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NEWS
July 8, 2014
I was blessed to be an instructor at Baltimore Reads, Inc. It gave thousands of books away and taught English, civics and literacy. It gave students a power that only comes through education. The instructors and administration taught in all elements, often dragging our classrooms from site to site. Our students meant everything. Their goals meant everything. It was heartbreaking to inform them we were closing. Why? Funding. Money. It told the students their futures weren't good enough to fund.
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NEWS
July 8, 2014
I was blessed to be an instructor at Baltimore Reads, Inc. It gave thousands of books away and taught English, civics and literacy. It gave students a power that only comes through education. The instructors and administration taught in all elements, often dragging our classrooms from site to site. Our students meant everything. Their goals meant everything. It was heartbreaking to inform them we were closing. Why? Funding. Money. It told the students their futures weren't good enough to fund.
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NEWS
July 29, 2010
In his recent commentary article ("Kids need environmental literacy," July 28) our governor praised the students at Kennard Elementary School in Queen Anne's County for building "a marsh in their own schoolyard." Did the EPA's required environmental impact study actually approve this project? It is my understanding that marshlands or wetlands or whatever he wants to call them are breeding grounds for disease-carrying mosquitoes. Right next to the children's school! And what in the world does he mean by "environmental literacy"?
NEWS
July 3, 2014
In 1988, Ronald Reagan was president and Kurt L. Schmoke was mayor of Baltimore. Mayor Schmoke had a vision for Baltimore as "The City that Reads," and from that vision Baltimore Reads was born ( "Funding woes close Baltimore Reads," May 2). Over its 26 year history, Baltimore Reads engaged in a number of literacy services for the city including providing a book bank for families and schools and offering classes for youth and adults. In the last several years, Baltimore Reads has given away hundreds of thousands of books and helped thousands of Baltimore Residents learn to read, speak English and earn their high school diplomas by passing the GED exam.
NEWS
Erica L.Green | April 19, 2012
With books in hand, hundreds of prominent black male city leaders and community members will descend on classrooms around the city Monday to read to students, part of an initiative to promote literacy and positive male influences in the lives of city youth. The effort called the "Michael Penny Carter Men Reading in Baltimore City Schools Initiative," was introduced in the city by Marvin "Doc" Cheatham, president of the local the National Action Network, last fall. The program was inspired by a similar one in Chicago, and has drawn the support of local political, education, and religious leaders across the city.
FEATURES
By Orla Swift and Orla Swift,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 29, 2005
DURHAM, N.C. - James Earl Jones' commanding bass is so recognizable, even a hermit could place it immediately. It's Mufasa, the papa lion in Disney's hit The Lion King, it's Darth Vader in Star Wars. It has an air of compassion, of wisdom and omnipotence. And yet this Hollywood star spent the better part of his childhood with his mouth closed, plagued by a severe stutter. "It was so bad that I didn't speak at all," Jones, 74, told 200 students at a literacy celebration this week in Durham.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2010
The way South Baltimore businessman Jules Edward "Sonny" Morstein Jr., sees it, he owes something to the community in which his family has prospered. "This city has given me a good life," said Morstein, 65. "How can I not give back?" Nearly 25 years ago, several business owners along South Baltimore's Light Street asked one of their own to help renew their shopping district. Morstein, who runs the city's oldest family-owned jewelry store, stepped into the role of president of the Federal Hill Business Association.
FEATURES
By Laura Lefavor and For The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
If you ever find yourself looking for an excuse to eat more cupcakes, 11-year-old Krissa Hillman has a good one. The fifth-grader from Bollman Bridge Elementary School in Jessup is the creative mastermind behind Cupcakes for Literacy, a business that sells baked goods to benefit local schools, libraries and reading programs. "Literacy is a big part of life. You have to read everything," Hillman said. "So what better way to help people understand than though something everyone likes?"
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 6, 2013
The word was tristeza. It's a disease of citrus trees, but more importantly, for Tobey Roland, it once scored 228 points for him in a game of Scrabble, he said. Roland, 52, of Mount Washington, loves Scrabble and estimates he has played in 120 tournaments, winning eight to 10, since he started playing competitively in 2005. "It's fun and challenging," said Roland, an independent financial investor. "It's really more about probabilities, using premium spots and letters and getting bonuses by using seven-letter words.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2001
CHILDREN'S BOOKS line the North Avenue office of Tom Bowmann, and they're not there for decoration. "I try to read one every day," says Baltimore's first director of reading. "It's amazing how reading a child's book with adult eyes puts a different light on things. It's very helpful in my new job." Bowmann, 50, will need all the help he can get. All he has to do, as prescribed by a school system "Reading by 9" task force in a report issued in May, is get a handle on the city's many reading programs, evaluate them, eliminate the ineffective ones and beef up those that work.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Deborah Bias began taking adult literacy classes last August, and since then the Annapolis resident has vaulted from a kindergarten reading level to third grade, picking up about a thousand words along the way. Her instruction comes courtesy of an individualized tutoring program from the Anne Arundel County Literacy Council, a nonprofit that has offered one-on-one coaching in reading, writing and spelling since 1977. Bias' instruction often involves words on flashcards that she spreads out over a table, glimpses, memorizes, then writes out. Sometimes, she says, she'll become so immersed in learning new words that if her phone rings, the caller is sure to hear "Leave a message.
