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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
Three hours before game time last night, Orioles manager Johnny Oates was still checking the wounded list.Usually, his lineup card is completed by that time, but a spate of players with bumps and bruises meant he had to wait for medical advice before finishing the task.With the team floundering again in the standings and the stretch run upon baseball's most contested division, the Orioles will need as many healthy people as they can find to overtake the three clubs in front of them.Particularly the Toronto Blue Jays -- with Rickey Henderson creating havoc at the top of the batting order.
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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
For some fans, it's not enough in this memorable, extended Orioles' season to merely watch the games. They yearn to preserve the all-too-fleeting moments - to touch them - by buying pieces of the season. They want to own the one-of-a-kind lineup cards that manager Buck Showalter displayed in the dugout during the American League Division Series and in the championship series that continues tonight against the Royals in Kansas City. Monday's game was rained out in the best-of-seven series, in which the Orioles trail, 2-0. Fans want to own the ball J.J. Hardy hit for a home run in the division series sweep of the Detroit Tigers.
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By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
Encouraged by recent blockbuster sales of sports memorabilia, the owners of the umpire's lineup card used during Cal Ripken's record-breaking, 2,131st consecutive game last year are considering putting it up for sale.Bowling Green State University, which received the card as a donation, has contacted local memorabilia auctioneer Robert "Mr. Memorabilia" Urban and is considering selling the card through him."Maybe we ought to strike while the iron is hot," said Clif Boutelle, spokesman for the university.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
While gathering reactions from former Orioles players on the death of Paul Blair, Orioles Hall of Famer Jim Palmer shared an interesting story with me. Palmer was quick to say how much Blair, who died Thursday at the age of 69, deserved a great deal of credit for the Orioles' success during the 1960s and '70s. He was especially important to Palmer, who said he wouldn't have been a Hall of Famer and wouldn't have won three Cy Young Awards without Blair patrolling center field.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1998
The Orioles' efforts to reclaim a copy of the lineup card used in Cal Ripken's record-setting game has sent shivers through the booming memorabilia market and raised questions of ownership based on centuries-old law.The team says the lineup card that then-manager Phil Regan took home after that game, Sept. 6, 1995, is the property of the team. Lawyers for the club have filed a lawsuit claiming Regan, who left the Orioles after the 1995 season, misappropriated the card -- one of five carbon copies made that night -- for which a Baltimore collector has bid $35,650.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
After mounting a legal battle, the Orioles apparently have failed to prevent one of their former managers from selling the lineup card he filled out for the game in which Cal Ripken Jr. broke the all-time record for consecutive games played. An out-of-court settlement has been reached between the Orioles and ex-skipper Phil Regan that allowed him to sell the souvenir. Neither side is disclosing the details, but a Virginia man said he recently paid more than $40,000 for the card, as well as the one used in the previous night's game -- when Ripken tied Lou Gehrig's record -- and other assorted memorabilia from the event.
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By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1998
A Baltimore contractor and sports memorabilia collector bid $35,650 yesterday for the lineup card used in the game in which Cal Ripken broke baseball's consecutive-games record. But whether he actually buys it is up to a judge.James Ancel said he is an Orioles fan who was unable to obtain tickets for the Sept. 6, 1995, game when Ripken passed Lou Gehrig by playing in his 2,131st straight game."I guess this is my way of getting a little bit of it -- well, a lot of it," said Ancel, who turns 37 later this month.
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By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
Former Orioles manager Phil Regan, who in 1995 said he felt a part of history when he inserted Cal Ripken into the batting order for his record-setting game, has arranged for the historic lineup card and related items to be sold tomorrow.The artifacts could fetch as much as $30,000, predicts theauctioneer handling the sale.Regan, who left the Orioles after the season in which Ripken tied and then surpassed Lou Gehrig's durability record, said he gave the items to his daughter, and that she plans to keep the money.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
The original lineup card used in the game during which Cal Ripken broke baseball's consecutive-games streak has turned up in an unexpected place: the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.Former Orioles manager Phil Regan filled out the card Sept. 6, 1995, inserting Ripken into the lineup for his 2,131st consecutive game. Generally a manager makes two carbon copies, but because of the historic nature of the game, five carbons were made.Regan arranged for his copy to be auctioned off earlier this month, and a Baltimore collector bid $35,650, mistakenly thinking it was the original.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1998
The Orioles obtained a court order last night blocking the sale of a lineup card and other items from the game in which Cal Ripken broke baseball's consecutive-games record, claiming the memorabilia -- worth more than $30,000 -- belongs to the team.Former Orioles manager Phil Regan, who wrote Ripken's name into the lineup on Sept. 6, 1995, when he surpassed Lou Gehrig's durability record, kept the card and the ceremonial pen with which he filled it out. He said that he gave the items to his daughter and that she recently decided to put them up for sale.
