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NEWS
June 3, 2011
Decker's in Bel Air won't be selling beer, wine or liquor for at least the next seven months. As a penalty for improper record-keeping and purchasing liquor from someone other than a licensed wholesaler, members of the Harford County Liquor Control Board Wednesday suspended the license for the liquor store for 30 days. That was followed by the board revoking the license for making a false application for a liquor license renewal. The licensees of the store, Joseph Borromeo, a 75 percent owner, and Virgil Dale Davis, a 25 percent owner, can never apply for a liquor license in Harford County again.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
If a hotly debated Federal Hill beer garden were to open in time for Oktoberfest, it would have to do so without the beer. By a 2-1 vote Thursday, Baltimore's liquor board declared invalid a liquor license for Crossbar Der Biergarten, saying it expired in 2009 and the owners would not get a "hardship extension. " "The sale of liquor is a privilege, not a right," said board chairman Thomas Ward, who called past extensions of the proposed bar's license "illegal" decisions that the current board had a "duty to correct.
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NEWS
June 18, 2012
The Columbia Wegmans' liquor license application should be denied for: 1) violating state law, 2) violating county zoning 3) eroding the business viability of the neighboring Columbia Villages and 4) inconsistency with Howard County's general plan. Maryland state law requires retail liquor operations to be separate from grocery and chain stores. Wegmans is obviously both, and their application is a blatant attempt to circumvent the existing law. Liquor retailers statewide are rightfully incensed that the rules under which their businesses were started and grew are about to be swept away.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
With new Peruvian joints popping up just about every other week (or so it seems), the flavors of Latin and South America are all the rage. But just because they're trendy doesn't mean the cuisines of Latin countries are new to the Baltimore food scene. Tucked into an unremarkable strip mall in Woodlawn, Salsa Grill has been quietly and successfully cranking out quality Latin American food for more than two decades. Scene & Decor From the outside, Salsa Grill looks just like one more storefront in an average shopping center.
EXPLORE
March 4, 2013
Jake's WayBack Burgers, which opened in October in the Festival, just received its liquor license to serve beer. Owners Joe and Patty Borowski are local Harford County residents. Joe was facing a layoff as a draftsman and decided to take his family's future in his own hands and open Jake's with his wife and son. Patty is a local nurse. Jake's employs 21 people and does several school fundraisers along with other fundraisers in the community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
More than three years after first filing for a liquor license transfer and almost two years after opening their restaurant, the owners of Meet 27 are closer to overcoming opposition from a small group of neighbors. The decision, from the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, went largely in favor of the Remington restaurant, which has been embroiled in what the court described as a "long-running dispute between a Baltimore City restaurant and its neighbors. " The court disagreed with a lower court ruling that went the neighbors' way.  The upper court determined that the Board of Liquor License Commissioners of Baltimore City, commonly known as the Baltimore City Liquor Board, was within its rights when it granted the transfer to Meet 27 in August 2010 after first denying it two months earlier.
EXPLORE
August 10, 2012
The decision regarding the liquor license at the Wegmans store by the Howard County Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board is absurd and infuriating ("No license for liquor store at Wegmans," Aug. 2.) The only purpose Maryland's liquor laws serve is protectionism. and this decision certainly smacks of protectionism. The board's reasons for rejection are spurious: • "Not necessary for the accommodation of the public…" I would find the ability to purchased alcoholic beverages while parked at Wegmans very convenient.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Meet 27 still doesn't have a liquor license. The new Remington restaurant had been approved for a Class B license by the Baltimore City Liquor License Board, but petitioners affiliated with a splinter neighborhood association have successfully petitioned to have that approval reversed. For the time being, Meet 27 will operate as a BYOB, its owners say. The owners, who include Richard D'Souza and Paul Goldberg, are appealing a ruling handed down today by W. Michel Pierson that denied their request to have the original decision remanded back to the liquor board for review.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 25, 2014
Based on some of the back and forth at a liquor license hearing for a proposed wine bar in Bel Air, it seems there is some confusion about the role of the liquor board when it comes to regulation. Lawyer Jay Young correctly pointed out that the buying and selling of alcoholic beverages is strictly regulated. In Young's words: "It's not like opening up a candy store. " In representing owners of other liquor stores, who have objections to a potential competitor being licensed, Young went on to draw an erroneous conclusion in saying the liquor board has a responsibility to help liquor licensees protect their substantial investments.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, Baltimore Sun reporter | April 22, 2010
