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BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | January 23, 1994
Q: I am working with a real estate agent to find a new house. The agent has suggested that perhaps she serve as a "buyer's agent." I did not realize there was any difference between agents. And what are "dual agents"?A: Traditionally, a real estate agent is hired by the seller of a property. This agent is usually referred to as the "listing agent."If another real estate agent assists the buyer in finding the property, this other agent may be referred to as the "selling agent."The selling agent is a sub-agent of the listing agent and works for, and is paid by, the seller.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Picture a Victorian mansion in move-in condition that could function as a bed-and-breakfast, a home for a growing family, or just a place for anyone hankering for a bygone time. This 19th-century home at 114 Washington Ave. in Chestertown on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay fits the bill. "What I like best about the house is the enthusiasm with which the owners researched [the home's history] and tried to restore it as authentically as they could," said Terry Stafford, an agent with Keller Williams American Premier Realty LLC and the listing agent for the property, which is priced at $675,000.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Picture a Victorian mansion in move-in condition that could function as a bed-and-breakfast, a home for a growing family, or just a place for anyone hankering for a bygone time. This 19th-century home at 114 Washington Ave. in Chestertown on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay fits the bill. "What I like best about the house is the enthusiasm with which the owners researched [the home's history] and tried to restore it as authentically as they could," said Terry Stafford, an agent with Keller Williams American Premier Realty LLC and the listing agent for the property, which is priced at $675,000.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
Not everybody who might stop at a real estate open house would commit a Sunday afternoon during football season to the trip, or get in the car on a snowy afternoon just to see a house devoid of furniture. After all, clicking online, buyers can view dozens of homes in the time it takes to attend a single open house. But in a market littered with unsold houses, buyers might be game to attend an open house with good food or face-painting, or consider making an appointment to see a house recommended by a friend who attended a lavish VIP party there.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | January 10, 1993
As a home seller, are you the victim of a ducking agent?After your home had been on the market for several months, did your agent go incommunicado -- failing even to call you back when you leave an earnest message?Real estate experts dub the problem -- which drives some sellers wild with frustration -- as "call reluctance." They say it often sets in after a house has languished on the market for several months and the listing agent has little good news to offer."You know that you should be calling that valuable client and yet you can't get your hand moving over to press those seven digits to call him," says Gene Gallagher, broker-owner of ERA Gallagher Realty in Bethesda.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | June 20, 1993
It's a muggy summer night and the message captured by your home answering machine is disconcerting: "Hi, This is Tammy, your real estate agent. I'm off on a cruise for two weeks. Call you when I get back. Click."If your home has been on the market for a while and its sale is crucial to the pursuit of your life plans, the last thing you want is a listing agent who drops the ball due to a summer vacation, realty specialists say."It's important to keep your property alive during the summer. You water your lawn in the summer.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | September 6, 1992
The house was an elegantly appointed Cape Cod in Clarksville with a Waterford crystal chandelier in the foyer, a cedar shake roof and professional landscaping. And it sold in just one day.Did it help that the listing agent, Pamela Shaw of Coldwell Banker, was so enamored of the house she would have bought it herself? That's a real possibility, realty specialists say."If you like a house yourself, you're going to be more excited about selling it than if you think it's a dog," says Gaye Rittenhouse, a sales associate with the Century 21 chain in Catonsville.
BUSINESS
By JONATHAN A. AZRAEL | December 3, 2000
Dear Mr. Azrael: I put a contract in on a second home in Ocean City. There were absolutely no exclusions listed on the multiple listing that we had printed out. We put in a bid at the listing price. We had pre-approval from the mortgage company. The listing agent informed us that the owner would not even consider signing the contract until after they had a complete mortgage approval from us. We got that done. The listing agent [then] sent over a copy of the multiple listing, showing exclusions from the sale that clearly had been typed in, and were not in the original listing information.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 30, 2005
It could be coincidence. It could be collusion. Either way, a typical American house sale involves a 5 percent real estate commission, and two federal agencies wonder why. In an open forum last week with members of the National Association of Realtors and their critics in Washington, the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department tiptoed around that touchy topic. An estimated 82 percent of American home sellers hire realty agents to supervise the transactions, with "the vast majority" choosing full-service brokers, said James C. Cooper, a Federal Trade Commission spokesman.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | February 23, 1992
How come there's so little discount competition in real estate commissions? When you sell your house, all the brokers in your area generally charge the same amount. You typically pay 6 percent to 7 percent of the selling price (in some cities, you're charged less on the percentage of the sale price that exceeds $100,000).If the real estate industry were truly competitive, some brokers would undercut others to get your business, especially in lean times, when houses are not selling well.In some areas it's happening.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Hopkins Smith | March 7, 2008
Would-be buyers in the market for an agent as well as a house should choose just as carefully as a seller. Stephen Brobeck, executive director of the Consumer Federation of America, suggests using a real estate broker whose office works exclusively with buyers. You might not get great service when a Realtor's loyalty is divided between you and colleagues working with sellers, he says. An "exclusive buyer agent" works in an office that does not take listings. The great majority of agents work with sellers as well as buyers, though you can find "buyer agents" who deal only with buyers but are based in an office that also sells.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2008
When the Rodgers Forge townhouse went on sale, dozens of people showed up for the open house. The next day, a prospective buyer toured the home and quickly made an offer. Within hours, the seller had a signed contract, for close to the asking price. Such a fast-paced sale would have been business as usual two or three years ago during an overheated housing market. But today, selling fast is a rarity. Home sales have plummeted, values are flat or falling, and homes languish on the market month after month, waiting for buyers who never seem to show up. In a slumping market where homes linger, on average, more than three months, a small percentage of houses are still selling quickly.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 30, 2005
It could be coincidence. It could be collusion. Either way, a typical American house sale involves a 5 percent real estate commission, and two federal agencies wonder why. In an open forum last week with members of the National Association of Realtors and their critics in Washington, the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department tiptoed around that touchy topic. An estimated 82 percent of American home sellers hire realty agents to supervise the transactions, with "the vast majority" choosing full-service brokers, said James C. Cooper, a Federal Trade Commission spokesman.
