker Gallery Mount Royal Station Building; Meyerhoff Gallery, Student Gallery and Thesis Gallery, Fox Building; and selected Performance Art in Decker Auditorium, Maryland Institute College of Art and outdoor sites along Mount Royal Avenue7 p.m.The Motor Morons, in front of Lyric Opera House7:30 p.m.The Oneness of Us, Fox BuildingFriday6 p.m.Opening: Visual arts exhibitions, crafts market,...
NEWS
By Lauren Shull and Lauren Shull,Sun reporter | May 25, 2008
Gregg Wilhelm stands in front of a large metal cabinet in a classroom full of computers, proudly displaying the books that his students have published. It's an eclectic mix, ranging from poetry to wine guides to a translation of the diaries of a second-century Christian martyr. Wilhelm makes his living off the printed word. In addition to helping run Loyola College's student-staffed educational publishing house, Apprentice House, he is founder and CEO of the CityLit Project. At Apprentice, students learn to develop projects and design and market books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
Gregg Wilhelm wants literary arts to step out of the shadows of its more sociable cousins. He's the helmsman of CityLit Festival V, a daylong celebration of the written word, which takes over the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Library on Saturday. "Literary arts are just as important and creative and enlightening as going to the BMA or Center Stage," said Wilhelm. "But they have this weird dilemma of often being created and consumed in solitude." The festival, which includes panel discussions, workshops, readings and appearances by several local authors, aims to show the public that literary arts can function as a more community-based activity.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | December 29, 2006
In 1977, the Little Patuxent Review published an essay about the challenges of establishing regular readings, films, concerts and plays in a new community. The writer lamented that "for the moment, the arts in the new town of Columbia have street addresses in Baltimore, Washington and Ellicott City." Almost 30 years later, Columbia has more theater companies, musical groups, dance companies and art galleries, but local artists are still seeking ways to sustain a vibrant arts scene throughout Howard County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BRANDT and JESSICA BRANDT,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
On Saturday, the CityLit Project will host its third annual literary arts festival at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The daylong event, which celebrates the culture of literature in Baltimore, will feature three major book debuts and several poetry readings, as well as lectures, writing workshops and an open mike. Chicago-based performance poet Tyehimba Jess, recently named one of the 18 new poets to watch by Poets & Writers Magazine, will head the poetry schedule with a reading from his newest anthology leadbelly.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
For the fourth year, the Cultural Arts Foundation will honor six Anne Arundel County residents with Annie awards for their contributions to the arts, with a reception scheduled today at Historic London Town House and Gardens in Edgewater. Award categories are lifetime achievement, education, arts patronage, literary arts, visual arts and performing arts. The honorees are: Eloise Vaughan, lifetime achievement award. A longtime Linthicum Heights resident, Vaughan founded the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum in 1981, and for nine years served as its president.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Furlong and Julia Furlong,Sun Staff | September 11, 2003
COMING UP Check out the city's best flavors Saturday at the seventh annual Taste of Baltimore. More than 70 restaurants will be selling food and beverages, and at the Giant Food Pavilion, visitors can sample new food products, take part in eating contests and other games and listen to concerts. This year's acts include Hootie and the Blowfish, IKE, Fountains of Wayne, Jonasay, Beatwater, Tony Barry and New Money and Irish Thunder. In addition, Ravens players will be hanging around the Jock stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999
It will be hot. It could be wet. It will be crowded. There will be controversy, likely tempered by good humor. There will be people from down the street and across the globe. The lines for funnel cakes will be longer than those for the galleries. There will be high art and low, art for sale and art for art's sake. Everyone who is not an artist will be a critic. It will be, in short, another Artscape.Artscape, which runs Friday through Sunday, is a ripe old 18 now, having survived thunderstorms, political storms and endless debate over what it is and ought to be. Those who produce it have put an annual focus and a face on Baltimore's arts community; some of the faces of Artscape 1999 are pictured here.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
For the fourth year, the Cultural Arts Foundation will honor six Anne Arundel County residents with Annie awards for their contributions to the arts, with a reception scheduled today at Historic London Town House and Gardens in Edgewater. Award categories are lifetime achievement, education, arts patronage, literary arts, visual arts and performing arts. The honorees are: Eloise Vaughan, lifetime achievement award. A longtime Linthicum Heights resident, Vaughan founded the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum in 1981, and for nine years served as its president.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 2002
For the third year, the Cultural Arts Foundation will honor six Anne Arundel County residents with Annie awards for their contributions to the arts, with a reception Thursday evening at Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts in Brooklyn Park. The Annie awards are given in the categories of lifetime achievement, education, arts patronage, and literary, visual, and performing arts. This year's honorees are: Lifetime Achievement - Douglas Allanbrook, an 81-year-old Annapolis resident who is a composer, harpsichordist and teacher.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 17, 2002
A senior at Loyola Blakefield was presented with the first James K. McManus Award for excellence in journalism or the literary arts at the school's annual awards ceremony yesterday at the campus in Towson. McManus, better known as sports commentator Jim McKay, presented the award to David Renie, 17, of Cockeysville. Renie received a $1,500 cash award, and his name will be the first inscribed on a plaque to be displayed in Burk Hall at the Catholic high school. Renie will attend the University of Maryland, College Park, where he has received a full scholarship.
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