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NEWS
January 6, 2005
On January 3, 2005 WORTHINGTON LIPSCOMB; husband of Ethel Lipscomb. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 East North Avenue, on Friday after 8 A.M. The family will receive friends at Nazarene Temple, 2312 Harford Road, on Saturday at 10 A.M. Services will follow at 10:30 A.M. See www.marchfh.com LURZ, beloved mother of Andrew M. Stout, loving daughter of Loretta A. Lurz and the late Joseph F. Lurz. Loving sister of Sandra K. Lurz, Beth Smith, J. Michael Lurz, Joanne Sellers, James F. Lurz, Jeffrey P. Lurz, J. Robert Lurz, J. Timothy Lurz, Patricia M. Carberry, Joel P. Lurz and J. Martin Lurz and the late J. Dennis Lurz.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
All JJ Butler   had to do to earn a Division I basketball scholarship was run the point for an AAU team he had never played for during a major East Coast tournament with the coach of the school he loved looking on from the stands. Many players in Butler's shoes might have panicked over that type of pressure. But the Patterson Mill senior suited up for Maryland 3D in all three of its games at the Baltimore Big Shots event last weekend, and evidently did more than enough to impress Scott Sanderson . On Monday night, the Lipscomb coach called to offer Butler a scholarship, which the 6-foot-2, 180-pound point guard immediately accepted.
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SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
All JJ Butler   had to do to earn a Division I basketball scholarship was run the point for an AAU team he had never played for during a major East Coast tournament with the coach of the school he loved looking on from the stands. Many players in Butler's shoes might have panicked over that type of pressure. But the Patterson Mill senior suited up for Maryland 3D in all three of its games at the Baltimore Big Shots event last weekend, and evidently did more than enough to impress Scott Sanderson . On Monday night, the Lipscomb coach called to offer Butler a scholarship, which the 6-foot-2, 180-pound point guard immediately accepted.
EXPLORE
January 25, 2012
Marc and Linda Lipscomb, of Bel Air, announce the marriage of their daughter, Christina Lipscomb, to Christopher Abrams, son of Walter and Kerry Abrams, of Port Deposit, on Sept. 10, 2011 at St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Bel Air. The Maid of honor was the bride's best friend, Michele Limmer. The bridesmaids were Caitlin Lipscomb, sister of the bride, Mandy Jones, cousin of the bride, Jasmine Thomas and Becky Schwartz, friends of the bride. The flower girls were Alexis Abrams, daughter of the couple and Mia Abrams, niece of the groom.
NEWS
March 12, 2009
On March 6, 2009, GERALDINE C. LIPSCOMB. Services are private. Arrangements by CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME. All inquiries can be directed to the funeral home at 410-578-3822.
NEWS
May 7, 2004
On May 5, 2004, ROBERT E. "BOB", beloved husband of Carole A. Lipscomb, loving father of Andrew E. Calder Jr., William S. Calder, Robert T. Lipscomb, Jerry R. Calder, Deborah M. Lipscomb, Steven Lipscomb, Cathleen A. Moylan, and Sean P. Lipscomb. Loving grandfather of 12. Friends may call at THE JOHNSON FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 8521 Loch Raven Blvd. (beltway exit 29-B) on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. where family and friends are invited to attend services on Saturday at 10 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | January 8, 2009
Ronald H. Lipscomb loved being part of the development team behind the high-end Four Seasons hotel and condominium tower now rising on Baltimore's transformed Harbor East waterfront. Years before the first shovel of dirt, he mused about buying a seven-figure penthouse there - a move that, like his role in the project itself, would drive home his arrival as an elite developer. Now, the Four Seasons is at the heart of a one-count bribery indictment against Lipscomb, who has intertwined hard work and political ties to move well beyond humble roots as a dirt hauler.
