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Lisa Anderson

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NEWS
October 28, 1991
Dr. Lisa Anderson has joined Annapolis Opticians as the firm's in-house optometrist. A specialist in contact lens fitting and low-vision problems, she also sees patients at the Johns Hopkins Low Vision Service in Baltimore.Anderson recently completed a one-year fellowship program at Johns Hopkins, and is interested in expanding Annapolis Opticians' services to low-vision patients, working in conjunction with owner Doug Corby, who specializes in glasses for people with low vision.A member of the American Optometric Association, Anderson lives in Columbia with her husband.
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NEWS
October 28, 1991
Dr. Lisa Anderson has joined Annapolis Opticians as the firm's in-house optometrist. A specialist in contact lens fitting and low-vision problems, she also sees patients at the Johns Hopkins Low Vision Service in Baltimore.Anderson recently completed a one-year fellowship program at Johns Hopkins, and is interested in expanding Annapolis Opticians' services to low-vision patients, working in conjunction with owner Doug Corby, who specializes in glasses for people with low vision.A member of the American Optometric Association, Anderson lives in Columbia with her husband.
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NEWS
July 28, 1995
County narcotics detectives seized 146 grams of suspected marijuana Wednesday evening and arrested five people during a raid on a house in Odenton, county police said yesterday.Detectives and tactical team officers entered the house in the 400 block of Greenwood Street about 7:30 p.m. They found five people in a downstairs bedroom, along with 20 individually packed bags of suspected marijuana, a digital scale, several pipes and a loaded .22-caliber revolver, police said.All of those arrested were charged with possession with intent to distribute marijuana and possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
Lionel Landry, an author, language scholar and retired State Department employee, died of bladder cancer Wednesday at his Chestertown home. He was 86. Mr. Landry, a Rhode Island native, contracted polio when he was 3 and used a cane all his life, his family said. He developed a love for classical music and languages. He graduated from Providence College in 1940 and earned a master's degree from Harvard University in Romance languages a year later. Mr. Landry, who was fluent in Spanish and French, taught English at the Centro Colombo-Americano for the U.S. State Department during World War II. He then became an assistant professor of Romance languages at Georgetown University.
FEATURES
By WESLEY MORRIS and WESLEY MORRIS,THE BOSTON GLOBE | February 27, 2006
It's probably useful to think of Madea's Family Reunion as a department store. There's something for almost anybody. Shopping for a paperback melodrama? It's on the first floor. Looking for a gospel sermon? Try the third. Bawdy physical comedy? The cellar, obviously. Some parts of Tyler Perry's new movie are better than others - and all of it is better than Diary of a Mad Black Woman, his last one. Perry wrote, directed, produced, and scored Family Reunion and plays three characters in the film.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The turmoil in Algeria confronts the United States with the same unhappy choice it faces elsewhere in the Middle East: Groping moves toward democracy may yield an anti-American product more frightening than what they replace.This dilemma was evident yesterday in the U.S. response to Algeria's weekend military takeover and cancellation of Thursday's runoff elections in the face of an impending victory at the polls by Islamic fundamentalists.The U.S. reaction fell short of the ringing support for democracy that U.S. officials have directed elsewhere.
NEWS
By LISA ANDERSON and LISA ANDERSON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 19, 2005
HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Although he denied that the concept of "intelligent design" advances any religious belief, a leading proponent of the idea has said it is less plausible to those who question or deny the existence of God, according to presentations made in federal court here yesterday. Michael Behe, a tenured biochemist at Lehigh University, took the stand for a second day as the first expert witness called by the defense in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District. Entering its fourth week, the suit was brought against the district and school board by 11 parents of Dover students over a requirement that ninth-grade biology students be informed of intelligent design as a scientific alternative to evolution and referred to an intelligent design textbook, Of Pandas and People.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
Hurricane Floyd shut down the Anne Arundel County Fair in Crownsville today for the first time in its 47-year history.The storm's high winds, the governor's declaration of a state of emergency and the announcement that county schools would be closed today helped in the decision, said fair manager John Kozenski Jr.Kozenski also recalled that keeping the fair open at Sandy Point State Park during a storm several years ago proved to be a disaster because tents...
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
Hurricane Floyd shut down the Anne Arundel County Fair in Crownsville today for the first time in its 47-year history.The storm's high winds, the governor's declaration of a state of emergency and the announcement that county schools would be closed today helped in the decision, said fair manager John Kozenski Jr.Kozenski also recalled that keeping the fair open at Sandy Point State Park during a storm several years ago proved to be a disaster as tents were...
NEWS
By LISA ANDERSON and LISA ANDERSON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 18, 2005
HARRISBURG, PA. -- A Pennsylvania biochemist testified in federal court yesterday that "intelligent design," a view critical of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution, is a scientific theory that doesn't require involvement of a supernatural agent, although he said he believes the intelligent designer was God. With Matthew Chapman, a great-great-grandson of Darwin looking on, Lehigh University professor Michael Behe testified as the first witness for...
NEWS
By LISA ANDERSON AND KIRSTEN SCHARNBERG and LISA ANDERSON AND KIRSTEN SCHARNBERG,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 7, 2005
NEW YORK -- Police, counterterrorism teams and special emergency response units fanned out across the city yesterday afternoon as the mayor announced the first specific and credible terrorist threat to New York City's vast subway system and its 4.5 million daily riders. Urging New Yorkers to avoid entering subways with briefcases, baby strollers, backpacks and other containers that could conceal explosives, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg also sought their help. "We ask that the public remain vigilant.
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