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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
City health officials want to strip the licenses of dozens of liquor stores in predominantly poor Baltimore neighborhoods, linking the outlets to higher levels of violent crime. Health and planning officials said Friday that they will use a citywide rezoning effort to force some stores that don't conform to current law to move, shut or change their offerings. "Clearly alcohol and violence are two of the major issues affecting the city," said Dr. Oxiris Barbot, city health commissioner, who is helping to lead the effort against the stores.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
When Michelle Ha came to the United States in 1980, she dreamed of getting a college degree and returning to South Korea to become a politician. That didn't happen, but she's still serving her community. From the liquor store she runs in a downtrodden part of East Baltimore, she works as a liaison to other Korean-American-owned businesses, a minder of children and seniors and an organizer of many large holiday meals. Ha also does her part to deter crime, police and neighbors say. "A lot of business owners make money in the city and don't support the community, but that's not me," said Ha from her Kay's Liquor and Convenience, in the 2400 block of Biddle St. "Now the city wants to take my life away.
NEWS
June 18, 2012
The dozens of liquor stores located in Baltimore's residential neighborhoods are unquestionably harmful to the city. Besides being a drag on property values and in many cases a contributor to blight, these stores, grandfathered in under older, looser zoning regulations, are a threat to public health. Not only is their presence associated with the medical problems of alcohol abuse but Johns Hopkins researchers have also found a link between these stores and increased violent crime. Baltimore health and planning officials are well justified in making their reduction or elimination a top goal.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 11, 2012
Update:  In an email Friday, drama teacher Maura Morrison said Thursday night's show was standing room only with people turned away from the 900-seat auditorium. “Wegmans' executives were there and were wildly supportive of our show,” Morrison wrote. She added that the local Wegmans provided shirts, hats, signs and a paper towel display for the zero-budget class project. “They never asked to see the script. They had a real sense of humor about it all.” Wegmanshas built a loyal following with mega supermarkets known for gourmet cheeses, French patisseries, European-style cafes and attentive service.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
If local pharmacists could write the regulations, Marylanders probably wouldn't ever have been allowed to get their prescriptions filled at chain stores like Walgreens and Rite-Aid. Independent video stores probably would have liked to outlaw Blockbuster, just as small bookstore owners probably would have been just as happy if the state had a ban on Barnes & Noble. (For that matter, Blockbuster might like an injunction against Netflix and Barnes & Noble on Amazon.com.) And most of all, Main Street merchants everywhere would probably love a world where Walmart was illegal.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
Unlike most other states, Maryland shoppers have to make one extra stop for a cabernet to go with that steak they bought on sale at the supermarket —grocery stores in the state are generally banned from selling alcohol. Increasingly, though, grocery chains like Wegmans and Harris Teeter are trying to find ways around the prohibition, drawing pushback from Maryland's powerful liquor lobby and package goods stores but support from consumers hoping for easier food-and-wine pairings.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater | March 19, 2012
Baltimore City Councilman Nick J. Mosby (D-District 7) plans to introduce legislation Monday that would ban liquor store owners from selling non-alcoholic goods to people under 21. Mosby said the purpose of the legislation is to prevent teens in Baltimore from developing a habit of entering liquor stores to buy items. He said entering liquor stores is already "normalized" behavior for city youth, and banning the practice could create a demand for other stores to open in city neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2012
Pratt Street Ale House will be twice its size by April 6, part-owner Justin Dvorkin said Thursday afternoon. Dvorkin was at the Baltimore Liquor Board, where he successfully lobbied to expand his brewpub's liquor license to include the space next door, which once housed The Nest and Downtown Sports Exchange. Pratt Street has been working on an expansion for a year , since it started leasing the space that had been vacated by The Nest. Though the occassional private party had been held there, Dvorkin promises the expansion will give it a full face-lift.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2012
Several Howard County restaurant owners are lobbying for the right to sell refillable containers of beer and wine to dine-in customers, but the plan has raised concerns from the owners of a liquor store that the sales would result in irresponsible drinking. Corinne Gorzo, who co-owns Glenwood Wine and Spirits with her husband, John, spoke out against refillable containers to state lawmakers, voicing concern about potential sanitation and safety issues resulting from customers drinking to excess.
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