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NEWS
November 29, 2010
In response to Annie Linskey's "More access to wine on the table" (Nov. 25) we are pleased that our elected officials are finally willing to seriously consider bringing Maryland into the modern era. Were the arguments espoused by the wholesale liquor lobbyists legitimate in opposition to the direct shipping of wine to consumers, we certainly would have seen some evidence thus far in the other states. Their skies have not yet fallen! In an effort to be fair to both wineries and retailers, we have fought hard to include both in any shipping legislation and to treat in-state and out-of-state interests the same.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 25, 2014
Based on some of the back and forth at a liquor license hearing for a proposed wine bar in Bel Air, it seems there is some confusion about the role of the liquor board when it comes to regulation. Lawyer Jay Young correctly pointed out that the buying and selling of alcoholic beverages is strictly regulated. In Young's words: "It's not like opening up a candy store. " In representing owners of other liquor stores, who have objections to a potential competitor being licensed, Young went on to draw an erroneous conclusion in saying the liquor board has a responsibility to help liquor licensees protect their substantial investments.
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NEWS
December 6, 2010
It probably came as no surprise to Chef Bryan Voltaggio that when Robert M. Parker Jr., the country's leading wine critic and a Baltimore County resident, came to dine at his VOLT restaurant in Frederick last November, he brought wine from his own cellar. Selections like a 1982 Cheval Blanc St.-Emilion (which retails for about $1,000, if you can find it) aren't usually available on restaurant wine lists. But when the influential Mr. Parker gushed over the quality of the 21-course meal that ranged from goat cheese ravioli to squab with Brussels sprouts in his newsletter, "Hedonist's Gazette," this spring, it was Mr. Voltaggio who almost got stuck with the bill.
NEWS
December 9, 2013
Betty Buck missed a great opportunity with her commentary ("The failed experiment of Prohibition," Dec. 5). While there are plenty of things learned from Prohibition, I found her offering to reveal none of them and that instead it was a nice, but poorly disguised, pat on her organization's back. Her organization, the Maryland Beer Wholesalers Association, probably has more interest in keeping the status quo than fighting alcohol abuse, unsafe alcohol, decreased respect for the law and other things mentioned.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
The owners of Rudys' 2900 in Finksburg have asked local lawmakers to change Carroll liquor laws to allow the restaurant to close for lunch, a meal that has not been profitable.The elegant restaurant on Route 140 near Route 91 never has done a brisk lunch business, co-owner Rudolph Speckamp said.But the establishment, popular with residents throughout the Baltimore area, does well at dinner time. Rudys' has the third-highest gross sales of Carroll restaurants with liquor licenses, said liquor board Administrator J. Ronald Lau.Liquor board records show Rudys' gross sales were about $1 million in 1992.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | January 22, 1995
Carroll County's state lawmakers have put liquor law changes on hold for at least a year, saying the county's liquor board presented its package too late to be considered in the current General Assembly session."
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | September 19, 2006
Economic development officials hope to lure new restaurants to Baltimore-area jurisdictions by loosening Prohibition-era liquor laws that have limited entrepreneurs from selling spirits in several establishments. County and state officials during the past two years have worked to allow restaurateurs to obtain multiple liquor licenses to encourage more development in areas such as Glen Burnie, Randallstown and parts of Howard County. Anne Arundel County officials, for example, began a marketing effort this summer highlighting recent liquor-law changes in hopes of snaring a few dozen new restaurants.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1999
State legislators are scrutinizing liquor laws and talking with business leaders hoping to find a way to hand out multiple licenses to some establishments in Anne Arundel County.Currently, a restaurant with a license to serve drinks in, for example, Parole, may not get a license to sell alcohol at a second restaurant in the northern part of the county around Baltimore-Washington International Airport.A new study group, headed by Dels. John Leopold and Theodore Sophocleus, could help restaurant chains that want to do business at several places in the county and spur development in areas such as near the airport eager for new businesses.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Annapolis Bureau | March 16, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The Sons of Italy have a problem with their new lodge in Little Italy.Facing a longtime ban on new liquor licenses in SoutheastBaltimore, the lodge fathers have had to trek to City Hall every week to get a one-day liquor license for their weekly dinners and monthly meetings.To the rescue comes their senator, American Joe Miedusiewski, who introduced a bill in the General Assembly carving an exception in state law to give the lodge a permanent license.The special-interest legislation is nothing unusual.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