BUSINESS
By From staff reports | August 3, 2003
John J. Heyn recently was elected chairman of the Maryland State Commission of Real Estate Appraisers and Home Inspectors. The commission regulates appraisers and inspectors. Its 15 members are volunteers. Heyan is a past president of the American Society of Home Inspectors. Prudential Realtors announce top agents Prudential Carruthers Realtors announced its top agents for June: Eastport: Karen Clarke as top listing agent; Alice Osborne as top sales agent and top producer. Million-in-a-Month Awards went to Osborne, Diana Smith and The Orton Team.
BUSINESS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
Joseph and Mary Steneman never considered the traditional option of listing with a Realtor when they wanted to sell their home and buy a larger one. Instead, they went the route of "for sale by owner," and successfully sold their Canton home within weeks of putting it on the market. They are not alone in a housing market that has tilted toward sell- ers. A recent National Association of Realtors survey of 5,700 homes sold nationwide found that about 17 percent were for-sale-by-owner transactions.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | April 7, 2002
ALREADY unpopular with consumers and under legal scrutiny by federal investigators, so-called "transaction fees" by real estate brokers are attracting an even tougher set of critics: sales agents themselves. Transaction fees - also known as "administration" or "regulatory compliance" fees - have been introduced by many brokerages during the past 18 months. Often ranging from $250 to $595, they are surcharges to homebuyers and sellers on top of the regular 6 percent or 7 percent sales commissions.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
Not everybody who might stop at a real estate open house would commit a Sunday afternoon during football season to the trip, or get in the car on a snowy afternoon just to see a house devoid of furniture. After all, clicking online, buyers can view dozens of homes in the time it takes to attend a single open house. But in a market littered with unsold houses, buyers might be game to attend an open house with good food or face-painting, or consider making an appointment to see a house recommended by a friend who attended a lavish VIP party there.
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | April 17, 1994
Q: Are there local lenders or mortgage companies that provide mortgages without any settlement costs?M. Goldberg, ReisterstownA: Many local and national lenders with Maryland branch offices offer home equity loans between $5,000 and $100,000 with a choice of either a full waiver or a rebate of all closing costs based upon account usage.Also there are some other local lenders who offer "no cost" or "low cost" first mortgage loan programs. And the FHA and VA offer "streamlined refinance" programs with little or no settlement costs.
BUSINESS
By JONATHAN A. AZRAEL | December 3, 2000
Dear Mr. Azrael: I put a contract in on a second home in Ocean City. There were absolutely no exclusions listed on the multiple listing that we had printed out. We put in a bid at the listing price. We had pre-approval from the mortgage company. The listing agent informed us that the owner would not even consider signing the contract until after they had a complete mortgage approval from us. We got that done. The listing agent [then] sent over a copy of the multiple listing, showing exclusions from the sale that clearly had been typed in, and were not in the original listing information.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1999
When the NFL free-agent market reopens Tuesday morning, the Ravens will be shopping for a veteran wide receiver or a defensive tackle as possible starters, and maybe a veteran linebacker or safety who can fill out the special teams.Teams get salary-cap breaks by waiting until June 1 to release players, but the Ravens are not expected to cut any notable players, as they did last year in terminating the remainder of quarterback Vinny Testaverde's multi-year contract.But Ozzie Newsome, the Ravens' vice president of player personnel, said the team is a "million plus" under the salary cap and in good shape to make some moves if certain players become available.
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