Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLiners
IN THE NEWS

Liners

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | March 8, 1991
One of the nation's largest trash haulers broke ranks with the solidwaste industry yesterday to support environmental safeguards in rubble landfills."Many materials get into rubble fills that leach into the ground water as rain percolates through (the soil)," said Kenneth Wishnick, vice president of Browning-Ferris Industries Atlantic Region. "Let me put it this way, no one would want to stick a straw down to the bottom of a rubble landfill and drink the water."Wishnick was the only industry official to support a bill that would require liners beneath rubble fills.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - One true indicator of the seriousness of a baseball injury is how those in the dugout react when the potentially hurt player returns from the field. When Orioles' left-hander Zach Britton came into the visitors' dugout Wednesday night after taking a sharp liner off his right glove hand, Triple-A Norfolk manager Ron Johnson asked to see Britton's glove. "I heard it screaming," Johnson deadpanned while others laughed. So, yes, Britton, is fine - though he admits he was frightened for about 30 seconds after Minnesota Twins slugger Josh Willingham hit a scorching comebacker that deflected off Britton's glove and wrist.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By John Maxtone-Graham and John Maxtone-Graham,Universal Press Syndicate | September 8, 1991
"The Liner she's a lady," wrote Rudyard Kipling a century ago. In his day, passenger ships crossed oceans on line voyages, steaming from point A to point B; in consequence, they were called liners.Although few of today's liners still make crossings, they remain veritable stars of the busy cruising circuit and, as such, are well worth booking.Before the Wright Brothers put us all up in the air, liners served as inevitable and luxurious intercontinental transportation, crisscrossing Atlantic, Pacific and, indeed, every ocean in the world.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
The VitaClay Multicooker combines the taste of Old World clay pot cooking with the convenience of modern technology. Made from zisha clay, the appliance's liner retains and enhances the natural flavors of food. A microcomputer and thermostat allow for cooking ranging from a 30-minute boil to a 20-hour slow-cook and are self-adjusting, so your meal will always be done on time. The appliance also serves as a rice cooker. And the liner is dishwasher- and microwave-safe. Find the VitaClay Multicooker for $139.99 at vitaclaychef.com.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
The state announced long-awaited rules yesterday to keep toxic substances from leaking from coal-ash dumps. The regulations require liners and runoff collection systems at all new dump sites accepting coal ash. The purpose is to prevent harmful metals and chemicals from leaching into ground water or nearby streams. Dump operators must also take steps to prevent ash from being blown onto neighboring properties. The state Department of the Environment proposed regulating coal-ash dumps after it was discovered that toxic chemicals had contaminated the wells of 23 homes near two sand-and-gravel pits in Gambrills.
NEWS
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Contributing Writer | October 13, 1993
The Maryland Old Liners softball team took the gold medal for the fourth straight year during the Maryland Senior Olympics last week at Towson State University.The team is made up of men 65 and older from Howard, Montgomery and Baltimore counties.The first game of the double-elimination tournament was played in Glen Burnie last month. In the finals Friday, the Old Liners beat Pepco of Montgomery County, 21-10 and 9-1.The Maryland Senior Olympics were held Thursday through Saturday. More than 1,500 seniors participated in the track and field, team and individual events, including more than 60 from Howard.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 2004
TEHRAN, Iran - The hard-liners who won Iran's parliamentary elections in February have focused on women's rights in their efforts to reverse some of the reforms carried out under the moderate president, Mohammad Khatami. After the legislative session began in June, the 290-member Parliament, including all 12 of the women, abruptly rejected proposals to expand the inheritance right of Iranian women and to adopt the United Nations convention that bans discrimination against women. They also backed away from previous efforts to make "gender equality" a goal of the country's next four-year development plan.
