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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
A Calvert County judge brushed aside Friday a potential legal hurdle to exporting liquefied natural gas via the Chesapeake Bay, ruling that Dominion, the Richmond, Va.-based energy company, does not need the Sierra Club's permission to convert its LNG import terminal at Cove Point. Circuit Judge James P. Salmon said Dominion has the right to export LNG from Cove Point, despite an agreement the company has had for decades giving the Sierra Club and another environmental group a say over the company's expansion of the little-used shipping facility near the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in Southern Maryland.
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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
An estimated 500 people rallied Thursday in Baltimore against plans to export liquefied natural gas from a Southern Maryland facility, chanting and carrying signs past the office tower where state regulators were considering one aspect of that proposal. The authority to approve or reject the project lies with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. But Maryland's Public Service Commission has the say over a 130-megawatt power plant that energy company Dominion says it needs for the export operation.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
The way energy company Dominion sees it, exporting liquefied natural gas from its Southern Maryland complex wouldn't be that big of a shift from the importing it does now. Same pipes, same storage tanks, same terminal. But the project at Cove Point strikes opponents as a sea change. Now those fighting the proposal on environmental grounds are joining forces with some Calvert County residents worried about hazards from the liquefied natural gas, or LNG, which on rare occasions has caused deadly fires or explosions.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
The way energy company Dominion sees it, exporting liquefied natural gas from its Southern Maryland complex wouldn't be that big of a shift from the importing it does now. Same pipes, same storage tanks, same terminal. But the project at Cove Point strikes opponents as a sea change. Now those fighting the proposal on environmental grounds are joining forces with some Calvert County residents worried about hazards from the liquefied natural gas, or LNG, which on rare occasions has caused deadly fires or explosions.
NEWS
November 8, 2006
An article in Thursday's Maryland section about a proposed liquefied natural gas facility might have left the impression that state environmental officials had tested sediment in the precise location where the company that wants to build the terminal would dredge. The Maryland Department of the Environment has tested the general area.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2004
With demand and prices for natural gas escalating sharply, the operator of the Cove Point liquefied natural gas terminal in Calvert County said yesterday that it plans to nearly double output capacity by 2008. Energy company Dominion Resources Inc. said it wants to increase the daily output of its terminal from 1 billion cubic feet per day - enough to serve the energy needs of 3.4 million homes - to 1.8 billion cubic feet per day, enough for 6.2 million homes. Dominion is proposing to double its storage tank capacity, expand its Maryland pipeline and build a new pipeline in central Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2001
Citing national security concerns, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said it will reconsider the approval it gave a month ago to plans to reactivate the Cove Point liquefied natural gas terminal in Lusby. Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the terminal's proximity to the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant - which is about three miles north on the Chesapeake Bay in Calvert County - has fueled concern that without proper safeguards its reactivation could pose risks of terrorist acts.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2000
A $400-million Calvert County terminal once expected to be a major supplier of natural gas but which has been used only for storage by companies needing a little extra fuel on cold-weather days, may get a second life. Cove Point was built in 1978 but became idle two years later because of rising prices to ship liquefied natural gas from overseas. The liquid form takes up approximately 600 times less space. It became a storage facility about five years ago. A move to return the terminal to use means that the Williams Cos., which recently bought Cove Point, would be able to provide customers such as Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. with a steady supply of liquid natural gas right from Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
In light of terrorist risks since Sept. 11, U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski called yesterday for a complete re-evaluation of plans to reactivate the Cove Point liquefied natural gas terminal in Lusby, which sits within 3 1/2 miles of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant. "There's renewed concern that terrorists will attack ships carrying fuels, posing a real risk," the Maryland senator said in a statement to the Senate yesterday. On Oct. 11, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission gave preliminary approval - with some conditions - to the Williams Cos. Inc.'s $150 million plan to bring parts of the facility back on line and add a fifth storage tank.
NEWS
February 22, 2007
Judge bars enforcement of LNG facilities limits A federal judge yesterday ordered Baltimore County government not to enforce the newest restrictions on liquefied natural gas facilities until a hearing can be scheduled. Lawyers for AES Corp., the global power supply company that wants to build a LNG facility on Sparrows Point, filed a lawsuit against Baltimore County officials Feb. 6, a day after the County Council passed a law banning liquefied natural gas facilities in coastal areas.
NEWS
By Diane Leopold | December 4, 2013
The liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility at the Dominion Cove Point Terminal has long been a model of industrial and environmental cooperation. More than 1,000 acres of pristine beach, forest and marsh lands in southern Maryland are conserved, while at the same time the Chesapeake Bay is unharmed. Dominion is proud of its award-winning role as an environmental steward at Cove Point and has designed its proposed LNG export project to continue that commitment. The Baltimore Sun's Sunday editorial calling for greater scrutiny of the project fails to take these facts and many more into account.
