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By Los Angeles Times | September 10, 1990
Kelly Lynch will star opposite Rosanna Arquette in "The Linguine Incident," a quirky comedy written by Tamar Brott and Richard Shepard to be directed by Shepard in October in Los Angeles and New York. David Bowie and Marlee Matlin also star. Arnold Orgolini, Sarah Jackson and Richard Gagnon produce for Linguine Productions.
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By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 17, 2008
This version of classic linguine and clams comes together quickly if you keep canned clams in your pantry. For a simple end-of-summer side dish, toss cubed cucumbers and cubed tomatoes with salt and pepper. Saving tip: : Compare the unit prices on cans of chopped clams. You might be able to save by buying bigger clams and chopping them yourself. shopping list Linguine: $1 Garlic: 30 cents Onion: 40 cents Clams: $3.89 Parsley: 74 cents Lemon: 50 cents Wine: $1.25 Chicken broth: 35 cents Tomatoes: $2 Cucumber: $1.50 From the pantry: salt, pepper TOTAL: $11.93* Note: Prices are based on the amount of each ingredient used in the recipe.
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By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | July 17, 1996
Cream, butter, egg yolks and cheese can inflate the fat and calories in a recipe faster than any other ingredients. When all four combine in one recipe -- watch out.Reader Ellie Ramsey discovered this when she clipped a recipe for linguine imperial from the "Creme de Colorado Cookbook" published by the Junior League of Denver.The original seafood recipe had a whopping 929 calories and 62 grams of fat per serving -- more fat in one dish than a person on a 2,000-calore-a-day-diet should consume in an entire day.The streamlined recipe, lighter linguine imperial, reduced the fat by more than half and also sliced off 510 calories, but retained the original creamy, cheesy flavor.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | June 4, 2008
Ralph Brennan's New Orleans Seafood Cookbook By Ralph Brennan McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurant Cookbook, Second Edition By Bill McCormick and Doug Schmick Arnica / $19.95 / 2008 Since buying a failing restaurant in Portland 35 years ago, Bill McCormick and Doug Schmick have created an empire. If you like the restaurants, you'll like the cookbook. They focus on traditional seafood cuisine, recipes you'd expect to see on the menu of the 21 Club, circa 1955: Boston Baked Cod, Crab Imperial, Seafood Newburg and crab cakes.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | January 23, 2008
Steak with onions and balsamic vinegar cooked to a sweet glaze is a perfect dinner. Linguine with fresh basil and tomatoes makes a colorful side dish. Balsamic vinegar is made in Modena, Italy. To be sure you are buying good-quality vinegar, check the labels; grapes should be the only ingredient. Lesser-quality vinegars have brown sugar added. Top-quality balsamic vinegars are aged 25 to 50 years and are used drop by drop. Choose a medium-priced one for cooking. Wine suggestion: Hearty steak with powerful balsamic vinegar is an occasion for a powerful Italian barolo.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
My introduction to watercress came years ago when my family went hiking through Kettle Moraine in eastern Wisconsin. This stunningly beautiful range of ridges and ponds came alive with thatches of green growing in the fast-running brooks. Naturally, I had to discover for myself what this thriving vegetation was. One taste of the peppery leaf was a giveaway. It had to be watercress. I became an instant fan but had to wait for years until supermarkets caught up with my appetite. Now watercress, a harvested crop, is widely available in supermarkets and farmers' markets.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
It's summertime, and the livin' should be easy when cooking during the season of warm weather. Everything seems to slow down at this time of the year. Parents don't have to worry about their children's school schedules. For everyone, there are bonus daylight hours. I am certainly much more casual in the way I entertain during the summer. I often pick up the phone and invite friends to come for dinner on the spur of the moment. The menus I plan for such meals are simple, uncomplicated and versatile, like one I prepared several days ago. For a small group assembled at the last minute, I served pan-grilled shrimp over strands of linguine tossed with a mint pesto sauce.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 17, 2008
This version of classic linguine and clams comes together quickly if you keep canned clams in your pantry. For a simple end-of-summer side dish, toss cubed cucumbers and cubed tomatoes with salt and pepper. Saving tip: : Compare the unit prices on cans of chopped clams. You might be able to save by buying bigger clams and chopping them yourself. shopping list Linguine: $1 Garlic: 30 cents Onion: 40 cents Clams: $3.89 Parsley: 74 cents Lemon: 50 cents Wine: $1.25 Chicken broth: 35 cents Tomatoes: $2 Cucumber: $1.50 From the pantry: salt, pepper TOTAL: $11.93* Note: Prices are based on the amount of each ingredient used in the recipe.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | September 13, 2000
Item: Mrs. Paul's Meal in Minutes What you get: About 2 1/2 servings Cost: About $6 Nutritional content (1 1/2 cup serving): 180 calories; 1 gram fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 550 milligrams sodium Preparation time: 5 to 8 minutes microwave, 12 to 16 minutes stove top Review: Mrs. Paul's has two new meal kits: Shrimp Linguine and a similar shrimp stir-fry. We tried the linguine, which included vegetables and a scampi seasoning. On a positive note: The linguine defrosted easily and held its shape well.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | May 15, 1991
The price is right for a seasonal favorite -- spring's slender, tender stalks of asparagus. In this creamy pasta salad, the asparagus cooks right along with the linguine so you need only one saucepan.Dijon Asparagus Salad2 ounces linguine, broken in half1/2 pound asparagus, cut diagonally into 1 1/2 -inch pieces (1 3/4 cups)9 cherry tomatoes, quartered2 tablespoons chopped red or white onion1-3rd cup poppy seed or coleslaw salad dressing2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard1/4 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper1/4 cup toasted pine nuts or slivered almondsIn a large saucepan cook linguine in lightly salted boiling water for five minutes.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | January 23, 2008
