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By Sloane Brown | November 18, 2001
Leave it to the Literacy Works folks to go literal at their annual fund-raiser, this year calling it "Book Bash 2001: A Reading Odyssey." Around 700 guests explored the space at the Atrium at Towson Circle, which was decorated with neon geometric forms and colored lighting. There they could explore galaxies of wonderful dishes offered by local restaurants and caterers. "I've had every piece of chocolate in this place," moaned intrepid explorer Judy Waranch, who had obviously orbited the event's extensive chocolate cosmos.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
Children's book author Jerdine Nolen remembers the first time she saw her name in print. As a second-grader, she wrote a Thanksgiving poem that was published in the school newspaper, and she kept her eyes glued to the pink publication while walking home. "It was really a moment to behold to see my name in print," said the special-education teacher at Mount Hebron High School, who has published about a dozen books and picture books. Her latest work, a novel titled "Eliza's Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diary," is one of five books nominated for an NAACP Image Award in the category of Outstanding Literary Work — Youth/Teens.
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NEWS
November 5, 2000
Literacy Works Inc. will hold its annual fund-raiser, Book Bash 2000, at 6 p.m. today at Bibelot in the Timonium Crossing Shopping Center, 2080 York Road. The event, which will benefit the nonprofit organization's literacy work in Baltimore County, will feature auctions, book signings, musical performances and restaurant tastings. Tickets are $40 per person in advance and $50 at the door. Information: 410-887-2001.
NEWS
May 20, 2008
3 colleges schedule graduations Three county colleges and universities have scheduled commencement ceremonies this week. Towson University will hold graduation exercises at 10 a.m. and at 2 p.m. tomorrow, Thursday and Friday for its colleges and schools at the Towson Center arena on campus. The University of Maryland, Baltimore County's undergraduate ceremony will be at 1 p.m. Thursday at 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. The graduate school ceremony will be at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Retriever Activities Center on campus.
NEWS
By Alyson Klein and Alyson Klein,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2003
When it began four years ago, Literacy Works, an adult education program, served 166 students in Baltimore County. Today, thanks to a new grant, that number has grown to more than 500 in the county and in Baltimore City. The expansion in February to two sites in the city -- George Washington Elementary School and Paul's Place Outreach Center -- seems a natural step for Literacy Works, a nonprofit organization that helps adults prepare for high school diplomas and reach other educational goals, said Helene Waranch, the program's executive director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,special to the sun | June 16, 2002
Seems Baltimore's party circuit is keeping up with the weather - getting hot, hot, hot! The recent Literacy Works luncheon was a huge success, according to event committee member Caryn Sagal. Some 350 folks came to the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel to hear political consultant James Carville speak. And the first thing Carville told the gathering was that he had changed his mind about talking about his new book, "Buck Up, Suck Up ... And Come Back When You Foul Up: 12 Winning Secrets From The War Room."
NEWS
By David Anderson and David Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
When Sylvia White was in high school, her principal told her she had to make a choice: She could stay in school and take care of her child, or she could drop out and go to work. She dropped out. "I had to make a choice: work or school," White said. "I must say I made the wrong choice." White was at the Randallstown Library yesterday for the dedication of Literacy Works' new Community Technology Center. Now 35, the single mother of three children is working to get her General Educational Development diploma through Literacy Works' adult-education program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 14, 1999
It was a well-read and well-fed crowd at "Book Bash 1999." Some 600 folks turned out at the Bibelot bookstore in Pikesville to meet more than 60 authors and eat offerings from 20 area restaurants and caterers.There were book readings, book signings and book buying aplenty, bringing in some $75,000 for Literacy Works Inc., a nonprofit agency that coordinates adult literacy programs and services in Baltimore County.Book "bashers" included Helene Waranch, executive director of Literacy Works Inc.; Lindy Small, board member; Lori Southworth and Barbara Shapiro, event co-chairs; Elayne Hettleman, Caryn Sagal, Sandy Feldman, event committee members; Diane Rehm, Rochelle Krich, Jerdine Nolen, John Shields, Ted Patterson, Blair Walker, authors; Richard Lee, Baltimore County Minority Business Enterprise officer; Michelle Waranch, White House intern; Ken Waldych, Allfirst Bank senior VP; and Debbie Owens, host of the WEAA radio show "Money Talks."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 21, 1999
Some 650 faithful fans of Cokie Roberts weren't about to let a little snow keep them from a recent breakfast with her at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn.The ABC-TV and National Public Radio news analyst made the trek worthwhile, as she regaled the group with some stories she recounts in her book, "We Are Our Mothers' Daughters." Roberts got a good laugh from her primarily female audience when she derided the computer term "multi-tasking" as "a guy word for something women have always done."The women who helped organize the affair included: event chairwoman Malinda Small; committee members Nancy Cohen, Elayne Hettleman and Sandy Newman; and Literacy Works executive director Helene Waranch.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
At Book Bash, the first major fund-raiser for adult literacy programs in Baltimore County, art lovers can gain insight into the world of coffee-table art through the eyes of Arnold Lehman, director of the Baltimore Museum of Art.Weekend chefs can learn to separate the classic cookbooks from the pretenders with guidance from Anne Grieves, owner of the Take Five cooking school. Bob Benson, nationally renowned orchid grower and director of community arts development at the Maryland State Arts Council, will cut a path through the profusion of gardening books.