NEWS
December 2, 2013
There is nothing small or inconsequential about plans to build a liquefied natural gas export terminal at Cove Point in Southern Maryland's Calvert County. Dominion Resources wants to invest in the neighborhood of $3.8 billion to build the controversial facility, and officials claim its three-year construction will create jobs for as many as 3,000 people. By any standard, that's a huge private investment in Maryland, and small wonder it's already gotten support from the county's elected officials, from Maryland's construction trade unions and from Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, one of this state's most powerful political figures.
NEWS
November 21, 2013
In a recent opinion piece, Chesapeake Climate Action Network's James McGarry grossly mischaracterized recent studies on liquefied natural gas exports ( "Exporting natural gas is a bad deal for Maryland," Nov. 12). In reality, countless studies support LNG exports. In particular, a U.S. Department of Energy study, compiled by NERA Consulting, found that LNG exports will result in "net benefits to the U.S. economy" and that "consumers, in aggregate, are better off as a result of LNG exports.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
A Calvert County judge brushed aside Friday a potential legal hurdle to exporting liquefied natural gas via the Chesapeake Bay, ruling that Dominion, the Richmond, Va.-based energy company, does not need the Sierra Club's permission to convert its LNG import terminal at Cove Point. Circuit Judge James P. Salmon said Dominion has the right to export LNG from Cove Point, despite an agreement the company has had for decades giving the Sierra Club and another environmental group a say over the company's expansion of the little-used shipping facility near the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in Southern Maryland.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
Opponents of a liquefied natural gas terminal in eastern Baltimore County stepped up their attacks Tuesday, hosting an appearance by a former CIA officer who said the $400 million project lacks critical safeguards and raises the specter of terrorism and piracy. "The more I looked into this project, the more I thought the company building it does not care about the safety implications," said Charles S. Faddis, who retired a year ago as chief of the Central Intelligence Agency's anti-terrorism unit and is a security consultant, based in Davidsonville, and a writer who has published two books on security issues.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | December 6, 2008
Federal officials have determined that a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal at Sparrows Point in eastern Baltimore County would have "mostly limited adverse environmental impact" if constructed and operated with certain measures in place, according to a report released yesterday. The final environmental impact statement, by the staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, comes months after a preliminary report, which recommended conditional approval for the project proposed by the Virginia-based AES Corp.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2006
Dundalk-area residents - less than pleased by a global power company's plan to build a liquefied natural gas plant at Sparrows Point - were openly hostile last night during an "open house" meeting with company officials. "This thing is more dangerous than you all are painting," Dundalk resident Jerome Hancock said of the terminal proposed for a former shipyard site. "If something negative happens, who will be responsible?" said Jennifer Canter, an Edgemere resident. According to AES, the Arlington, Va., company, shipments of the super-chilled liquefied gas would arrive by tanker two to three times a week.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | February 6, 2007
A plan for Baltimore County to buy parkland next to a high school on the east side won approval of the County Council last night. The measure, approved unanimously, authorizes the county administration to pay $900,000 to a developer for about 20 acres near Sparrows Point High School in Edgemere. County officials say the property, some of which is wetlands, would be used for parks and recreation, perhaps by a high school science magnet program. "At a time when we're losing precious green space, I think this is an opportunity where we can acquire green space and parkland near the water," said Councilman John A. Olszewski Sr., a Dundalk Democrat whose district includes the land.
NEWS
April 18, 2008
Meeting about LNG terminal is planned Richard Muth, director of the county's Office of Homeland Security, is scheduled to speak at a community meeting Tuesday about safety and security issues associated with the proposed liquefied natural gas terminal on Sparrows Point. Muth will discuss the findings of the U.S. Coast Guard's recent report on the project proposed by AES Corp., which wants to build the LNG terminal at the former Bethlehem Steel shipyard to receive large tankers carrying liquefied natural gas. The 7 p.m. meeting will be in the auditorium of Dundalk Middle School, 7400 Dunmanway.
NEWS
May 8, 2007
A safe, remote site for new LNG plant The editorial "Too close for comfort" (May 1) on the proposed AES Corp. Sparrows Point liquefied natural gas facility focuses on its distance from populated areas and from those involved in the decision-making process on the proposal's fate. The siting of an infrastructure project is always a difficult process. Sometimes the complaints about the location are based on good reasons; sometimes they are based on misinformation. In the case of the LNG facility, many of the critics of the project have bought into misinformation aboutit.
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