Steak with onions and balsamic vinegar cooked to a sweet glaze is a perfect dinner. Linguine with fresh basil and tomatoes makes a colorful side dish. Balsamic vinegar is made in Modena, Italy. To be sure you are buying good-quality vinegar, check the labels; grapes should be the only ingredient. Lesser-quality vinegars have brown sugar added. Top-quality balsamic vinegars are aged 25 to 50 years and are used drop by drop. Choose a medium-priced one for cooking. Wine suggestion: Hearty steak with powerful balsamic vinegar is an occasion for a powerful Italian barolo.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | January 10, 2007
Something about scallops - especially the half-dollar-sized sea scallops - says luxury. Garnish with caviar (even if only domestic) and everyone will feel pampered. It is easy and quick to prepare. This pretty pasta fills the bill. Tip --The best scallops are "dry" scallops, which haven't been treated with sodium tripolyphosphate, which makes them absorb water. But if your fish dealer only stocks "wet" scallops, no matter. Just be sure to pat them completely dry with paper towels before sauteing them.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX | August 9, 2006
Veal can be a pricey item in the meat case, but occasionally you can find it on sale. For such a time, here's an easy pasta recipe that stretches a pound of veal to feed four. The tomato sauce mixes flavors from tangy capers and shredded basil. The dish is inspired by a recipe from In Three Easy Steps: Fabulous Food Without the Fuss, by chef Conrad Gallagher. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Linguine With Veal, Capers and Tomatoes Serves 4 -- Total time: 40 minutes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 pound veal scaloppine, cut in strips 1/2 teaspoon salt (divided use)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
It's summertime, and the livin' should be easy when cooking during the season of warm weather. Everything seems to slow down at this time of the year. Parents don't have to worry about their children's school schedules. For everyone, there are bonus daylight hours. I am certainly much more casual in the way I entertain during the summer. I often pick up the phone and invite friends to come for dinner on the spur of the moment. The menus I plan for such meals are simple, uncomplicated and versatile, like one I prepared several days ago. For a small group assembled at the last minute, I served pan-grilled shrimp over strands of linguine tossed with a mint pesto sauce.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Perhaps Whole Foods has not quite reached the Starbuckian heights of brand uber alles, but it is surely emerging as a national name. The Austin, Texas-based corporation recently brought all its 130-plus natural/gourmet stores in 25 states under the Whole Foods banner, eliminating the regional names of markets it has acquired over the years: Fresh Fields and Bread & Circus, among others. As yet, there's no compilation CD (Miles: The Vegan Sessions?), but there is The Whole Foods Market Cookbook (Clarkson Potter Publishers, 2002, $25.95)
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
My introduction to watercress came years ago when my family went hiking through Kettle Moraine in eastern Wisconsin. This stunningly beautiful range of ridges and ponds came alive with thatches of green growing in the fast-running brooks. Naturally, I had to discover for myself what this thriving vegetation was. One taste of the peppery leaf was a giveaway. It had to be watercress. I became an instant fan but had to wait for years until supermarkets caught up with my appetite. Now watercress, a harvested crop, is widely available in supermarkets and farmers' markets.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing writer | March 3, 1993
This West Coast-style pasta dish showcases some of California's freshest products. Sauteed seafood gets a blanket of cream sauce rich with ricotta, basil and artichoke hearts and dotted with sweet red bell pepper flecks. This medley of confetti tops ribbons of linguine noodles.A colorful pasta dish such as this needs nothing more as a partner than a simple salad tossed with your favorite piquant dressing. For dessert, save room for a slice of tangy citrus cake with flavors of either lemon or orange.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | January 10, 2007
Something about scallops - especially the half-dollar-sized sea scallops - says luxury. Garnish with caviar (even if only domestic) and everyone will feel pampered. It is easy and quick to prepare. This pretty pasta fills the bill. Tip --The best scallops are "dry" scallops, which haven't been treated with sodium tripolyphosphate, which makes them absorb water. But if your fish dealer only stocks "wet" scallops, no matter. Just be sure to pat them completely dry with paper towels before sauteing them.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | July 10, 2002
MAYBE IT IS the hand-lettered sign proclaiming "shrimps" that I see when I am headed to the ocean. Maybe it is the fact that shrimp seem to be good swimmers with tight bodies clad in form-fitting shells. Or maybe it is because as the temperature soars, the idea of eating something light and water-based seems very appealing. Whatever the reason, when summer hits, I want shrimp at suppertime. Recently, I ate shrimp fixed three different ways -- cloaked in bacon and barbecue sauce; tossed with linguine, broccoli and pecorino Romano cheese; and grilled, then served with chopped herbs.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | September 13, 2000
Item: Mrs. Paul's Meal in Minutes What you get: About 2 1/2 servings Cost: About $6 Nutritional content (1 1/2 cup serving): 180 calories; 1 gram fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 550 milligrams sodium Preparation time: 5 to 8 minutes microwave, 12 to 16 minutes stove top Review: Mrs. Paul's has two new meal kits: Shrimp Linguine and a similar shrimp stir-fry. We tried the linguine, which included vegetables and a scampi seasoning. On a positive note: The linguine defrosted easily and held its shape well.
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