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Liposuction

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NEWS
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,BOSTON GLOBE | December 3, 1995
"An odd act of literary liposuction" is how Daniel Zalewski describes in the December Lingua Franca what HarperCollins editor Hershel Parker performed on Herman Melville's arcane 1852 novel "Pierre, or The Ambiguities," which is coming soon to a mall near you.One 19th-century review was headlined "Herman Melville Crazy." HarperCollins decided the wordy novel needed to be made more accessible, leading to Mr. Parker's excision of an episode.The episode is the narrator's sudden, belated announcement, two-thirds of the way into the novel, that Pierre has a literary career, one that is, in Mr. Zalewski's words, "suspiciously similar to Melville's own."
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
State health investigators suspect that a deadly outbreak of infections at Monarch Medspa in Timonium last year may have stemmed from "visibly dirty" equipment or two health care workers who carried the same bacterium found in patients, according to a report released Friday. The investigation found that doctors and nurses sometimes failed to wear gloves and that there was no separation of sterilized and dirty equipment. Health officials inspected the facility and interviewed patients after three infections were reported in September 2012; one of those patients, a 59-year-old Lochearn woman, died days after undergoing liposuction.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
A 59-year-old Lochearn woman died Monday of a rare infection after liposuction surgery, and two other patients have also contracted infections, prompting health officials Wednesday to shut down the Timonium cosmetic surgery center where each was treated. Monarch Medspa officials are cooperating as Maryland and Baltimore County health officials investigate the source of the infections, which involve the same bacteria that causes strep throat. But the bacteria can be significantly more dangerous when infecting other parts of the body, sometimes causing shock, organ failure and even death.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland health officials may ask state lawmakers for permission to oversee plastic surgery centers, a move inspired in part by the death of a Lochearn woman after liposuction. The state health department had already been considering whether to ask for a change to the legal definition of free-standing surgery centers to align regulations with medical risk instead of insurance billing practices, Secretary Joshua Sharfstein said. Surgical centers currently are subject to state inspection only if they meet certain criteria in how they bill insurance companies, he said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
State health investigators suspect that a deadly outbreak of infections at Monarch Medspa in Timonium last year may have stemmed from "visibly dirty" equipment or two health care workers who carried the same bacterium found in patients, according to a report released Friday. The investigation found that doctors and nurses sometimes failed to wear gloves and that there was no separation of sterilized and dirty equipment. Health officials inspected the facility and interviewed patients after three infections were reported in September 2012; one of those patients, a 59-year-old Lochearn woman, died days after undergoing liposuction.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2012
For men and women attempting to lose those last few pounds, surgery may not be an option. Earlier this year, Dr. Eric Chang of Columbia Aesthetic Plastic Surgery began offering “CoolSculpting,” which he describes as a safe, noninvasive alternative to liposuction. “It is so popular because everyone is looking for something with no downtime for recovery and without the risk of surgery,” he says. During the treatment, a specially designed device takes the targeted fat tissue between cooling panels for a process called cryolipolysis to freeze fat cells.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | November 24, 2006
Why is it important for people with diabetes to check their feet regularly? Diabetes can impair blood flow to and nerve sensitivity in the feet. Poor circulation means that tiny cuts, ulcerations, cracks in the skin or other minor injuries can get infected, and, because of poor nerve function, a person with diabetes may not know it. Untreated infections can progress so quickly that the foot or lower leg may have to be amputated. There were nearly 82,000 such amputations among diabetics in 2002, according to the National Diabetes Education Program, part of the National Institutes of Health.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland is moving to toughen regulations on the fast-growing medspa industry - a move designed to narrow a "loophole" and prevent deaths such as one last year following a liposuction treatment at a Timonium facility. Regulations being discussed by state officials would bar plastic surgeons from performing liposuction and other procedures in medspas and medical offices unless the facilities are inspected by the government or third-party accrediting bodies, Maryland Secretary of Health Joshua Sharfstein said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 25, 1999
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil -- "Fantastic plastic beauty!" shouted samba dancers in a parade celebrating plastic surgery during Rio's Carnival this year.The homage continues: Even as Brazil sinks into a recession, with unemployment historically high, the nation's vain and affluent are rushing to cosmetic surgeons in greater numbers than ever, trend-watchers here report."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
