Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLint
IN THE NEWS

Lint

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
To "Paper or plastic?" and "Obama or McCain?" add yet another wrenching personal choice: "White napkin or black?" Forget square plates. Small plates. Sauce-drizzled plates. Plate as a verb. The newest craze in fine dining is not on the table but on your lap: the color-coordinated serviette. The idea is to keep lint from marring the dining experience. At the Capital Grille in downtown Baltimore and at the chain's other locations, the staff scopes out what diners are wearing and swaps out napkins accordingly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
To "Paper or plastic?" and "Obama or McCain?" add yet another wrenching personal choice: "White napkin or black?" Forget square plates. Small plates. Sauce-drizzled plates. Plate as a verb. The newest craze in fine dining is not on the table but on your lap: the color-coordinated serviette. The idea is to keep lint from marring the dining experience. At the Capital Grille in downtown Baltimore and at the chain's other locations, the staff scopes out what diners are wearing and swaps out napkins accordingly.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By NEWSDAY | February 2, 2003
Each year in the United States, about 15,500 fires start in laundry rooms, causing about $84 million in damage. The cause: the clothes dryer. Its neighbor, the washing machine, is responsible for about $150 million in water damage in the United States and Canada because of bursting hoses. Those numbers are staggering, especially because it is not difficult to keep the laundry room and its appliances clean, dry and safe. Light maintenance and visual inspections are easy preventive measures.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 4, 2006
This is a story of how not to fix a clothes dryer. It is a tale full of lint and disappointment. If you are looking for an account of epic victory, of man over machine, look elsewhere. I fought the dryer and the dryer won. This domestic conflict began, as so many do, on a weekend. Last Sunday night, as is my custom, I was touring the grounds, emptying wastebaskets in preparation for the Monday morning arrival of the municipal trash truck. In the laundry room, I noticed that there was a load of damp clothes in the dryer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 16, 2003
The cursor has been disappearing while I browse the Internet. Any ideas as to how to stop this? I run Windows 98 with Internet Explorer 6. Let's start with the possibility that the author of a Web page wrote the underlying HTML code to make the cursor disappear when it moves over certain parts of a page. Tapping the Control key, which makes the cursor appear, usually can thwart this. Another possible issue is that your video card is making the cursor move so fast that you cannot see it. You can slow the cursor with the mouse control panel, which is reached in Windows 98 by clicking on Start, Settings and Control Panel.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 3, 1990
Keeping the washing machine happy is my responsibility.I care about its innards and its outards. Lately I've even had flashes of interest in its product, clean clothes. My curiosity in the clean-clothes area has been confined to strategic theories of fighting lint.I was recently introduced to the concept of classifying laundry either as "lint giving" or "lint receiving." These two groups must be kept apart.This concept has given me a whole new way of viewing the world. And it keeps me amused in my many idle moments.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Down at the old stables on Whatcoat Street, "Fatback" and "Moses" and the other old-timers who sell produce from horse-drawn carts are watching their way of life slip away.Within a year, the stables will give way to low-income housing in the Sandtown-Winchester area, forcing the men -- known as a-rabs -- to make choices about whether to move or give up on their decades-old form of livelihood that has put them as close to the essence of Baltimore as painted screens and steamed hard crabs.A-rabs have always had plenty of Charm City ruggedness about them, but they also have a certain intrigue, a certain flair, a certain get-what-you-pay-for charm.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 12, 2005
THERE COMES A point in your life when your house gets your birthday presents. Instead of new clothes, or a new car, you announce that what you really want is a set of screwdrivers, some towel racks or light fixtures. In keeping with that spirit on Thursday of this week - the same day, according to the birthday cognoscenti, that Sharon Stone and Osama bin Laden mark their arrival into this world - I told my family that what I wanted for my birthday was a dead mouse. Not just any mouse, but the one that has invaded our house, mocking us, sauntering around the kitchen floor as if he were out for his aerobic exercise, a mouse with an attitude.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 4, 2006