NEWS
By Doug Miller | July 1, 2014
"Once a librarian, always a librarian," Pattee Fletcher says. Strictly speaking, she was never actually a librarian. But with postgraduate degrees in library and information sciences, she knows a little something about the profession. About nine months ago, the retired college professor and master gardener added a piece to her backyard landscaping through which she shares her passion for books with her neighbors in Long Reach. At first glance, those passing by on the Columbia Association pathway that runs behind Fletcher's house in the Phelps Luck neighborhood might see it as either a very large bird house or an oddly placed doll house.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | June 30, 2014
The new Baltimore schools CEO, Gregory Thornton, starts work Tuesday. And regardless of the outside temperature, he'll be on a hot seat from day one. The challenges facing any urban school district superintendent are super-daunting. In Baltimore, expectations are high in the wake of the reform style and exceptional accomplishments of prior CEO Andrés A. Alonso. Moreover, Mr. Thornton's first-day assignments are a heavy load. To name just a few: budget shortfalls; the $1 billion school construction program; fiscal and authority disputes with charter schools; the controversial teacher evaluation system; and perhaps most fateful, implementation of the rigorous Common Core academic standards and tests.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
The adult literacy nonprofit Baltimore Reads Inc. announced Friday it would cease operations June 30 because of funding problems. Founded in 1988 by then-Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke as part of the "City That Reads" campaign, the organization said it had helped more than 10,000 people learn to read when it celebrated its 25th anniversary last year. It also has taught English as a second language and GED preparation classes. The group lists a staff of 14 on its web site. "This was not a decision made lightly, or without regard to its impact on the community which BRI has served for over 26 years," said Clare Miller, President of Baltimore Reads, Inc. As funding became harder to raise, the group's board sought a partner, without success.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
Hundreds of Harford County residents kicked off the holidays at Barnes & Noble, attending the 4th Annual Cultural Literacy Fair. It was sponsored by the Harford County Human Relations Commission in partnership with Harford County Public Schools and Barnes & Noble. The fair featured interactive cultural displays highlighting various regions of the world where people have relocated, including Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas. Attendees also enjoyed STEM exercises like making ice cream, fingerprints, student performances and appearances by school mascots.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
German Garduno led the commencement procession, and his first steps were a bit out of sync. Who could blame him? The last time the 32-year-old Columbia resident from Mexico attended a graduation of any kind was when he completed ninth grade at age 15. Tuesday night, Garduno joined a half-dozen other adults who received high school diplomas via Project Literacy, a Howard County Library educational initiative. Each took steps into uncharted territory that many adults take for granted — including no more worries about being denied a chance at jobs that require at least a high school diploma.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
Baltimore Reads Executive Director Marlene C. McLaurin took over last month as head of the area's premier literacy organization. McLaurin, 56, most recently was senior executive vice president of United Way of Central Maryland and interim chief operating officer of the Baltimore Urban League. A former second-grade teacher, she earned her bachelor's degree in elementary education from Hampton University in Virginia and her master's degree in early childhood education from Southern Connecticut State College.
NEWS
By Constance Sommer and Constance Sommer,Seattle Post-Intelligencer | March 28, 1999
You wouldn't be reading this story right now if Mark McGwire weren't practically addicted to Starbucks coffee.The guy's been drinking it for 10 years. The home-run world record holder even convinced his team, the St. Louis Cardinals, to serve the coffee in the clubhouse, allowing him to down it in the dugout all season long.McGwire's spokesman can't explain exactly what the attraction is here. But it's the reason why this baseball season, every time McGwire hits a home run, Seattle-based Starbucks will donate $5,000 to a literacy organization in the city where the home run is hit.Last year, McGwire homered 70 times, setting a major league record.
FEATURES
By Laura Lefavor and For The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
If you ever find yourself looking for an excuse to eat more cupcakes, 11-year-old Krissa Hillman has a good one. The fifth-grader from Bollman Bridge Elementary School in Jessup is the creative mastermind behind Cupcakes for Literacy, a business that sells baked goods to benefit local schools, libraries and reading programs. "Literacy is a big part of life. You have to read everything," Hillman said. "So what better way to help people understand than though something everyone likes?"
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 6, 2013
The word was tristeza. It's a disease of citrus trees, but more importantly, for Tobey Roland, it once scored 228 points for him in a game of Scrabble, he said. Roland, 52, of Mount Washington, loves Scrabble and estimates he has played in 120 tournaments, winning eight to 10, since he started playing competitively in 2005. "It's fun and challenging," said Roland, an independent financial investor. "It's really more about probabilities, using premium spots and letters and getting bonuses by using seven-letter words.
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