NEWS
May 7, 2004
Robert E. Lipscomb, a retired millwright who was a guiding force behind Chip House, a halfway house for recovering alcoholics in Charles Village, died Wednesday of a heart condition at his home in Parkville. He was 73. Mr. Lipscomb was born and raised in Baltimore, joined the merchant marine when he was 16 and served in the Air Force during the Korean War. For many years, he operated his business servicing and repairing large conveyer belts at power plants and manufacturing operations, including Bethlehem Steel Corp.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | June 21, 2009
For months, I've rifled through the day's mail, looking hopefully for something most people dread: a summons to jury duty. Yes, I am that strange person who longs to be a juror. Called upon to be judgmental rather than criticized for it? A columnist's idea of heaven. But receiving no invitation to jump into the current pool, State of Maryland v. Ronald H. Lipscomb will go to trial Monday without me in the jury box. I'm particularly chagrined now that I've gotten a look at what Lipscomb's defense attorneys want to ask potential jurors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2011
It's nice to know Sheila Dixon and the city of Baltimore weren't alone in showering favors on developer Ron Lipscomb. In a foreclosure sale just completed in May, Lipscomb lost a 4,000-square-foot Canton warehouse he'd hoped to redevelop. Real estate records for the property, at 2114 Cambridge St., indicate that Lipscomb's Doracon Contracting bought it in September 2005 for $640,000.  Three months later, Doracon sold the warehouse in what's described as an arms-length sale to Lipscomb for a low, low $144,633.
NEWS
By Joseph Burris and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 9, 2010
Two days after pleading guilty to perjury and announcing she would resign from office, Mayor Sheila Dixon on Friday lashed out at the former boyfriend and developer whose lavish gifts to her contributed to her downfall. But, a legal expert warns that she is risking a plea agreement she entered into by venting. Speaking to the Associated Press, Dixon refused to admit wrongdoing despite tendering her resignation Wednesday, effective Feb. 4, as part of a plea deal in her criminal trial.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 6, 2010
On the eve of a court hearing that might represent her best chance of remaining in office, a reflective Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon said the prospect of stepping down is "not the best feeling" and that she regrets an affair with a developer that she believes led to her legal troubles. Dixon gave a lengthy, if impromptu, interview Monday evening to The Baltimore Sun, making her first extended public remarks about her trial since a jury convicted her last month of embezzling gift cards intended for the needy.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella , jean.marbella@baltsun.com | December 2, 2009
Did it happen as early as jury selection, or as late as the closing arguments? Or was it at some point in between when the trial of Mayor Sheila Dixon started heading down a path that led jurors to find her guilty Tuesday on one of five criminal counts? In a trial that took surprising turns over its 14-day course, no one incident alone propelled the action; rather it was a pileup of factors that eventually resulted in her conviction on a charge of misappropriation. Going into trial, conventional wisdom seemed to favor Dixon - her seven-member legal team would seem to outgun State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh and his three lawyers in sheer numbers alone, if not reputation.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | jean.marbella@baltsun.com | December 2, 2009
Did it happen as early as jury selection, or as late as the closing arguments? Or was it at some point in between when the trial of Mayor Sheila Dixon started heading down a path that led jurors to find her guilty Tuesday on one of five criminal counts? In a trial that took surprising turns over its 14-day course, no one incident alone propelled the action; rather it was a pileup of factors that eventually resulted in her conviction on a charge of misappropriation. Going into trial, conventional wisdom seemed to favor Dixon - her seven-member legal team would seem to outgun State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh and his three lawyers in sheer numbers alone, if not reputation.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 18, 2009
Like the Cheshire Cat, the case against Mayor Sheila Dixon might be fading to the point where there could be nothing left but a grin. I don't know whom that grin will belong to when the trial is done, but I bet I know who is smiling for now. Exhibit A: Ronald Lipscomb, the developer whose gifts to the mayor figure into both the current and subsequent criminal cases against her. Dixon's one-time boyfriend, he entered into a plea agreement in...
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Annie Linskey and Julie Bykowicz and Annie Linskey,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com and Annie.Linskey@baltsun.com | November 18, 2009
Prosecutors rested their case Tuesday against Mayor Sheila Dixon without calling Ronald H. Lipscomb, thought to be their key witness - a decision that prompted the judge to dismiss two theft charges connected to gifts from the developer. The trial appeared to be winding down, and Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney assured jurors that it was moving quickly. The judge took the prosecutors and defense attorneys into chambers late Tuesday to discuss what jurors should be told before they begin deliberations.
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