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Liquid Nitrogen

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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 14, 2003
Howard County police closed the southbound lane of Snowden River Parkway for almost six hours yesterday after a tanker truck overturned, spilling about 7,000 gallons of liquid nitrogen. The truck was carrying the refrigeration liquid when it overturned about 9 a.m. near Route 175, rupturing the tank, said Howard County fire department spokesman William Mould. Mould said the driver might have turned too quickly and caused his load to shift. The driver, who was not identified, suffered minor injuries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 28, 2012
As a dairy farmer, I am getting the bare minimum - a price set by the federal government - for my milk while continuing to pay top dollar for feed and fuel. I am so tired of reading about farmers polluting the Chesapeake Bay. I don't know a single dairy farmer who can afford to dump chemicals in the bay. Most of the dairy farmers have been forced out of business in Maryland. Why is it OK for these sewage treatment plants to repeatedly dump in the bay and no one says a word? They have mechanical or electrical failures over and over and nothing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | August 23, 2007
Call it better drinking through chemistry. Last Saturday night at Ixia, molecular mixologist Tom Cusack chilled mojitos and beer with liquid nitrogen. Fog streamed down glasses and bottles onto the bar, and patrons slurped shots without glasses. Baltimore isn't known for setting nightlife trends. But with Cusack behind the bar, that might change. The 23-year-old Cusack (not related to the actors, by the way) works in neurobiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital during the day and tends bar at Ixia Friday and Saturday nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
To promote nightlife in swanky Harbor East, Cross Street Partners is organizing what it bills as the neighborhood's " first pub crawl , a progressive event perfect for foodies and fun-loving city dwellers. " "People come here and they eat in the dining rooms but a lot of times they don't go to the bars," said Jo Ann Stallings, marketing director at Cross Street. "This is a way to introduce people to the bars. " As always, Cross Street, the company made up of the fallen pieces of Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse , has its finger on the pulse of things.  No neighborhood in Baltimore screams pub crawl quite like Harbor East.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
It was November 2006, and Tim Askew had his hands full just dealing with the idea that his new company's technology could treat esophageal cancer. He hadn't even launched his first product, he had few employees, and revenue was still months away. But then he got a call from Dr. William Krimsky, and his world got a lot more complicated "He single-handedly changed the course of the company," said Askew, who is chief executive of CSA Medical Inc.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Doctors treated four benign lesions on President Bush's face last week, the White House said yesterday. Aides said the small growths were no threat to the president's health. The lesions were treated with liquid nitrogen Friday afternoon, and the growths are expected to dry up and fall off within days. Two of the lesions, known as actinic keratoses, while not cancerous, can progress into a form of skin cancer if untreated. They are caused by sun exposure. The two other lesions, known as seborrheic keratoses, are not related to sun exposure and are not considered a cancer risk.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
QUEENSTOWN - One man was killed and another was critically injured in an early-morning accident that sent a dense cloud of nitrogen vapor spewing from an overturned tanker truck and forced the closure of a 4-mile stretch of U.S. 50 for nearly 10 hours yesterday. State police and a hazardous materials response team from the Maryland Department of the Environment diverted traffic as 6,000 gallons of liquid nitrogen leaked from the tanker near the Chesapeake Outlet Center. Killed in the 5:50 a.m. crash was Archie Riley, 75, of Stevensville, the driver of a 1989 Chevrolet Beretta that collided with the tanker truck driven by Anthony I. Conway, 45, of Baltimore.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
As a dairy farmer, I am getting the bare minimum - a price set by the federal government - for my milk while continuing to pay top dollar for feed and fuel. I am so tired of reading about farmers polluting the Chesapeake Bay. I don't know a single dairy farmer who can afford to dump chemicals in the bay. Most of the dairy farmers have been forced out of business in Maryland. Why is it OK for these sewage treatment plants to repeatedly dump in the bay and no one says a word? They have mechanical or electrical failures over and over and nothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
To promote nightlife in swanky Harbor East, Cross Street Partners is organizing what it bills as the neighborhood's " first pub crawl , a progressive event perfect for foodies and fun-loving city dwellers. " "People come here and they eat in the dining rooms but a lot of times they don't go to the bars," said Jo Ann Stallings, marketing director at Cross Street. "This is a way to introduce people to the bars. " As always, Cross Street, the company made up of the fallen pieces of Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse , has its finger on the pulse of things.  No neighborhood in Baltimore screams pub crawl quite like Harbor East.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | January 6, 2008
Dropping a chunk of dry ice into an empty orange balloon, Nate Widom predicted that it would explode. "No, wait," the 10-year-old said yesterday. "It will blow itself up." After the mouth of the balloon was knotted off, it did just that. "As the solid heats up, it sublimates and inflates the balloon," explained Joyce A. Trageser, the supervisor of school programs at the Maryland Science Center and the instructor for its first Saturday Morning Science workshop of the year. "Think of it - it's a solid changing to a gas without becoming a liquid.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
