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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
With the broad appeal of a fast-food chain — 54 million people served in 14 countries on five continents — "The Lion King" enjoys a mighty status on Broadway, where it's the seventh-longest-running musical and has packed them in since 1997. The show isn't likely to lose its appeal on tour any time soon, either. When it first played the Hippodrome in 2005, it was a 14-week smash, raking in $15 million. It's back at the theater for a monthlong engagement that is bound to be just as fruitful, nicely timed as it is for the holidays, when families with kids need diversions even more.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
The curtain-raising scene of Jesus appearing "in ancient upstate New York" is the first little clue that "The Book of Mormon" is not your average Broadway musical. By the time the show ends, every politically incorrect button has been pushed, every doorbell rung. With true missionary zeal, the creators of this hugely popular work, which reaches Baltimore on Tuesday, satirize not just one religion, but all of them. Various peoples, practices and conditions are heartily targeted in the process, too. But when all is said, sung and stung, "Book of Mormon" is really a big, old-fashioned musical, one with the same basic structure that served Rodgers and Hammerstein so well.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
With a staging as intricate as "The Lion King," the right personnel have to be backstage making everything click into place night after night. Bruce Paul Reik, a Milwaukee native who calls Baltimore home, is one of the puppet assistants on the national tour of the musical, responsible for maintenance and repair. "So much has to happen before each show goes on," said Reik. "Getting Scar hooked up is pretty involved. There's a mechanical aspect to his headgear. " All of the costumes are checked out each week; those of the principal characters are checked every day. "During a show, I'm working in triage in the puppet and mask emergency room," Reik said.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Your browser does not support iframes.   This won't rank among the best of the MLB Fan Cave productions , but if you're interested in watching Tommy Hunter and some proud Baltimoreans serenade the Orioles' third baseman with a rendition of "Hakuna Machado" look no further than the video above. The song-- which obviously is sung to the tune of " Hakuna Matata" from "The Lion King" -- also features cameos from Adam Jones, J.J. Hardy and Boog Powell, among others.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
NEW ORLEANS -- The old lion is about to stalk into the football jungle one last time Sunday night before retracting his claws for good. And the young lion is eager to pounce on the throne that retiring Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis has owned for 17 years. San Francisco 49ers star inside linebacker Patrick Willis has a deep respect for Lewis, his longtime friend and mentor, but he can't wait to become the new Lion King. Ever since Willis forged a relationship with Lewis, built through their mutual friendship with former 49ers coach and Ravens linebackers coach Mike Singletary, the 28-year-old six-time Pro Bowl selection has referred to Lewis as Mufasa, as in the Lion King.
FEATURES
By Janine DeFao and Janine DeFao,McClatchy News Service | June 27, 1994
With the opening of Disney's much-heralded "The Lion King," some parents may worry that hidden among catchy tunes and state-of-the-art animation lurks a danger to little psyches.Some critics have greeted Disney's 32nd animated film with warnings about the lion king's "disturbing on-screen death" and "scenes of truly terrifying animal kingdom violence."Early in the film, its hero, the precious lion cub, Simba, loses his father in a wildebeest stampede provoked by his evil uncle Scar, who wants to be king.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1995
Who's the king of the local video jungle? "The Lion King."A week after its release, the videocassette of the hit Disney movie has set national sales records, but it remains in stock at Baltimore-area outlets.An informal survey yesterday of a variety of stores showed that sales have been brisk since last Tuesday -- and even before, at outlets that had a pre-release order promotion, such as Blockbuster and West Coast Video stores.But most places contacted had the video in ample stock, at prices ranging from $15.95 to $18.99.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 24, 1994
It's good to be the king.This is the thrust of "The Lion King," the new Disney animated feature film opening today, which wants to be about fathers and sons but can't quite break free of the fact that it's about kings and princes. Although it's state of the art, one might say that in terms of its values, it's the best animated film of the 19th century.Beautifully mounted and dynamically told, it follows Simba, Prince of the Beasts, son of the mighty Mufassa (James Earl Jones), current holder of the kingship.