It's a common refrain in Gia D'Anna's office: Extra inches that childbirth or time left around the middle are resisting diet and exercise. D'Anna is the office manager for a Lutherville plastic surgeon, and, as a mother, she sympathizes with the patients. She just got her own flat tummy back last year. Her boss, Dr. Ronald H. Schuster, had bought a machine that aimed to zap muffin tops and love handles via low temperatures. He was looking for volunteers on the staff before he rolled out the service to patients.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland is moving to toughen regulations on the fast-growing medspa industry - a move designed to narrow a "loophole" and prevent deaths such as one last year following a liposuction treatment at a Timonium facility. Regulations being discussed by state officials would bar plastic surgeons from performing liposuction and other procedures in medspas and medical offices unless the facilities are inspected by the government or third-party accrediting bodies, Maryland Secretary of Health Joshua Sharfstein said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
A 59-year-old Lochearn woman died Monday of a rare infection after liposuction surgery, and two other patients have also contracted infections, prompting health officials Wednesday to shut down the Timonium cosmetic surgery center where each was treated. Monarch Medspa officials are cooperating as Maryland and Baltimore County health officials investigate the source of the infections, which involve the same bacteria that causes strep throat. But the bacteria can be significantly more dangerous when infecting other parts of the body, sometimes causing shock, organ failure and even death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
It's a common refrain in Gia D'Anna's office: Extra inches that childbirth or time left around the middle are resisting diet and exercise. D'Anna is the office manager for a Lutherville plastic surgeon, and, as a mother, she sympathizes with the patients. She just got her own flat tummy back last year. Her boss, Dr. Ronald H. Schuster, had bought a machine that aimed to zap muffin tops and love handles via low temperatures. He was looking for volunteers on the staff before he rolled out the service to patients.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2012
For men and women attempting to lose those last few pounds, surgery may not be an option. Earlier this year, Dr. Eric Chang of Columbia Aesthetic Plastic Surgery began offering “CoolSculpting,” which he describes as a safe, noninvasive alternative to liposuction. “It is so popular because everyone is looking for something with no downtime for recovery and without the risk of surgery,” he says. During the treatment, a specially designed device takes the targeted fat tissue between cooling panels for a process called cryolipolysis to freeze fat cells.
HEALTH
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Lisa Kurts works out five days a week, eats right and stays out of the sun. Her beauty regimen gets more complicated from there, with injections, creams and prescription medication — much of it aimed at enhancing the beauty of her eyes. "Your eyes stand out," said Kurts, 44, of Millers Island, a regular at BE Lifestyle Luxury Medspa in Towson who uses high-end eye creams and a prescription eyelash-growing medication and has had Botox and Juvederm injections around the eyes. "I try to make them look as young as possible.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | November 24, 2006
Why is it important for people with diabetes to check their feet regularly? Diabetes can impair blood flow to and nerve sensitivity in the feet. Poor circulation means that tiny cuts, ulcerations, cracks in the skin or other minor injuries can get infected, and, because of poor nerve function, a person with diabetes may not know it. Untreated infections can progress so quickly that the foot or lower leg may have to be amputated. There were nearly 82,000 such amputations among diabetics in 2002, according to the National Diabetes Education Program, part of the National Institutes of Health.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 26, 1997
To accept ourselves as we are or to re-create ourselves in some other image? It's a difficult question, with strong arguments on either side. To see what the experts have to say about it, we attended two recent programs in the Baltimore area. The following information was gleaned from "I Am A Beautiful Person," part of the Wellness Series lectures sponsored by Sheppard Pratt, and "What's New in Cosmetic Surgery: Find Out What It Can Do For You," part of the spring seminar schedule at the Women's Mid-Life Center at Sinai WellBridge Fitness Center.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland health officials may ask state lawmakers for permission to oversee plastic surgery centers, a move inspired in part by the death of a Lochearn woman after liposuction. The state health department had already been considering whether to ask for a change to the legal definition of free-standing surgery centers to align regulations with medical risk instead of insurance billing practices, Secretary Joshua Sharfstein said. Surgical centers currently are subject to state inspection only if they meet certain criteria in how they bill insurance companies, he said.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | June 27, 2004
BAD NEWS for the Ehrlich administration: Tax revenue for the current budget year is $149 million higher than projected; 8,100 jobs were added last month in Maryland; and the persistent $800 million budget deficit could fall to $252 million or so by next summer. If that sort of thing continues, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will have difficulty explaining his nearly across-the-board budget-cutting of up to 12 percent. What we have is strategy overtaken by events. You can adopt a slash-and-burn style with impunity under cover of a down economy and a big deficit.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 4, 2001
NORRISTOWN, Pa. -- The Montgomery County, Pa., district attorney will not pursue criminal charges against Richard P. Glunk, a plastic surgeon whose 18-year-old patient died two days after undergoing liposuction in his King of Prussia office. "There was insufficient evidence of criminal negligence to warrant filing homicide charges against Dr. Glunk or any of the medical people who treated Amy Fledderman," District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. said late Friday. Fledderman, of Newtown Square, Pa., died May 25 of complications from the fat-suctioning surgery on her chin and abdomen.
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