The owners of Rudys' 2900 in Finksburg have asked local lawmakers to change Carroll liquor laws to allow the restaurant to close for lunch, a meal that has not been profitable.The elegant restaurant on Route 140 near Route 91 never has done a brisk lunch business, co-owner Rudolph Speckamp said.But the establishment, popular with residents throughout the Baltimore area, does well at dinner time. Rudys' has the third-highest gross sales of Carroll restaurants with liquor licenses, said liquor board Administrator J. Ronald Lau.Liquor board records show Rudys' gross sales in 1992, the most recent year for which numbers are available, were about $1 million.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Baltimore's liquor board is reforming the way it does business - cutting staff, adding supervision and imposing new work rules - after a state audit revealed a lax work ethic and spotty enforcement, its chairman told lawmakers Tuesday. "We're changing everything," Stephan Fogleman, chairman of the Baltimore City Board of Liquor License Commissioners, said at a hearing in Annapolis. A recent audit uncovered widespread problems with the liquor board, a hybrid state-city agency criticized by current and former workers as a vestige of political patronage.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Here's the gist of what legislative auditors discovered when they recently evaluated Baltimore's liquor board: It is doing a lousy job. And here's a short summary of the liquor board's response: Yup. It would be shocking if it weren't so predictable. Does anyone living in this city believe the Baltimore Board of Liquor License Commissioners has ever done an adequate job of overseeing businesses that sell alcohol? Maybe a few former commissioners, but probably not them either. Not that the business of regulating bars and package stores is without controversy elsewhere in the state.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | February 1, 2013
Sundays in Baltimore County, even Super Bowl Sundays, are not what they could be, says business owner David Trone, operator of Beltway Fine Wine & Spirits in Towson. Trone is hoping the hoopla over the Ravens vs. 49ers will help consumers focus on what he sees as outdated liquor laws that keep most beer and wine shops in the county closed on Sundays. This Sunday, he says, Baltimore County residents who failed to plan ahead for Super Bowl parties could find themselves having to cross county lines to stock up on beer and wine.
EXPLORE
August 10, 2012
The decision regarding the liquor license at the Wegmans store by the Howard County Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board is absurd and infuriating ("No license for liquor store at Wegmans," Aug. 2.) The only purpose Maryland's liquor laws serve is protectionism. and this decision certainly smacks of protectionism. The board's reasons for rejection are spurious: • "Not necessary for the accommodation of the public…" I would find the ability to purchased alcoholic beverages while parked at Wegmans very convenient.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
If you would like to open a bar or restaurant that sells alcoholic beverages on the Liberty Road corridor in Baltimore County, a liquor license will run you $2,000. About a 20-minute drive away, Joe's Crab Shack, a chain restaurant that's moving into the Hunt Valley Towne Centre, just paid $225,000 for its liquor license. The reason? An antiquated system that allots licenses by population in districts drawn decades ago and allows those licenses to be bought and sold on the open market.
EXPLORE
January 18, 2012
It seems in Maryland politics, there are occasional issues that linger beyond their usefulness. Back when I was a kid, well into my teens and possibly even later than that, Maryland was the only state that didn't require dump trucks to cover their loads. It's a basic safety issue. When a truck hauling loose materials like gravel, or sand or salt or whatever is cruising along a roadway at 35 to 55 mph, there's a possibility of spillage. This can be substantially reduced by covering a dump truck full of whatever with a heavy tarp.
NEWS
October 30, 1995
AT LEAST this year the Carroll County commissioners and the county's State House delegation were able to sit down in a timely fashion to discuss proposed changes in the county's liquor laws. Last year, the meeting took place too late for the General Assembly session. But judging from the comments of some legislators, don't expect much improvement in some of Carroll's more nonsensical liquor regulations.Given the problems liquor can cause, there undoubtedly should be regulation and strong oversight of alcohol sales.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2003
An organization promoting sadism, masochism and other sexual fetishes has canceled plans for a three-day convention in Ocean City, bowing to church, community and business groups worried about the resort's family image. Members of Black Rose decided to scrap the Nov. 14-16 convention at the Princess Royale hotel when they learned their activities might violate local liquor laws, city officials said. The group had planned, among other events, demonstrations of safe bondage techniques. City Solicitor Guy R. Ayres III noted that nudity, whipping and other activity associated with S&M are not legal in establishments with liquor licenses in Ocean City.
NEWS
November 6, 2011
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz recognized the insanity of Baltimore County liquor laws when talking to an acquaintance in Ocean City . The man owned a restaurant and nightclub that had gone out of business, and he was musing about what assets could be salvaged - chairs that could be sold, or windows that could be used somewhere else - when Mr. Kamenetz asked him what he planned to do with his liquor license. Much to Mr. Kamenetz's surprise, the main looked at him in confusion and said he'd hand it back in to the county.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2011
The latest round of fines levied by the Harford County Liquor Control Board in cases in which alcohol was served to people too young in the eyes of the law to drink indicates there's still a bit too much leniency in such cases. In the recent spate of cases to come before the board for hearings, fines for the culpable were in the $500 to $2,000 range, which, though not insubstantial, are certainly not economically debilitating to a business licensed to sell alcohol. As usual, there is some wiggle room for the folks found to be in violation.
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