It was November 2006, and Tim Askew had his hands full just dealing with the idea that his new company's technology could treat esophageal cancer. He hadn't even launched his first product, he had few employees, and revenue was still months away. But then he got a call from Dr. William Krimsky, and his world got a lot more complicated "He single-handedly changed the course of the company," said Askew, who is chief executive of CSA Medical Inc.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | January 6, 2008
Dropping a chunk of dry ice into an empty orange balloon, Nate Widom predicted that it would explode. "No, wait," the 10-year-old said yesterday. "It will blow itself up." After the mouth of the balloon was knotted off, it did just that. "As the solid heats up, it sublimates and inflates the balloon," explained Joyce A. Trageser, the supervisor of school programs at the Maryland Science Center and the instructor for its first Saturday Morning Science workshop of the year. "Think of it - it's a solid changing to a gas without becoming a liquid.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | August 23, 2007
Call it better drinking through chemistry. Last Saturday night at Ixia, molecular mixologist Tom Cusack chilled mojitos and beer with liquid nitrogen. Fog streamed down glasses and bottles onto the bar, and patrons slurped shots without glasses. Baltimore isn't known for setting nightlife trends. But with Cusack behind the bar, that might change. The 23-year-old Cusack (not related to the actors, by the way) works in neurobiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital during the day and tends bar at Ixia Friday and Saturday nights.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 14, 2003
Howard County police closed the southbound lane of Snowden River Parkway for almost six hours yesterday after a tanker truck overturned, spilling about 7,000 gallons of liquid nitrogen. The truck was carrying the refrigeration liquid when it overturned about 9 a.m. near Route 175, rupturing the tank, said Howard County fire department spokesman William Mould. Mould said the driver might have turned too quickly and caused his load to shift. The driver, who was not identified, suffered minor injuries.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 11, 2003
TODAY'S COLUMN is about ideas. Let's start with the one that came from McDonald's - selling its own, fast-food crab cake at outlets on the Eastern Shore. Here's what reader David Reich of Perry Hall thinks about that: "Marylanders need crab cakes at McDonald's like Little Italy needs an Olive Garden." And speaking of things we really could do without - a new townhouse development in Harford County, the expansion of Arundel Mills mall, another Starbucks in Towson - how about watering the lawn?
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Doctors treated four benign lesions on President Bush's face last week, the White House said yesterday. Aides said the small growths were no threat to the president's health. The lesions were treated with liquid nitrogen Friday afternoon, and the growths are expected to dry up and fall off within days. Two of the lesions, known as actinic keratoses, while not cancerous, can progress into a form of skin cancer if untreated. They are caused by sun exposure. The two other lesions, known as seborrheic keratoses, are not related to sun exposure and are not considered a cancer risk.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
This is supposed to be the year Orioles pitcher Mike Mussina wins his first Cy Young Award. Instead, he has been touched by the Fickle Finger of Fate, which could earn him a trip to the disabled list.A wart in the middle of the tip of Mussina's right index finger has become so problematic that club officials are prepared to lose their ace for at least two starts. It cracked open during the first inning of yesterday's 8-2 loss to the Chicago White Sox, and Mussina was removed after the fifth in his shortest outing of the season.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 11, 2003
TODAY'S COLUMN is about ideas. Let's start with the one that came from McDonald's - selling its own, fast-food crab cake at outlets on the Eastern Shore. Here's what reader David Reich of Perry Hall thinks about that: "Marylanders need crab cakes at McDonald's like Little Italy needs an Olive Garden." And speaking of things we really could do without - a new townhouse development in Harford County, the expansion of Arundel Mills mall, another Starbucks in Towson - how about watering the lawn?
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
QUEENSTOWN - One man was killed and another was critically injured in an early-morning accident that sent a dense cloud of nitrogen vapor spewing from an overturned tanker truck and forced the closure of a 4-mile stretch of U.S. 50 for nearly 10 hours yesterday. State police and a hazardous materials response team from the Maryland Department of the Environment diverted traffic as 6,000 gallons of liquid nitrogen leaked from the tanker near the Chesapeake Outlet Center. Killed in the 5:50 a.m. crash was Archie Riley, 75, of Stevensville, the driver of a 1989 Chevrolet Beretta that collided with the tanker truck driven by Anthony I. Conway, 45, of Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
This is supposed to be the year Orioles pitcher Mike Mussina wins his first Cy Young Award. Instead, he has been touched by the Fickle Finger of Fate, which could earn him a trip to the disabled list.A wart in the middle of the tip of Mussina's right index finger has become so problematic that club officials are prepared to lose their ace for at least two starts. It cracked open during the first inning of yesterday's 8-2 loss to the Chicago White Sox, and Mussina was removed after the fifth in his shortest outing of the season.
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