NEWS
By KATHERINE DUNN | April 9, 2008
Stacy Berg said that since she turned 12, softball has been her whole world, but the McDonogh junior sees well beyond the diamond. Interested in politics and diversity issues, Berg, 16, belongs to several school clubs and participates in the Hadassah Teen Leadership Corps, which addresses issues facing Jewish teenagers. A veteran of the Jewish Community Center Maccabi Games, an annual Olympics-style event for Jewish teens 13 to 16, she traveled to Buenos Aires, Argentina, over winter break to play for the senior U.S. team at the Pan American Maccabi Games.
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By Dan Connolly | August 10, 2005
IT WAS a simple, sweet moment in a complicated, maddening season. Most of the fans heading into Camden Yards didn't notice. It happened at 7:01 last night, with Tampa Bay hitting coach Lee Elia and the game's four umpires standing at home plate. Orioles interim manager Sam Perlozzo appeared from the home dugout to exchange the night's lineup card. Perlozzo's lineup card. "If before the game you go out to home plate and don't think that's cool, you shouldn't be out there," Perlozzo said with a huge grin.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2004
Major League Baseball won't get any arguments from Orioles manager Lee Mazzilli over the decision to tone down its promotions for Spider-Man 2. The purist in him applauds the restraint. Faced with heavy criticism from the national media, commissioner Bud Selig announced Thursday that the league wouldn't put logos on the bases as part of its $3.6 million promotional deal with the makers of the movie, which is set for release June 30. "I'm an old traditionalist at times," Mazzilli said.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
The Orioles' lineup has become so predictable these days, first baseman Rafael Palmeiro doesn't bother to check the card that's posted on the hallway outside the clubhouse. He knows where he'll be hitting and which players will surround him. It's no mystery. Manager Lee Mazzilli has written out the same order in seven of the past eight games, with the only change coming because of injuries to Jay Gibbons and David Segui. "I think it's a good thing," Palmeiro said. "It stabilizes the lineup, and everybody feels comfortable where they are. They understand their role.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
Whether the New York Yankees knew it or not, they let the Orioles bat out of order twice last night and did not protest, even though the first of those batters, Tony Batista, drove home the game's first run with a sacrifice fly. Maybe the Yankees missed something. Maybe they knew all along and were playing the percentages. Maybe it was just overconfidence, or a feeling that they could spot the Orioles an early run and still come back. The answers weren't going to come until later, and somewhere in this convoluted mess, the two teams managed to play another drama-filled baseball game before a sellout crowd of 48,499 at Camden Yards.
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By Roch Kubatko and Joe Christensen and Roch Kubatko and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
For anyone keeping score at home last night, the Orioles batted out of order three times in the first two innings. Anytime they play the New York Yankees, there's always more going on than the standard stuff. The lineup the Orioles posted in their clubhouse and the one initially displayed on the scoreboard at Camden Yards were different from the lineup they handed the umpires before the game. The clubhouse and scoreboard version had Tony Batista batting fourth and Jay Gibbons fifth. But the official lineup card had those two hitters inverted.
SPORTS
September 18, 1999
Quote: "I feel a lot more confident writing out the lineup card this year than I did last September." -- Gene Lamont, whose Pirates lost 25 of 30 last year to finish 69-93 It's a fact: The Reds lost for only the 25th time in 71 road games.Who's hot: Pirates starters have yielded four earned runs over their past four starts.Who's not: The Cubs' Sammy Sosa is 6-for-31 (.194) since hitting homer No. 59 on Sept. 9.On deck: The Braves' Greg Maddux goes for his 19th win today.
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By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
There are a lot of officially licensed items with "2131" on them in collections across the country.But the real "2131," the large numerals that hung from the B&O warehouse during Cal Ripken's pursuit of Lou Gehrig's consecutive-games record last summer, have found a home at the Babe Ruth Museum. The banners are part of an exhibit on Ripken's streak that opened Friday.Also on display are Orioles manager Phil Regan's lineup card, the pitching rubber and second base from the record-breaking game Sept.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - With Marty Cordova's back feeling better, Orioles manager Mike Hargrove finally had his lineup at full strength last night. Cordova hit a two-run homer on Opening Day but missed the final five games of the homestand with a herniated disc in his lower back. After receiving a cortisone shot on Thursday, Cordova was instructed not to swing a bat for 48 hours. Before batting practice yesterday, he said, "It feels good. Hopefully, it'll continue to feel that way." The Tampa Bay Devil Rays started left-handed pitcher Jim Parque, so Hargrove moved switch-hitting David Segui from seventh to third in the lineup.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2001
His inside knowledge of American League batters aided Josh Towers. Because it includes No. 8, Larry Bigbie will always cherish the lineup card from the game in which he got his first major-league hit. Brian Roberts enjoyed the thrill of playing next to the man who revolutionized his position. Jerry Hairston is that rarest of birds, an Oriole who advised the Iron Man. The youngest Orioles were preparing for preschool when Cal Ripken made his major-league debut in 1981. They appreciate the historical significance of Ripken's career and the way his farewell tour brightened an otherwise dismal year.
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