Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLiquor Inspector
IN THE NEWS

Liquor Inspector

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
Good Guys Bar and Grill, a North Laurel establishment that has been criticized for its scantily clad female dancers, is now a target of the county liquor inspector.Michael J. Sherman, the inspector, filed a petition yesterday claiming that performers at the bar and grill have danced obscenely, violating county law. The petition seeks to have the bar owners fined, or their liquor license suspended or revoked.Mr. Sherman said the dancers exposed their buttocks and other body parts and danced obscenely during four inspections of the bar in October and November.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 22, 2014
It's a safe estimate that there are as many people turning 21 in Harford County each year as there are county residents graduating from high school. Give or take a few, this amounts to 3,200 people a year, or about 62 a week. It's hardly an overwhelming number for an operation that handles the volume of people that regularly pass through the doors of Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration office in Bel Air. It seems like a bit much, then, for the MVA to have instituted a practice of obliging anyone younger than 40 to make use of automated kiosks or Internet-based services when doing things like requesting new drivers licenses.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1995
When Gov. Parris N. Glendening vetoed a bill this week that banned large new bars in Southeast Baltimore, he also killed the bill's main provision, which prohibited liquor inspectors from soliciting campaign contributions from bar owners.The solicitation ban grew from a recommendation of a task force appointed by state Sen. John A. Pica Jr., a Baltimore Democrat, after a story in The Sun on conflicts of interest of liquor board employees.In the last minutes of the General Assembly last month, another Democratic senator from the city, Perry Sfikas, amended the bill to ban so-called megabars from obtaining liquor licenses in an area stretching from Little Italy to Canton, where residents have complained of drunken rowdiness.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
Black scuff marks line the staircase at 922 N. Charles St., left there by frustrated tenants kicking the wall in a vain attempt to make their neighbor, the Museum Restaurant and Lounge, quiet down. Most nights, tenants say, the sound of DJs hyping up the crowd rattles china cabinets and nerves alike. "It's thump, thump, thump from the music," said Will Penn, 48, who lives in one of the apartments next door. Penn, like many other Baltimoreans who live near bars, said he has filed complaints using the city's 311 system but has seen nothing change.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and JoAnna Daemmrich and Kate Shatzkin and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
State Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli is investigating a fired city liquor inspector's claims about the relationship between a state senator and a convicted felon seeking a liquor license for a lavish nightclub in downtown Baltimore last year.The investigation involves questions about the role state Sen. Larry Young played in the controversial license application. At the same time, the fired inspector is challenging the city's time-honored patronage system in court.Edward Smith Jr., a lawyer who represents the former inspector, Marion P. Turner, said yesterday he received a call from an investigator for the state prosecutor early this month, asking to speak with Turner about a court affidavit in which she made the claims.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2000
A former city liquor inspector, whose accusations of corruption on the liquor board fueled a criminal probe, has filed suit in U.S. District Court charging that her May 24, 1996, firing was racially motivated. In the four-page complaint filed Wednesday, Marion P. Turner, the former liquor inspector charged that while she was fired after being accused of violating board policies, a white employee who acknowledged similar violations was neither disciplined or discharged. Nathan C. Irby Jr., executive secretary of the board, said yesterday that he had just received a copy of the suit and had not had a chance to review it. Turner previously filed a wrongful termination suit in Baltimore City Circuit Court, but the case was dismissed.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
For a guy who says he doesn't play politics, Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden, a Republican, has made a very unusual move.He fired a veteran county liquor inspector who is campaign coordinator for Council Chairman Charles A. Dutch Ruppersberger, a Democrat and potential challenger in next year's elections.The replacement is a close political ally of Essex Delegate E. Farrell Maddox, another Democrat whose supporters' votes may crucial in the 1994 contest.Robert Barrett, a part-time liquor inspector since 1987, learned of his firing Friday.
