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By STEPHEN HUNTER and STEPHEN HUNTER,Sun Film Critic | September 21, 1990
I like a movie that takes a moral stand. Martin Scorsese's "GoodFellas," a violent look at the authentic Mafia, focuses exclusively on the deadly tools of the trade. It makes the clear and resonant point that Italian sausage should be banned.Before and after every hit, these swarthy, laughing tribal barbarians settle down to a hearty meal, a curly tube of dead pig smothered in glops of tomato guts, shreds of pepper, basil, oregano, garlic slices, fennel, fried onion, some Chianti, wads of bread soaked in butter.
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By Jeremy Caplan and Jeremy Caplan,NEWSDAY | April 18, 2004
When Ray Liotta first worked on Broadway, he wasn't anywhere near the stage. "I put the candy out, sold it before the show and during intermission, and then went home with $7 in my pocket," says the Hollywood veteran. "I used to do what that guy's doing," he says, motioning to a concession salesman in the Plymouth Theater, where, more than two decades after manning the M&Ms, Liotta is making his Broadway debut in Match. "It was a great job to have, because you got to watch people on stage, and you learned," says Liotta, 48. After growing up in New Jersey and graduating from the University of Miami in 1977, Liotta moved to New York to get started in acting.
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By Lou Cedrone | February 20, 1991
Ray Liotta, who plays a mobster in ''GoodFellas'' (''From the time I was a kid, I always wanted to be with the mob,'' he says in the movie), wasn't worried about playing a bad guy. ''Not after doing doing 'Dominic and Eugene' and 'Field of Dreams','' he said. ''Those were very sympathetic roles.''He really has the lead role in ''GoodFellas.'' Robert De Niro is the ''star,'' but he has much less screen time than Liotta.Martin Scorsese directed. That's a lot of name power, but Liotta said he wasn't intimidated.
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
Sylvester Stallone is enjoying a wave of publicity these days extolling his high-mindedness for accepting less than his usual mega-millions to appear in a "serious film." But after seeing "Cop Land," a question naturally arises: Has Stallone really done anyone any favors?It's not that Stallone, who plays a lumpish, slow-witted New Jersey sheriff, embarrasses himself in "Cop Land." His is a modest, unshowy performance, expressing a genuineness absent from virtually every other Stallone picture since the first "Rocky."
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
Sylvester Stallone is enjoying a wave of publicity these days extolling his high-mindedness for accepting less than his usual mega-millions to appear in a "serious film." But after seeing "Cop Land," a question naturally arises: Has Stallone really done anyone any favors?It's not that Stallone, who plays a lumpish, slow-witted New Jersey sheriff, embarrasses himself in "Cop Land." His is a modest, unshowy performance, expressing a genuineness absent from virtually every other Stallone picture since the first "Rocky."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 10, 1997
Now if you saw a giggly Ray Liotta, with those nut-case, flashbulb-bright eyes, sitting in chains aboard an airliner on which you were about to fly to L.A. during a storm, what would you do? Take Greyhound, and leave the driving to them, right? Me, too. Even if I were the pilot.But no, the pilot and the flight crew, four U.S. marshals and about six passengers climb aboard on Christmas Eve. Bad idea.The movie is "Turbulence" and it's about as dumb as a pet mouse, but, in a sub-IQ way, quite a slick little ride.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1996
Linda Fiorentino as a good girl!She's just one of the surprises in "Unforgettable," a violent, creepy thriller in which Fiorentino, the ultimate femme fatale in "The Last Seduction," co-stars with Ray Liotta.John Dahl, who also directed "Seduction," keeps the twists coming in a pretty twisted story, contrived but entertaining. Liotta stars as a medical examiner who is obsessed with solving his wife's murder -- especially since he was arrested for the crime and, although the charges were dismissed, is still assumed to be the killer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 29, 1994
"No Escape" plays like "Mad Max" set on the planet of the Ewoks.Looting imagery and themes from just about every known source of popular culture except Mickey Mouse cartoons (oh, I suppose you could argue the whole movie is Mickey Mouse), it features Ray Liotta as a Mel Gibson wannabe who helps a tribe of colorfully garbed losers escape from the ignominy of circumstances in a world where civilization has collapsed.No, it's not set in Hollywood and yes, it's as mixed up as a bowl of alphabet soup in Cyrillic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
You can tell a great thriller from a merely good thriller simply by the territory in which it is set. Great thrillers are set in the world and obey the laws of the world, including physics and probability; good thrillers are set in a country called Stupidland, and obey nothing except the writer's imagination.Alas, "Unlawful Entry" is set in Stupidland.It follows as an unstable cop, played in high geeky splendor by Ray Liotta, acquires an unhealthy fascination with a yuppie couple to whose assistance he comes after a traumatic house break-in.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
You can tell a great thriller from a merely good thriller simply by the territory in which it is set. Great thrillers are set in the world and obey the laws of the world, including physics and probability; good thrillers are set in a country called Stupidland, and obey nothing except the writer's imagination.Alas, "Unlawful Entry" is set in Stupidland.It follows as an unstable cop, played in high geeky splendor by Ray Liotta, acquires an unhealthy fascination with a yuppie couple to whose assistance he comes after a traumatic house break-in.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 10, 1997