This is a story of how not to fix a clothes dryer. It is a tale full of lint and disappointment. If you are looking for an account of epic victory, of man over machine, look elsewhere. I fought the dryer and the dryer won. This domestic conflict began, as so many do, on a weekend. Last Sunday night, as is my custom, I was touring the grounds, emptying wastebaskets in preparation for the Monday morning arrival of the municipal trash truck. In the laundry room, I noticed that there was a load of damp clothes in the dryer.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 1, 2000
MY BIG Y2K worry was whether the clothes dryer would make it to 2000. It didn't. A few days before confetti fell from the sky, the old dryer decided it did not want to work in the new year. It stopped spinning. The circuit breaker flipped, shutting off electrical power to it. No amount of coaxing or tinkering could bring it back to life. It died of old age. I am not sure exactly how old this dryer was, but its model number was written in Roman numerals. The dryer's demise was a disappointing way to end the century, because a few days earlier I thought I had fixed its problems and had put it in shape to work for at least another decade.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 12, 2005
THERE COMES A point in your life when your house gets your birthday presents. Instead of new clothes, or a new car, you announce that what you really want is a set of screwdrivers, some towel racks or light fixtures. In keeping with that spirit on Thursday of this week - the same day, according to the birthday cognoscenti, that Sharon Stone and Osama bin Laden mark their arrival into this world - I told my family that what I wanted for my birthday was a dead mouse. Not just any mouse, but the one that has invaded our house, mocking us, sauntering around the kitchen floor as if he were out for his aerobic exercise, a mouse with an attitude.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 16, 2003
The cursor has been disappearing while I browse the Internet. Any ideas as to how to stop this? I run Windows 98 with Internet Explorer 6. Let's start with the possibility that the author of a Web page wrote the underlying HTML code to make the cursor disappear when it moves over certain parts of a page. Tapping the Control key, which makes the cursor appear, usually can thwart this. Another possible issue is that your video card is making the cursor move so fast that you cannot see it. You can slow the cursor with the mouse control panel, which is reached in Windows 98 by clicking on Start, Settings and Control Panel.
BUSINESS
By NEWSDAY | February 2, 2003
Each year in the United States, about 15,500 fires start in laundry rooms, causing about $84 million in damage. The cause: the clothes dryer. Its neighbor, the washing machine, is responsible for about $150 million in water damage in the United States and Canada because of bursting hoses. Those numbers are staggering, especially because it is not difficult to keep the laundry room and its appliances clean, dry and safe. Light maintenance and visual inspections are easy preventive measures.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Down at the old stables on Whatcoat Street, "Fatback" and "Moses" and the other old-timers who sell produce from horse-drawn carts are watching their way of life slip away.Within a year, the stables will give way to low-income housing in the Sandtown-Winchester area, forcing the men -- known as a-rabs -- to make choices about whether to move or give up on their decades-old form of livelihood that has put them as close to the essence of Baltimore as painted screens and steamed hard crabs.A-rabs have always had plenty of Charm City ruggedness about them, but they also have a certain intrigue, a certain flair, a certain get-what-you-pay-for charm.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 3, 1990
Keeping the washing machine happy is my responsibility.I care about its innards and its outards. Lately I've even had flashes of interest in its product, clean clothes. My curiosity in the clean-clothes area has been confined to strategic theories of fighting lint.I was recently introduced to the concept of classifying laundry either as "lint giving" or "lint receiving." These two groups must be kept apart.This concept has given me a whole new way of viewing the world. And it keeps me amused in my many idle moments.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 24, 1995
As I travel life's highways I often gaze at other people's homes and ask, "How do they vent their clothes dryer?"Getting the dryer's hot, humid exhaust and its accompanying lint out of the house has been one of my life's quests, at least during the period of my life I have spent dwelling in a rowhouse.Venting a dryer in a detached house is not a big deal. You poke the pipe carrying the dryer's exhaust out an opening in the side of the house. The ideal setup is a short, straight shot using stiff sheet metal ducting that is at least 4 inches in diameter.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
We like to think of our home as a safe haven where we can rest, unwind and enjoy times with friends and family. But there's danger lurking where you least expect it. More than half a million Marylanders suffered injuries that required hospital treatment in 2010, the most recent year statistics are available. Although health officials don't keep count of where those people were hurt, doctors and rescue workers say many injuries happen at home. However, the good news is many home dangers can be avoided.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.