NEWS
February 8, 2009
Long before they met, Martin Johnson and Jason Hall crossed paths professionally. Johnson's first week as Howard County's liquor inspector was Hall's first week as a police cadet. That was nearly 13 years ago. At the end of this month, long after they worked together for the first time, Hall is scheduled to succeed Johnson, who is retiring from Howard County Police Department after a 25-year career. Johnson, 48, will become an instructor for the Academy of Counterterrorist Education, a division of the Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
Marion P. Turner, the whistle-blower whose allegations of wrongdoing lead to indictments at the Baltimore liquor board, has lost a court appeal in her long battle to win back her post as a liquor inspector.In a 19-page opinion issued this week, the state Court of Special Appeals concluded that Turner had failed to prove that she lost her job on May 24, 1996, because she refused to break the law in a case involving ousted state Sen. Larry Young. The court also said Turner had forfeited her appeal rights because she did not first file a notice of her intent to sue with the state treasurer.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
Thousands of dollars in cash payoffs were collected every week from bar owners, brought back to a Waverly bar and stashed in a back-room kitchen, the prosecution's chief witness in a city liquor board corruption case testified yesterday. Donald Harlow, a former liquor inspector testifying under immunity, told city Circuit Court jurors that he collected up to $2,000 a week from the owner of the Aegean Restaurant on Eastern Avenue. In return the bar, like several others, was protected from enforcement of liquor laws, including a ban on after-hours operations, he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
The owners of an Ellicott City convenience store were fined $250 Wednesday for selling beer to an underage police agent who showed his actual driver's license to the clerk. Sanjay Kumar Sureshchandra Choksai and Rakesh Kumar Chandrandan Shah did not contest charges brought by Howard County police Detective Mark Baxter, the county's liquor inspector. In a statement of facts, they acknowledged that on March 12 at 2 p.m., a clerk sold a six-pack of beer to a 20-year-old man sent into the store by Baxter, even though the clerk examined his driver's license showing his true age. The store is in the 9000 block of Frederick Road.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
A recent city audit of the Baltimore liquor board found that the panel did not maintain accurate payroll attendance records, including several instances where full-time inspectors had signed in to work but failed to log out, according to the 15-page report. The report also found that liquor employees were not logging accurate days and hours while working the late-night 311 complaint response phone lines. The audit covered fiscal years June 2005 to June 2007, a period primarily under the jurisdiction of the previous three-person liquor board.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
A recent city audit of the Baltimore liquor board found that the panel did not maintain accurate payroll attendance records, including several instances where full-time inspectors had signed in to work but failed to log out, according to the 15-page report. The report also found that liquor employees were not logging accurate days and hours while working the late-night 311 complaint response phone lines. The audit covered fiscal years June 2005 to June 2007, a period primarily under the jurisdiction of the previous three-person liquor board.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | October 12, 2009
When Baltimore's liquor board commissioners were sworn into office in April 2007, they took over an agency reeling from threats, lawsuits and internal backbiting. Charged by Gov. Martin O'Malley with restoring public trust, the three-member panel has virtually cut out the infighting. But some observers argue that the commissioners have also taken a heavy-handed approach to their oversight responsibilities, dishing out substantial fines and suspensions and revoking more licenses than is necessary.
NEWS
February 8, 2009
Long before they met, Martin Johnson and Jason Hall crossed paths professionally. Johnson's first week as Howard County's liquor inspector was Hall's first week as a police cadet. That was nearly 13 years ago. At the end of this month, long after they worked together for the first time, Hall is scheduled to succeed Johnson, who is retiring from Howard County Police Department after a 25-year career. Johnson, 48, will become an instructor for the Academy of Counterterrorist Education, a division of the Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Reporter | March 22, 2007
The longtime chief inspector of the Baltimore County liquor board denied yesterday that former Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr. had unusual influence over the board as he boasted to an undercover federal agent in a series of wiretaps released this week. Bromwell, under indictment for corruption charges, was recorded in 2001 assuring the agent that his connections could secure permission for an off-track betting facility in Baltimore County. Bromwell said he could get the state's major thoroughbred racetracks to go along, as well as the county's liquor board.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
Chief liquor board inspector Anthony J. Cianferano was suspended without pay yesterday, a day after he was indicted on bribery charges, but a city liquor inspector who was also indicted remains on the public payroll.The Board of Liquor License Commissioners said Cianferano, an employee since 1977, could return to his $30,632-a-year post if he is found not guilty of conspiring to block enforcement of liquor laws by paying bribes."The severity of the punishment is why we felt he should be suspended without pay," said board Chairman Leonard R. Skolnik.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Staff writer | October 30, 1991
A North Laurel bar and grill where scantily clad women prance to rock and roll music and whirl suggestively around brass poles has prompted a Howard County delegate to introduce a bill to ban "obscene" liveperformances.Delegate John S. Morgan, R-13B, said he pre-filed the bill after complaints from several constituents about performancesat Good Guys Bar and Grill on U.S. 1. The bill would make Howard County the fourth jurisdiction covered by a state obscenity law that nowapplies to Anne Arundel, Wicomico and Worcester counties.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | February 3, 2007
Baltimore liquor board chairman Mark S. Fosler has resigned as head of the state agency and appears to be eyeing a subordinate position as liquor inspector, according to agency officials and sources familiar with the hiring process. At liquor board hearings at City Hall Thursday, commissioner Edward Smith Jr. took over in Fosler's absence. Smith confirmed Fosler's departure but did not elaborate. Fosler recently took the civil service exam to become a liquor inspector and a short time later quit his post as liquor board chairman, said Samuel T. Daniels, the agency's executive secretary.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | October 18, 2006
Baltimore's newest strip club, Scores, is poised to expand but without the striptease acts that its owner says draw pro athletes and diplomats alike. Scores owner Brian Shulman won approval from the zoning appeals board recently to open a second-floor lounge at his Fallsway club but with the caveat that there would be no adult entertainment there. The approval has city and liquor board officials wondering, however, what the prohibition means. They say there's no way they can stop entertainers from hanging out in the upstairs lounge as long as the women are dressed and not performing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.