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By Joe Garofoli and Joe Garofoli,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
Richard Linklater laughs at the juxtaposition. The writer/director of "Slacker," the movie that inspired the pop-culture term, is dining at San Francisco's posh Ritz-Carlton hotel. You can easily pick out the erstwhile slacker in the sea of dark suits and white hair; he's the one in the thermal pullover and jeans.This isn't a case of Slacker Goes Nob Hill. It's just Hollywood custom that Castle Rock Entertainment would house the director of its new film, "subUrbia," in swank digs. Yet six years after "Slacker" introduced Linklater to the world, the 35-year-old remains anti-Hollywood.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | March 14, 2008
Horton Hears a Who! and Chicago 10, both opening today, and that international hit Persepolis demonstrate what animation lovers have known for a dozen years. The resurgence of full-length cartoons, like that of documentaries, owes less to technical innovation than to artists' - and audience's - needs to extend the range of contemporary moviemaking. The result has been features that try to slake our thirst for poetic ways of escape - and for transformative visions of reality. Since 2001, when Richard Linklater made Waking Life, animation has been moving on dual tracks, between the jolly, zoolike landscapes of most computer-generated animation - Horton is an ebullient example - and the brooding or eccentric textures of drawn artwork mixed with CGI or hybrid techniques like computer rotoscoping and motion capture, which digitize real physical performances - as in Chicago 10. The earthy, prickly side of new animation found an early masterpiece in Waking Life.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 22, 2005
God or the devil loves Billy Bob Thornton - probably both. No one tops him at portraying the nagging morality and decency of an amoral, indecent man. The most grievous flaw in Richard Linklater's remake of Michael Ritchie's 1976 misfit juvenile baseball comedy The Bad News Bears is that it over-relies on Thornton's willingness to play an irredeemable degenerate. Walter Matthau could be a curmudgeon on the scale of W.C. Fields. But when he did the Ritchie movie, there was still some suspense to seeing how low Matthau would go in portraying an embittered ex-minor leaguer who coaches a misfit kids-league baseball team for a paycheck.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | March 4, 2007
FAST FOOD NATION -- 20th Century Fox / $27.98 Richard Linklater takes a quasi-fictional approach to a decidedly nonfiction book, Fast Food Nation, the Inconvenient Truth of the fast-food industry. In this telling, written by Linklater and the book's author, Eric Schlosser, a hamburger chain called Mickey's is a rapacious conglomerate too concerned with profit to bother with such details as the welfare of its employees, many of them illegal immigrants who are abused and discarded like so many pieces of gristle.
FEATURES
By N.Y.Times News Service | August 8, 1991
HOUSTON -- In 1989, with $23,000 in borrowed money, some of it from credit-card advances, Richard Linklater set out to make an affectionate pseudo-documentary about the alienated college graduates, neo-beatniks and assorted eccentrics in Austin, Texas, his hometown.The result was "Slacker," a shoestring production that is rapidly accumulating favorable notices and a cult following as it makes its way into theaters around the country."Slacker" has been playing at the Angelika Film Center in New York City since July 5 and has opened at theaters in Los Angeles, San Diego, Houston and Dallas.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 17, 2006
Fast Food Nation shouldn't cause audiences to lose their lunch, but it may make them wonder where it's been. Fast Food Nation (Fox Searchlight) Starring Greg Kinnear, Catalina Sandino Moreno, Ashley Johnson. Directed by Richard Linklater. Rated R. Time 106 minutes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 30, 2001
Richard Linklater has an effortlessly ironic view of big-time directing. Enthralled as he is by the classics of world filmmaking - he's a moving force behind the adventurous Austin Film Society - he loves quoting the great directors of the past with amusement as well as affection. Over the phone from Texas a month ago, he said "I'm most proud of a scene when you set up a structure and boom! - what you want to happen does happen so spontaneously." I told him that reminded me of a famous quote from John Huston: "If you do it right, the thing happens, right there on the screen."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 18, 2004
A slow flirtation with a steady burn": that's what movie-maker Richard Linklater was after when he planned Before Sunset as an 80-minute amble through Paris with an American and a Frenchwoman. The man is a novelist named Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and the woman is Celine (Julie Delpy), who inspired his new book with a life-altering one-night stand nine years before in Vienna (as chronicled in Linklater's 1995 film, Before Sunrise). They were supposed to meet in Vienna again, six months after their first tryst.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | January 27, 1995
You never outgrow your need for Austin, Texas, not even when you're Richard Linklater and capable of defecting to Hollywood at any moment.Mr. Linklater, a film director who maintains bases of operation in both Austin and Los Angeles, is not one to turn away from his origins."