Baltimore's liquor board renewed the license of a downtown nightclub at a hearing Thursday, dismissing claims by several surrounding hotels that the bar is the site of late-night noise and unruly behavior. The Velvet Rope had been targeted by police and a quasi-city agency two months ago after a near-riot following a hip-hop concert and a shooting near the club, in the 200 block of E. Redwood St. Although the club's licensee reached an agreement with the police commissioner to curb the problems, three of the surrounding hotels led a petition to have the Velvet Rope's liquor license revoked.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Brew House No. 16, a "gastropub" planning to open in Mount Vernon this fall, will focus on locally sourced Chesapeake-inspired cuisine, according to Marion Winik, the bar and restaurant's vice president of marketing. The North Calvert Street location - which will be run by the father-son team of Harry and brewmaster Ian Hummel - will also feature an on-site microbrewery that will serve patrons international and American styles of beer. Brew House No. 16 will operate out of a former firehouse, and part of the bar's name is the station's old number.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
In Like Flynn Tavern, the Irish bar that replaced J. Patrick's Pub in Locust Point, opened on June 7. The neighborhood has already been “super supportive” of the new restaurant, according to general manager Cora Flynn. Some patrons came in three or four times the first week of operation, she said. More than a year and a half in the making, In Like Flynn's route to open was not usual. In early January 2013, Steve O'Donnell, a rookie to the restaurant business, purchased the Andre Street location (and its liquor license)
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Over the years the residents of Washington Hill have brought back to life a neighborhood on the brink of decay to one that is a thriving, attractive place to live. However, in an effort to support and protect our neighborhood's continued progress and growth, we face a stumbling block created by a loophole in the city's zoning law that continues to impede our progress and harm the citizens of Baltimore. I recently endured a grueling six-and-a-half-hour wait to file a protest against the renewal of a non-conforming Class A establishment's liquor license in our neighborhood.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The city liquor board has agreed to let the owner of Club Voltage keep his liquor license, reversing an earlier ruling, on the condition that he not open a bar at the same Southeast Baltimore location. The Board of Liquor License Commissioners said Thursday that owner Louis J. Principio III could keep the potentially lucrative license as long as he does not use it at the site of the huge dance club at the Baltimore Travel Plaza on O'Donnell Street. The board revoked the license in March after complaints about the club inside the old Greyhound bus terminal, including a Dec. 2 shooting on the dance floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Rocco's Capriccio will not be reopened as a restaurant, according to the new owner of the Fawn Street property that housed the restaurant. The buyer, Howard Shapiro, said he plans to instead convert it into his private residence. Rocco's closure in May of last year coincided with the closing of two other traditional Italian restaurants in Little Italy, Caesar's Den and Della Notte. The former Caesar's Den restaurant, including its liquor license, is on the market for an undisclosed asking price.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
Ze Mean Bean Cafe, a popular Eastern European-styled, Fells Point restaurant, had its liquor license revoked by the city's liquor board Thursday, the board chairman said. Baltimore City Liquor License Board Chairman Steve Fogleman said Thursday evening that the bar had committed two violations - not cooperating with inspectors and serving alcohol without picking up their 2013 liquor license from the board. A chef at the restaurant did not appear at a hearing in front of the board as required, he said.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
With a tight budget anticipated in the coming year, Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen plans to look at possible increases to municipal fees. While saying he wants to avoid raising property taxes, Cohen said that he plans a broad review of the city's entire fee structure, with a close look at another hike to the city's liquor license fees. "His sort of philosophy is that you should pay for the service that you're given," said Philip McGowan, a spokesman for Cohen, a Democrat. "The mayor has said we need to look at things across the board and say, 'Is the fee commensurate with what it costs to put out the service?
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
After more than a year of negotiations, two community groups reached an agreement Thursday with Sweet Sin Bakery and Cafe owner Richard D'Souza, who can now serve drinks at his Remington restaurant, but has agreed to close at earlier hours. D'Souza's bid for a liquor license failed last month, but the agreement reached with the Charles Village Civic Association and the Greater Remington Improvement Association revived his plan. The compromise requires him to stop serving alcohol at 10:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and close at 11 p.m. On weekends, Sweet Sin must stop serving alcohol at 12:30 a.m. and close at 1 a.m. The Baltimore Board of Liquor License Commissioners approved the plan Thursday.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
The city vetoed plans Tuesday for a proposed open-air beer garden across from Cross Street Market in Federal Hill, but one of the owners says it'll open by Oktoberfest. "There will be a beer garden there come October," said the Crossbar owner, Brian McComas, who also owns Ryleigh's Oyster. How exactly he plans to make that happen isn't clear. The proposed beer garden in the first block of East Cross Street, which has been hotly contested by neighbors in the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association, was granted an expanded liquor license from the city's liquor board last week.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 25, 2014
Based on some of the back and forth at a liquor license hearing for a proposed wine bar in Bel Air, it seems there is some confusion about the role of the liquor board when it comes to regulation. Lawyer Jay Young correctly pointed out that the buying and selling of alcoholic beverages is strictly regulated. In Young's words: "It's not like opening up a candy store. " In representing owners of other liquor stores, who have objections to a potential competitor being licensed, Young went on to draw an erroneous conclusion in saying the liquor board has a responsibility to help liquor licensees protect their substantial investments.
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