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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2003
In a step to help the Linux operating system gain popularity among government and corporate users, International Business Machines Corp. and SuSE Linux AG plan to announce today that they have achieved security certification for Linux from the U.S. government, a first for the free operating system. The government, under the direction of the Pentagon's Defense Information Security Agency, has revamped its certification standards process in the past year to improve the security of computer systems as part of the effort to strengthen domestic security.
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BUSINESS
By Dwight Silverman and Dwight Silverman,Houston Chronicle | November 29, 2007
HOUSTON -- In early 2006, tech news Web sites were abuzz with rumors that Google was preparing to release its own personal computer, a low-cost machine it would sell through Wal-Mart. Google and Wal-Mart denied it and, as many tech rumors go, it faded into obscurity. But just because it was a bad rumor doesn't necessarily mean it was a bad idea. Now, Everex and a company called gOS have teamed to build such a beast, with Google only peripherally involved. The TC2502 gPC costs $199, and through the rest of this year will be sold exclusively through Wal-Mart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 2003
Linus Torvalds, receiver of stolen goods? That's the assertion of a Utah software company whose lawsuit against IBM Corp. threatens to cripple the surging popularity of the Linux operating system. You know Linux, the powerful operating system software that anybody can download off the Internet at no charge. Torvalds is the legendary Finnish-born programmer who developed its kernel - the core software that handles Linux's most basic functions - and for whom the software is named. Once scorned as a toy for nerds, Linux is now so powerful and versatile that it can do most of the tasks once reserved for expensive operating systems such as Unix.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lou Dolinar and Lou Dolinar,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 25, 2004
I keep a museum-quality collection of PCs around my house. Motherboards, graphic cards, memory, disks and so on are frequently upgraded, swapped and replaced. Processors range from a 450 MHz Celeron to the 1.2 MHz Pentium on my laptop, and various releases of Windows. I hesitate to call my collection typical of the computing world in general, but it probably is typical of some home users. About a year and a half ago, I installed the first release of Xandros Linux on this grungy menagerie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
For some, there is a driving urge to live without Windows, a digital-age-old quest to shed the Microsoft coil worn by most who have ever used a computer. Imagine being able to do all those computer tasks you've grown accustomed to - checking e-mail, writing Word documents, balancing your checkbook, storing photos, and listening to MP3 music - on a PC that doesn't run Windows. The thought has crossed many people's minds in this Microsoft-monopoly world, but the chief alternative to Windows - the Linux operating system - has provided little hope for anyone but true geeks and Macintosh users.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
Contrary to popular belief, the cops will not arrest you if you don't use Windows. There are some interesting alternative operating systems out there -- and with perseverance, you won't go crazy trying to use them. Chief among them is Linux, the largely free, enormously geek-popular system that hard-line anti-Windows users rave about, which has Tux the penguin as its mascot. There are others, including FreeBSD, which has been around for more than 20 years in one form or another, and BeOS, which has such a hard-core following that "Be" fanatics stuck with it even after the parent company folded last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | February 7, 2000
When the lights go out, keep your PC running with power supply I was skeptical about the need for battery backup on my computers until I moved to an area that seems to lose power more frequently than Russia loses heads of state. My fate seemed to be that the house (and my computer) would go dark at the worst possible moment (while I was uploading credit card info to Amazon, or at the end of a brilliant but unsaved thought typed into my word processor). Now I don't worry about these glitches.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2000
If David Talbot of Salon were to write an article about David Talbot of Salon -- well, he wouldn't. First of all, that's so old media, so five minutes ago. Typical pack mentality, everyone rushing to jump on the same story, and saying the same thing, in the same namby-pamby, edgeless way. Talbot likes to think the 5-year-old Salon -- www.salon.com -- specializes in getting ahead of the curve. The ink was barely dry, for example, on Rick Rockwell's marriage license when Salon posted a smartly horrified review of "Who Wants to Marry a Multi-Millionaire?"
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
A small Germantown computer network security company, V-One Corp., saw its stock nearly quadruple in value yesterday after the company said it had introduced software compatible with the up-and-coming Linux operating system.V-One shares zoomed up $9.9375, closing at $13.50, a 279 percent gain. It was the most actively traded stock on U.S. markets yesterday, with 60.23 million shares changing hands -- about three and a half times its 17 million outstanding shares.By comparison, the second-most-active issue yesterday, Internet behemoth America Online Inc., which has 2.2 billion shares outstanding, saw 40.8 million shares traded.