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | March 4, 2007
FAST FOOD NATION -- 20th Century Fox / $27.98 Richard Linklater takes a quasi-fictional approach to a decidedly nonfiction book, Fast Food Nation, the Inconvenient Truth of the fast-food industry. In this telling, written by Linklater and the book's author, Eric Schlosser, a hamburger chain called Mickey's is a rapacious conglomerate too concerned with profit to bother with such details as the welfare of its employees, many of them illegal immigrants who are abused and discarded like so many pieces of gristle.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 17, 2006
Fast Food Nation shouldn't cause audiences to lose their lunch, but it may make them wonder where it's been. Fast Food Nation (Fox Searchlight) Starring Greg Kinnear, Catalina Sandino Moreno, Ashley Johnson. Directed by Richard Linklater. Rated R. Time 106 minutes.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
Slow down and dare to be great: That's my message to Richard Linklater, the audacious director of A Scanner Darkly. He's at a time in his career when he seems ready to follow through on any notion he finds in his creative kitchen down in Austin, Texas, then deliver it to the public no matter what stage it is in the baking process. Don't get me wrong: A Scanner Darkly isn't half-baked. It's more three-quarters-baked, and it took years to get its complicated animation to the point where it expressed the scary ups and downs of the characters and the paranoid terrors of their drug-riddled world.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 22, 2005
God or the devil loves Billy Bob Thornton - probably both. No one tops him at portraying the nagging morality and decency of an amoral, indecent man. The most grievous flaw in Richard Linklater's remake of Michael Ritchie's 1976 misfit juvenile baseball comedy The Bad News Bears is that it over-relies on Thornton's willingness to play an irredeemable degenerate. Walter Matthau could be a curmudgeon on the scale of W.C. Fields. But when he did the Ritchie movie, there was still some suspense to seeing how low Matthau would go in portraying an embittered ex-minor leaguer who coaches a misfit kids-league baseball team for a paycheck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 18, 2004
A slow flirtation with a steady burn": that's what movie-maker Richard Linklater was after when he planned Before Sunset as an 80-minute amble through Paris with an American and a Frenchwoman. The man is a novelist named Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and the woman is Celine (Julie Delpy), who inspired his new book with a life-altering one-night stand nine years before in Vienna (as chronicled in Linklater's 1995 film, Before Sunrise). They were supposed to meet in Vienna again, six months after their first tryst.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Russell and Tess Russell,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Big-budget sequels are usually the bread and butter of the summer movie season (see: Shrek 2 and Spider-Man 2). So it's surprising that one of the most anticipated follow-ups of the season made less than $2 million in its first incarnation. Richard Linklater's 1995 romance Before Sunrise, beloved by cinephiles and critics but not a box-office smash, relates the chance encounter of two strangers, Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Deply), who share an amazing night in Vienna. The film's second installment, Before Sunset (opening tomorrow in Baltimore)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 7, 2001
Richard Linklater is a wonder - and a puzzler. Hard on the heels of his expansive, brilliant animated odyssey, Waking Life, he gives us the competent, puny and claustrophobic Tape, a three-hander about friendship, betrayal and memory set entirely in a Lansing, Mich., motel room. A rendering on digital video of a play by Stephen Belber, Tape lacks the fresh language and fertile ideas of Linklater's previous vehicle for Ethan Hawke, Before Sunrise, and the freewheeling inventiveness of Waking Life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Russell and Tess Russell,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Big-budget sequels are usually the bread and butter of the summer movie season (see: Shrek 2 and Spider-Man 2). So it's surprising that one of the most anticipated follow-ups of the season made less than $2 million in its first incarnation. Richard Linklater's 1995 romance Before Sunrise, beloved by cinephiles and critics but not a box-office smash, relates the chance encounter of two strangers, Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Deply), who share an amazing night in Vienna. The film's second installment, Before Sunset (opening tomorrow in Baltimore)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 7, 2001
Richard Linklater is a wonder - and a puzzler. Hard on the heels of his expansive, brilliant animated odyssey, Waking Life, he gives us the competent, puny and claustrophobic Tape, a three-hander about friendship, betrayal and memory set entirely in a Lansing, Mich., motel room. A rendering on digital video of a play by Stephen Belber, Tape lacks the fresh language and fertile ideas of Linklater's previous vehicle for Ethan Hawke, Before Sunrise, and the freewheeling inventiveness of Waking Life.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 30, 2001
Richard Linklater has an effortlessly ironic view of big-time directing. Enthralled as he is by the classics of world filmmaking - he's a moving force behind the adventurous Austin Film Society - he loves quoting the great directors of the past with amusement as well as affection. Over the phone from Texas a month ago, he said "I'm most proud of a scene when you set up a structure and boom! - what you want to happen does happen so spontaneously." I told him that reminded me of a famous quote from John Huston: "If you do it right, the thing happens, right there on the screen."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 11, 2001
When I watched Richard Linklater's extraordinary new movie, Waking Life (at the Charles), the title of Delmore Schwartz's great short story, "In Dreams Begin Responsibilities," kept ping-ponging through my brain. When I reread the story weeks later, I found more than the title matched. Schwartz's story begins when a man enters a motion picture theater. As he relaxes anonymously "in the soft darkness," he realizes that he's viewing a silent picture of his parents' courtship. He loses himself over and over again in his parents' story, intermittently weeping and cursing at the action on the screen.
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