NEWS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
Moving from a suburban bookstore to a swanky ballroom, this year's Book Bash will feature nearly 50 authors, including historians, actors and writers of children's books. After more than 600 people attended last year at the Greetings and Readings in Hunt Valley, organizers moved tonight's event downtown to the Tremont Grand. This year, a bigger space, a jazz band and flutist, caterers and presentations by authors Chip Silverman and Michael Tucker (of L.A. Law fame) may mean an even larger turnout, said Caryn Sagal, the event's publicity chair.
NEWS
December 21, 2005
Advertising Planit Integrated Communications of Baltimore announced the following staff appointments: Cameron Barry, director of public relations; Kristin Brunnworth and Angela Walseng, public relations account executives; and Melissa Dobres, public relations assistant account executive. Banking and finance SunTrust Banks Inc. appointed Edie Loughlin senior vice president and relationship manager, and Steve Miller vice president and portfolio specialist in the regional bank's Baltimore-based Maryland real estate finance group.
NEWS
By David Anderson and David Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
When Sylvia White was in high school, her principal told her she had to make a choice: She could stay in school and take care of her child, or she could drop out and go to work. She dropped out. "I had to make a choice: work or school," White said. "I must say I made the wrong choice." White was at the Randallstown Library yesterday for the dedication of Literacy Works' new Community Technology Center. Now 35, the single mother of three children is working to get her General Educational Development diploma through Literacy Works' adult-education program.
NEWS
By Alyson Klein and Alyson Klein,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2003
When it began four years ago, Literacy Works, an adult education program, served 166 students in Baltimore County. Today, thanks to a new grant, that number has grown to more than 500 in the county and in Baltimore City. The expansion in February to two sites in the city -- George Washington Elementary School and Paul's Place Outreach Center -- seems a natural step for Literacy Works, a nonprofit organization that helps adults prepare for high school diplomas and reach other educational goals, said Helene Waranch, the program's executive director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,special to the sun | June 16, 2002
Seems Baltimore's party circuit is keeping up with the weather - getting hot, hot, hot! The recent Literacy Works luncheon was a huge success, according to event committee member Caryn Sagal. Some 350 folks came to the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel to hear political consultant James Carville speak. And the first thing Carville told the gathering was that he had changed his mind about talking about his new book, "Buck Up, Suck Up ... And Come Back When You Foul Up: 12 Winning Secrets From The War Room."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 18, 2001
Leave it to the Literacy Works folks to go literal at their annual fund-raiser, this year calling it "Book Bash 2001: A Reading Odyssey." Around 700 guests explored the space at the Atrium at Towson Circle, which was decorated with neon geometric forms and colored lighting. There they could explore galaxies of wonderful dishes offered by local restaurants and caterers. "I've had every piece of chocolate in this place," moaned intrepid explorer Judy Waranch, who had obviously orbited the event's extensive chocolate cosmos.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | January 13, 1991
Can learning to read keep a jailbird from returning to the slammer?County detention center administrators aren't sure, but they will give it a try.On Tuesday, the detention center launched a reading and writing program for functionally illiterate inmates. The new skills, say detention center administrators, should help inmates cope when they leave prison."If we help inmates lower their probability of returning to prison, I think the program will be viable," said Lt. Cole Nelson, the detention center's inmate services commander.
NEWS
November 5, 2000
Literacy Works Inc. will hold its annual fund-raiser, Book Bash 2000, at 6 p.m. today at Bibelot in the Timonium Crossing Shopping Center, 2080 York Road. The event, which will benefit the nonprofit organization's literacy work in Baltimore County, will feature auctions, book signings, musical performances and restaurant tastings. Tickets are $40 per person in advance and $50 at the door. Information: 410-887-2001.
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