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Liquor Store

EXPLORE
July 2, 2012
The following is compiled from police reports. It is the Baltimore Messenger's policy to include descriptions only when there is enough information to make identification possible. If you have any information about these crimes, call the Baltimore City Police Department's Northern District at 410-396-2455. Bellemore Road 100 block, between 4:40 and 6 a.m. June 27. Giant and Trek mountain bikes stolen from garage. Entry gained through window. West Belvedere Avenue 2400 block, between noon and 1:10 p.m. June 25. Laptop stolen from unlocked vehicle.
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NEWS
June 29, 2012
I am in total agreement with writer Julius Colon's letter about the problem of nonconforming liquor stores in Baltimore ("Park Heights wants fewer liquor stores," June 26). His warning about the proliferation of liquor stores in his community and the perception that they contribute to the erosion of the quality of life, increased drug activity and crime is reminiscent of the handwriting on the wall in South Central Los Angeles 20 years ago that lead to the worst riots in the city's history.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 27, 2012
Baltimore health officials and people who live in some of the city's poorest neighborhoods want to see a bunch of liquor stores go away; there are too many of them concentrated in certain parts of town, and many of them have operated in violation of zoning codes for years. So it's time for a change. You look at some of these stores and — no offense to their owners — you think: Don't people in these neighborhoods deserve better, or at least something else? The liquor store, sometimes the only retailer of any kind for blocks of west or east Baltimore, is a symbol of the old, poor and unhealthy city that is finally getting attention after years of civic focus on downtown and the waterfront.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Outside West Baltimore's Penn Station Liquors, folks say the store is no place for children. Only a block away from Westside Elementary School, Penn Station is one of four liquor businesses within feet of each other on North Fulton Street. Youngsters sometimes wander in to buy candy, soda and chips - stocked next to the alcohol, flavored cigars and sex pills. "Kids don't belong here," says Pauline White, 50, who lives nearby. "When people start drinking, they get crazy. " On Monday, the City Council overwhelmingly voted to pass a bill, championed by freshman Councilman Nick Mosby, to make it illegal for liquor stores to sell anything to minors, including seemingly innocuous goods such as snacks or T-shirts.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
Baltimore's effort to rein in non-conforming liquor stores is welcome news in Park Heights ("Better health through zoning," June 19). In the Park Heights Master Plan area, we have the highest density of liquor establishments in Maryland. When I drive around the neighborhood at night, the only undesirable activity I see is always near liquor stores. We have non-conforming liquor store in the middle of residential areas that undercut the whole notion of safe, secure neighborhoods.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
Regarding your article about the city's plan to strip some liquor stores of their licenses, many studies have shown that communities with greater densities of alcohol outlets have higher levels of drinking, unintentional injuries and violence ("Baltimore to strip some liquor stores of licenses in rezoning effort," June 18). Specifically, published data about Baltimore show not only an inequitable distribution of liquor stores in predominantly African-American and low-income communities but also significant associations between the presence of liquor stores and the risk of health-related problems.
NEWS
June 23, 2012
Baltimore City's plan to close 128 liquor stores is an incredibly misguided decision ("City targets liquor stores," June 18). While the city's leaders should be commended for finding ways to lessen crime, their solution does little more than rob 128 small business owners of their livelihood. Are there liquor stores that exacerbate crime and produce other problems in their neighborhoods? Absolutely. Are there 128 such establishments? Absolutely not. Liquor stores do not cause crime, nor does their existence in poor neighborhoods (which count for the resounding majority of neighborhoods where closures are intended)
NEWS
June 22, 2012
The city health officials who plan to strip non-conforming liquor stores of their licenses because of a Johns Hopkins University study linking them to violent crime may be confusing correlation with causation ("City targets liquor stores", June 18). The distinction is important, because if the liquor stores aren't what's causing the crime, then closing them won't cause it to drop and could even exacerbate the problem. Vacant properties, for example, also correlate with violent crime.
NEWS
June 18, 2012
The Columbia Wegmans' liquor license application should be denied for: 1) violating state law, 2) violating county zoning 3) eroding the business viability of the neighboring Columbia Villages and 4) inconsistency with Howard County's general plan. Maryland state law requires retail liquor operations to be separate from grocery and chain stores. Wegmans is obviously both, and their application is a blatant attempt to circumvent the existing law. Liquor retailers statewide are rightfully incensed that the rules under which their businesses were started and grew are about to be swept away.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
The owner of a Frankford liquor store was sentenced Monday to 18 months in prison and six months of subsequent home detention for tax evasion after he understated the store's earnings by more than $1.5 million and structured bank deposits specifically to avoid IRS inquiries, according to prosecutors. Chung K. Choi, 47, of Woodbine, the owner of Frankford Garden Liquors in the 5400 block of Sinclair Lane, filed corporate tax returns from 2006 to 2009 that understated earnings at the store by $1,572,162, according to Maryland U.S. AttorneyRod J. Rosenstein.
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