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NEWS
December 6, 1991
For the first time in Maryland's summer-fall budget crisis, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has uttered the dreaded "T" (for Tax) word. "It's now time to face realism," he said yesterday after receiving more gloomy news on sagging state revenues. He is staring at an 18-month deficit that exceeds one and a quarter billion dollars.Such an enormous gap cannot be closed without adopting a combination of deep program cuts and higher taxes. That was the governor's message as he pledged to continue squeezing government programs for more savings while also opening the door to possible tax hikes.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 24, 1990
A FRIEND of mine is going through a mid-life crisis and thinking about a career move from high school geometry teacher to ventriloquist.My feeling on the subject is this: We have far more lawyers in this country than we'll ever need. We also have too many newspaper columnists, pimps (that may be redundant) and car salesmen (ditto). Probably too many geometry teachers, too.But we have not yet reached the saturation point on ventriloquists, and the industry, while "soft" at the moment, could probably use an infusion of fresh talent.
NEWS
May 12, 1994
When Gov. William Donald Schaefer took office in 1987, he embraced a large challenge: to reform the delivery of social services so the millions spent in Maryland actually improve the lives of children and families who need government help.With a boost from the Annie E. Casey Foundation -- which, this summer, moves its headquarters to Baltimore -- Maryland has made great strides in coordinating the various departments, agencies and programs that provide services ranging from foster care to mental health services to special educational placements.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | October 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - Wednesday, Oct. 3: I call my doctor to plead for Cipro, the antibiotic that may not work on the Deadly Anthrax Virus but then again may. I tell him a man in Florida near the hijackers' training ground has been stricken. "Was he a farmer?" my doctor asks. "I don't know," I say. "I don't care. I want my Cipro." He mutters something about an epidemic of inanity. I explain that the terrorists are coming back to finish the job here, where they were interrupted; that they've been cyaniding dogs and Sarin-ing bunnies in Afghanistan; and that I've even heard of neighbors fashioning safe rooms with special lighting to kill viruses.
NEWS
By TRB | November 29, 1990
GEORGE BUSH says he's learned his lesson. No more new taxes, and this time he really means it. In fact, he seriously regrets . . . ''being forced'' by big-spending Democrats to raise taxes the last time. Of course ''no new taxes'' was always, as the Wall Street Journal put it, ''the Big Lie of the great budget debate.''Mr. Bush's choices were a fiscal calamity, a tax increase, or spending cuts too unpopular to propose. Through months of demagoguery, he never did propose spending cuts anywhere near equal to the tax increase he supposedly wanted to avoid.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | September 27, 2013
There has been great controversy regarding the forcible removal of a Howard County parent from a Maryland State Department of Education town hall meeting a week ago after he insisted on orally asking a politically inconvenient question about the Common Core curriculum. Only written questions were allowed. Robert Small was roughly grabbed and physically removed from the meeting and humiliated and handcuffed, although charges of assaulting an officer were later dropped by Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger.
NEWS
May 15, 2012
America was built on the ideas that one could work hard, sacrifice and save, to have a better life. I worked hard for years and years in school, I sacrificed and saved, and now I wake up early every weekday and many weekends to go to work, where I provide services to the public at a very high price to myself, and often to the recipients of my services. As our lawmakers embark upon the first day of this special session, I wish to call to their minds the very purpose of their being there: to formulate laws.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | February 19, 1995
My advice to you, if you ever get invited to play the part of a corpse in an opera, is: Ask questions. Here are some that I would suggest:1. Does the plot of this opera call for the corpse to get shoved halfway off a bed headfirst by people shrieking in Italian?2. If so, is this corpse wearing a nightgown-style garment that could easily get bunched up around the corpse's head if the corpse finds itself in an inverted position with its legs sticking up in the air on a brightly lit stage in front of hundreds of people?
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | January 16, 1992
Carefully arranged on a bed of ice, the fish on the counter at Capitol Seafood in Jessup looked like a still-life composition.Gold-striped wild rockfish, their lips sporting blue plastic tags, lay in the upper left corner. Just below them were the smaller, dish-faced hybrid rocks raised on farms. To the right, the bright color of several red snappers contrasted with the plain brown of the flounder below.Framed by these lesser species, two large, silver-sided creatures formed the composition's centerpiece.
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