BUSINESS
By Dwight Silverman and Dwight Silverman,Houston Chronicle | November 29, 2007
HOUSTON -- In early 2006, tech news Web sites were abuzz with rumors that Google was preparing to release its own personal computer, a low-cost machine it would sell through Wal-Mart. Google and Wal-Mart denied it and, as many tech rumors go, it faded into obscurity. But just because it was a bad rumor doesn't necessarily mean it was a bad idea. Now, Everex and a company called gOS have teamed to build such a beast, with Google only peripherally involved. The TC2502 gPC costs $199, and through the rest of this year will be sold exclusively through Wal-Mart.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2003
In a step to help the Linux operating system gain popularity among government and corporate users, International Business Machines Corp. and SuSE Linux AG plan to announce today that they have achieved security certification for Linux from the U.S. government, a first for the free operating system. The government, under the direction of the Pentagon's Defense Information Security Agency, has revamped its certification standards process in the past year to improve the security of computer systems as part of the effort to strengthen domestic security.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 2003
Linus Torvalds, receiver of stolen goods? That's the assertion of a Utah software company whose lawsuit against IBM Corp. threatens to cripple the surging popularity of the Linux operating system. You know Linux, the powerful operating system software that anybody can download off the Internet at no charge. Torvalds is the legendary Finnish-born programmer who developed its kernel - the core software that handles Linux's most basic functions - and for whom the software is named. Once scorned as a toy for nerds, Linux is now so powerful and versatile that it can do most of the tasks once reserved for expensive operating systems such as Unix.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
For some, there is a driving urge to live without Windows, a digital-age-old quest to shed the Microsoft coil worn by most who have ever used a computer. Imagine being able to do all those computer tasks you've grown accustomed to - checking e-mail, writing Word documents, balancing your checkbook, storing photos, and listening to MP3 music - on a PC that doesn't run Windows. The thought has crossed many people's minds in this Microsoft-monopoly world, but the chief alternative to Windows - the Linux operating system - has provided little hope for anyone but true geeks and Macintosh users.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
Contrary to popular belief, the cops will not arrest you if you don't use Windows. There are some interesting alternative operating systems out there -- and with perseverance, you won't go crazy trying to use them. Chief among them is Linux, the largely free, enormously geek-popular system that hard-line anti-Windows users rave about, which has Tux the penguin as its mascot. There are others, including FreeBSD, which has been around for more than 20 years in one form or another, and BeOS, which has such a hard-core following that "Be" fanatics stuck with it even after the parent company folded last year.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2000
If David Talbot of Salon were to write an article about David Talbot of Salon -- well, he wouldn't. First of all, that's so old media, so five minutes ago. Typical pack mentality, everyone rushing to jump on the same story, and saying the same thing, in the same namby-pamby, edgeless way. Talbot likes to think the 5-year-old Salon -- www.salon.com -- specializes in getting ahead of the curve. The ink was barely dry, for example, on Rick Rockwell's marriage license when Salon posted a smartly horrified review of "Who Wants to Marry a Multi-Millionaire?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | February 7, 2000
When the lights go out, keep your PC running with power supply I was skeptical about the need for battery backup on my computers until I moved to an area that seems to lose power more frequently than Russia loses heads of state. My fate seemed to be that the house (and my computer) would go dark at the worst possible moment (while I was uploading credit card info to Amazon, or at the end of a brilliant but unsaved thought typed into my word processor). Now I don't worry about these glitches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lou Dolinar and Lou Dolinar,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 25, 2004
I keep a museum-quality collection of PCs around my house. Motherboards, graphic cards, memory, disks and so on are frequently upgraded, swapped and replaced. Processors range from a 450 MHz Celeron to the 1.2 MHz Pentium on my laptop, and various releases of Windows. I hesitate to call my collection typical of the computing world in general, but it probably is typical of some home users. About a year and a half ago, I installed the first release of Xandros Linux on this grungy menagerie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sean Gallagher and Sean Gallagher,Special to the Sun | April 12, 1999
ask average people to name the most influential person in the computer industry, and you'll probably hear Microsoft's Bill Gates. Unless they're Apple fans, who will probably give the nod to founding father Steve Jobs. But for many of the world's top geeks, a third name looms even larger than those giants -- Linus Torvalds.Linus who?That's Torvalds, a quiet, self-effacing Finnish programmer who started what may be a revolution in the computer industry. In 1991, he was a college student studying computer science in Helsinki when he began work on an experimental operating system -- the critical software that controls computers and allows all other programs to run.His creation was based on Unix, which runs many of the world's most powerful computers and workstations.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
A small Germantown computer network security company, V-One Corp., saw its stock nearly quadruple in value yesterday after the company said it had introduced software compatible with the up-and-coming Linux operating system.V-One shares zoomed up $9.9375, closing at $13.50, a 279 percent gain. It was the most actively traded stock on U.S. markets yesterday, with 60.23 million shares changing hands -- about three and a half times its 17 million outstanding shares.By comparison, the second-most-active issue yesterday, Internet behemoth America Online Inc., which has 2.2 billion shares outstanding, saw 40.8 million shares traded.
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