NEWS
November 7, 1995
THE STATE IS in a quandary over environmental protection measures for rubble fills, which take the concrete, wood and other debris from construction and demolition projects. The Maryland Department of the Environment wants to require an impermeable plastic liner for these buried cells to block seepage of pollutants into underground water supplies.Yet the potential cost is so great -- from $100,000, $200,000 or more per acre -- that landfill operators and their customers are balking at MDE's proposed rules.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1996
An article in yesterday's Maryland section about disposal of construction debris incorrectly listed a landfill in Washington County among six that have no liners to prevent toxics from entering the ground water. The Washington County Rubble Landfill has a liner and a leachate collection system so that any toxics can be removed during water treatment.The Sun regrets the error.Acting on new evidence that construction rubble landfills in Maryland are polluting ground water, state environmental officials plan to require the facilities to install liners to protect neighboring drinking water wells.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Despite deep misgivings among administration hard-liners, President Bush decided yesterday to seek a multinational force for Iraq under a United Nations mandate and to call on the world body to play a major role in forming a new Iraqi government, a senior administration official said. Bush's decision is likely to bring about a significant change in Iraq, with American occupation authorities yielding some power to U.N. officials, and France, Germany and Russia, which had opposed the U.S.-led invasion, gaining influence over Iraq's future.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Sixty years ago this week, the world's attention was riveted on one man's dream as the liner United States, designed by William Francis Gibbs, steamed eastward across the Atlantic on its maiden voyage. Known as "The Big U," the liner sailed from New York's Ambrose Light to Bishop's Rock, off the English coast, the official Blue Riband course, in three days, 10 hours and 40 minutes, establishing a record that remains unbroken for a trans-Atlantic crossing. Gibbs, who was known during his lifetime as America's greatest naval designer, was consumed with the design and building of the United States, the fastest, most powerful and luxurious superliner ever built, which became his enduring legacy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
A century ago this April 15, Baltimoreans, like the rest of the world, awakened to the news that the great White Star Liner RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage to New York, had been in a collision late the night before, hitting an iceberg about 400 miles southeast of Newfoundland in frigid Atlantic waters. In a Sunday, April 14, dispatch from Cape Race, Newfoundland, The Baltimore Sun reported that at 10:25 p.m. (Baltimore time) the Titanic had struck an iceberg and had called for "immediate assistance.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Chris Jakubauskas will start Tuesday's game against the Oakland Athletics at Camden Yards, the first time he has started in the majors since April 2010, when he was carted off the field after getting hit in the head with a liner. This one is expected to go a little more smoothly. "Obviously, there's going to be a bunch made out of what I did in my last start in the big leagues, but I'm ready to go," said Jakubauskas, who is 0-0 with a 6.39 ERA in five relief appearances for the Orioles this year.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
The Orioles have shuffled their pitching staff, demoting one of their young starters to Triple-A while calling up a right-hander whose mere promotion is one of the better feel-good stories of the early season. Hit with a roster crunch created by short outings from two starters, another's illness and a weather-induced doubleheader, the Orioles demoted righty Brad Bergesen to Triple-A Norfolk on Saturday to bring up Chris Jakubauskas . Bergesen, who allowed four runs (two earned)
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Two weeks before lock down and lockout, negotiations on a new collective bargaining agreement for the NFL are non-existent. The owners and players are so entrenched in their respective positions that no negotiations are even planned. Who knew that dividing $9 billion in revenues from the most popular and prosperous professional sport in history would be this hard or this acrimonious? Certainly not Domonique Foxworth, the veteran Ravens cornerback who, as a member of the NFL Players Association's executive committee, has been sitting in on his first CBA talks.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
At the end of its seafaring days, the former S.S. France, which had been described as the "paradigm of elegance, style and speed" and had been transformed into the cruise ship Norway and finally the Blue Lady, was towed in 2006 to the Indian port of Alang, south of Mumbai. Here the tug dropped the great ship with the distinctive winged funnels in the shallows, where it waited with the other doomed liners for teams of scrappers to perform their ugly handiwork. "The imminent death of a beloved ship triggers regret, and Blue Lady-ex-Norway-ex-France proved no exception," writes John Maxtone-Graham in his recently published book, "France/Norway.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 24, 1996
Ozone City turns 200 next year, it should live so long.Yeltsin sacked his young hard-liners for a young hard-liner. That's reform for you.Uh-oh. Someone forgot to tell Westinghouse that network broadcasting is dead.Walter Amprey for Baltimore County School Soup!Pub Date: 6/24/96
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
T hey that go down to the sea in ships, that do business in great waters; These see the works of the Lord, and his wonders in the deep. - Psalm 107:23-30 The last time I spoke to Capt. Allen Baker, who lives in Roland Park, was to hear of his harrowing experiences riding out Hurricane Katrina aboard the tug Joan Moran, which was moored near the Industrial Canal in New Orleans. After my column appeared last Sunday on preservation battles swirling around the cruiser Olympia, Adm. George E. Dewey's flagship that triumphed over the Spanish naval squadron at Manila Bay in 1898, and the United States, the fabled trans-Atlantic liner, whose 1952 speed record for an ocean crossing remains unbroken, my phone began ringing and my e-mail basket went into meltdown with messages from ship buffs, maritime historians, preservationists and those who simply had memories they wanted to share.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
The problem: Trash cans in Southwest Baltimore have become a dumping site. The back story: A well-intentioned idea to keep city gateways clean quickly turned into a nuisance on South Gilmor Street at Wilkens Avenue. "What was designed to be a good thing didn't turn out to be," said Anne Ames, who wrote to Watchdog to get two metal trash cans removed from her New Southwest/Mount Clare community. The metal cans with plastic liners were installed along with two park benches in the Wilkens Avenue median.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.