Now if you saw a giggly Ray Liotta, with those nut-case, flashbulb-bright eyes, sitting in chains aboard an airliner on which you were about to fly to L.A. during a storm, what would you do? Take Greyhound, and leave the driving to them, right? Me, too. Even if I were the pilot.But no, the pilot and the flight crew, four U.S. marshals and about six passengers climb aboard on Christmas Eve. Bad idea.The movie is "Turbulence" and it's about as dumb as a pet mouse, but, in a sub-IQ way, quite a slick little ride.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1996
Linda Fiorentino as a good girl!She's just one of the surprises in "Unforgettable," a violent, creepy thriller in which Fiorentino, the ultimate femme fatale in "The Last Seduction," co-stars with Ray Liotta.John Dahl, who also directed "Seduction," keeps the twists coming in a pretty twisted story, contrived but entertaining. Liotta stars as a medical examiner who is obsessed with solving his wife's murder -- especially since he was arrested for the crime and, although the charges were dismissed, is still assumed to be the killer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 29, 1994
"No Escape" plays like "Mad Max" set on the planet of the Ewoks.Looting imagery and themes from just about every known source of popular culture except Mickey Mouse cartoons (oh, I suppose you could argue the whole movie is Mickey Mouse), it features Ray Liotta as a Mel Gibson wannabe who helps a tribe of colorfully garbed losers escape from the ignominy of circumstances in a world where civilization has collapsed.No, it's not set in Hollywood and yes, it's as mixed up as a bowl of alphabet soup in Cyrillic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
You can tell a great thriller from a merely good thriller simply by the territory in which it is set. Great thrillers are set in the world and obey the laws of the world, including physics and probability; good thrillers are set in a country called Stupidland, and obey nothing except the writer's imagination.Alas, "Unlawful Entry" is set in Stupidland.It follows as an unstable cop, played in high geeky splendor by Ray Liotta, acquires an unhealthy fascination with a yuppie couple to whose assistance he comes after a traumatic house break-in.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
You can tell a great thriller from a merely good thriller simply by the territory in which it is set. Great thrillers are set in the world and obey the laws of the world, including physics and probability; good thrillers are set in a country called Stupidland, and obey nothing except the writer's imagination.Alas, "Unlawful Entry" is set in Stupidland.It follows as an unstable cop, played in high geeky splendor by Ray Liotta, acquires an unhealthy fascination with a yuppie couple to whose assistance he comes after a traumatic house break-in.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 13, 1992
"Article 99" desperately wants to be "Catch-22" or "M*A*S*H" but it's too short by half and too loud by twice.Conceived as a searing indictment of the mess in VA hospitals, it ultimately founders on its own unwillingness to be an issue movie. It wants it both ways: to open eyes and to entertain and when it tries to entertain, it closes eyes with the same old movie blarney.Kiefer Sutherland, in a role so underwritten you hardly notice him, plays an earnest young surgeon who signs up for a residency in a VA hospital merely as a ticket-punching exercise on the way to a prosperous suburban practice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 13, 1992
"Article 99" desperately wants to be "Catch-22" or "M*A*S*H" but it's too short by half and too loud by twice.Conceived as a searing indictment of the mess in VA hospitals, it ultimately founders on its own unwillingness to be an issue movie. It wants it both ways: to open eyes and to entertain and when it tries to entertain, it closes eyes with the same old movie blarney.Kiefer Sutherland, in a role so underwritten you hardly notice him, plays an earnest young surgeon who signs up for a residency in a VA hospital merely as a ticket-punching exercise on the way to a prosperous suburban practice.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 13, 1992
"Article 99" desperately wants to be "Catch-22" or "M*A*S*H" but it's too short by half and too loud by twice.Conceived as a searing indictment of the mess in VA hospitals, it ultimately founders on its own unwillingness to be an issue movie. It wants it both ways: to open eyes and to entertain and when it tries to entertain, it closes eyes with the same old movie blarney.Kiefer Sutherland, in a role so underwritten you hardly notice him, plays an earnest young surgeon who signs up for a residency in a VA hospital merely as a ticket-punching exercise on the way to a prosperous suburban practice.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 13, 1992
"Article 99" desperately wants to be "Catch-22" or "M*A*S*H" but it's too short by half and too loud by twice.Conceived as a searing indictment of the mess in VA hospitals, it ultimately founders on its own unwillingness to be an issue movie. It wants it both ways: to open eyes and to entertain and when it tries to entertain, it closes eyes with the same old movie blarney.Kiefer Sutherland, in a role so underwritten you hardly notice him, plays an earnest young surgeon who signs up for a residency in a VA hospital merely as a ticket-punching exercise on the way to a prosperous suburban practice.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | February 20, 1991
Ray Liotta, who plays a mobster in ''GoodFellas'' (''From the time I was a kid, I always wanted to be with the mob,'' he says in the movie), wasn't worried about playing a bad guy. ''Not after doing doing 'Dominic and Eugene' and 'Field of Dreams','' he said. ''Those were very sympathetic roles.''He really has the lead role in ''GoodFellas.'' Robert De Niro is the ''star,'' but he has much less screen time than Liotta.Martin Scorsese directed. That's a lot of name power, but Liotta said he wasn't intimidated.
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