FEATURES
By Anita M. Busch and Anita M. Busch,Hollywood Reporter | February 23, 1994
While McDonald's is banking on Bedrock, arch-rival Burger King hopes to reap the lion's share with the tried and true this summer: a Walt Disney animated family film.Burger King is readying what is believed to be its largest promotional program to date for the animated "The Lion King" with an estimated $18 million to $20 million in media support over an eight-week run. That would surpass its previous promotional effort on Disney's box office blockbuster "Aladdin," which added an estimated $15 million to $17 million in media.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 17, 1994
THE LION KINGOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Walt Disney 60858)Despite Disney's reputation for pop market savvy, most of the studio's feature-length cartoons don't hold up at album length. Sure, there's always a hit or two on hand, along with a couple of spirited production numbers, but once past those, the listener is usually left with barren stretches of boring background music. Maybe that's why the soundtrack album for "The Lion King" became a best seller even before the movie was unleashed.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 18, 2013
It's about an hour before showtime, and 16-year-old NicKayla Tucker, of Laurel, is obviously enjoying the last-minute preparations for her NicKayla & Friends concert Saturday at the Comfort Inn in Beltsville. Dressed in Nike pants and a muscle T-shirt, she joined her dancers in a number, stood back and watched, gave them a few instructions, and rejoined the action, smiling throughout and exuding an energy that's contagious. "Hey, can you play 'No Permission,' " she asked her sound crew in the back of the auditorium, a song she wrote and planed to perform for the show.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
NEW ORLEANS -- The old lion is about to stalk into the football jungle one last time Sunday night before retracting his claws for good. And the young lion is eager to pounce on the throne that retiring Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis has owned for 17 years. San Francisco 49ers star inside linebacker Patrick Willis has a deep respect for Lewis, his longtime friend and mentor, but he can't wait to become the new Lion King. Ever since Willis forged a relationship with Lewis, built through their mutual friendship with former 49ers coach and Ravens linebackers coach Mike Singletary, the 28-year-old six-time Pro Bowl selection has referred to Lewis as Mufasa, as in the Lion King.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | December 13, 2011
"The Lion King" still roars. This 1997 Broadway musical is still running in New York. A touring version was a box office smash during a 14-week run at Baltimore's Hippodrome Theatre in 2005 and now the musical has returned for a month-long stay. Judging from all of the smiling children at a recent performance, this show is a wonderful family activity for the holiday season. The kids weren't the only ones smiling, laughing and pointing, because "The Lion King" knows how to please a crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
With the broad appeal of a fast-food chain — 54 million people served in 14 countries on five continents — "The Lion King" enjoys a mighty status on Broadway, where it's the seventh-longest-running musical and has packed them in since 1997. The show isn't likely to lose its appeal on tour any time soon, either. When it first played the Hippodrome in 2005, it was a 14-week smash, raking in $15 million. It's back at the theater for a monthlong engagement that is bound to be just as fruitful, nicely timed as it is for the holidays, when families with kids need diversions even more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
With a staging as intricate as "The Lion King," the right personnel have to be backstage making everything click into place night after night. Bruce Paul Reik, a Milwaukee native who calls Baltimore home, is one of the puppet assistants on the national tour of the musical, responsible for maintenance and repair. "So much has to happen before each show goes on," said Reik. "Getting Scar hooked up is pretty involved. There's a mechanical aspect to his headgear. " All of the costumes are checked out each week; those of the principal characters are checked every day. "During a show, I'm working in triage in the puppet and mask emergency room," Reik said.
EXPLORE
December 2, 2011
Students at the Catonsville Education Center are among those from four Baltimore County public schools who will get to see a performance of "Disney's The Lion King" for free at the Hippodrome Theater Dec. 8. In addition to seeing the musical, fourth- and fifth-graders at the school on South Chapelgate Lane for children with special education needs will also participate in two related in-school workshops, thanks to Donna Wasserbach, ...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 10, 2005
The Lion King will play a 14-week engagement, the longest of any touring show in Baltimore theater history, at the Hippodrome Theatre this summer. "It hasn't played the mid-Atlantic. It has a huge following from the family standpoint," Marks Chowning, executive director of the Hippodrome, said of the musical's ability to sustain such a long run. "I think it just has the same kind of broad appeal that the really successful, long-running shows have had." The run begins June 2 and concludes Sept.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 1996
OAKLAND MILLS resident Pat Muth, artistic director at Columbia Ice Rink, will present "Pocahontas" and "The Lion King," an ice extravaganza performed by members of the Columbia Figure Skating Club this Saturday and Sunday at the Columbia Ice Rink on Thunder Hill Road at the Oakland Mills Village Center.East Columbia performers skating major roles in the "Circle of Life" are Lauren Clark as Scar, Amanda Buckler as Old Simba and Amy Buckler as young Nala in "The Lion King."Many of the skaters have competed in the South Atlantic and Junior National competitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Next season at the Hippodrome Theatre , a character in an iconic outfit will fly off the stage and into the house, soaring high above wide-eyed spectators. The chances of a mishap during this show-stopping feat are just about nil, however, since we're not talking about the guy who is supposed to zip effortlessly through the air in that unlucky monolith of a musical called "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. " Baltimore audiences will see instead a primly dressed woman with an umbrella over one arm — the famed governess who takes charge of children and adults alike in the well-traveled Broadway revival of "Mary Poppins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Conviction, passion and creativity crackle and swing with a jazzy euphoria when you talk to Julie Taymor about art, whether the tragicomedy of the Bard or the myth-making of Marvel Comics. The director who brought experimental techniques to the Great White Way with "The Lion King" returns to screen and stage this winter with a rare aesthetic one-two combination. Taymor has unveiled a lyrical, thrilllingly lucid film of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," starring Helen Mirren, while completing the hugely ambitious and elaborate Broadway musical, " Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," which boasts a score by Bono and the Edge.
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