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By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2005
It's a story accepted as gospel in Washington Redskins history. In the early 1930s, when the franchise still called Boston home, owner George Preston Marshall had to drop the moniker "Braves" after leaving the stadium he shared with the town's moribund Braves baseball franchise. So, seeking to honor his part-Sioux coach, William "Lone Star" Dietz, he re-christened his team the Redskins. Three years later, Marshall moved the club to Washington, and the rest is history. Or so the story went until last year, when California multicultural studies professor Linda Waggoner began sniffing around Dietz's biography.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - There's an old saying in horse racing that all men are equal on the turf and under it. Put another way, this sport confounds sheiks and scions of American dynasties who drop millions of dollars in futile efforts to breed a Kentucky Derby winner. Meanwhile, two neophytes can spend $10,000 to breed a horse for the first time and come within a whisker of the Triple Crown. That's California Chrome's story as he prepares to chase racing's signature achievement in Saturday's Belmont Stakes.
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SPORTS
October 2, 2006
The New York Yankees' Johnny Damon says Daniel Cabrera is "an ace for the future." Is he right? An ace for the future? Of course. But will he be that ace? Anyone can be that star of the future. People were ready to give up on Markakis when he was hitting .220. Ask me that same question at the end of next year. Robert E. Lescalleet Baltimore McDonald, Pennington, Coppinger, Ponson: They are part of a lineage of Orioles pitchers who morphed from flamethrowers to flameouts. Cabrera has unfathomable potential, but Mr. Angelos may have to add a hypnotist to the payroll.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 28, 2013
The 1970s corruption investigation known as Abscam, celebrated in "American Hustle," one of the holiday season's hottest movies, had its roots in Baltimore. It was in Charm City that the FBI tested the sting-style operation that marked Abscam as a particularly theatrical and effective form of undercover investigation. Baltimore FBI agents later trained those who carried out the Abscam sting. Abscam famously featured FBI agents posing as Arab sheiks, along with an accomplished con artist (played by Christian Bale in "American Hustle")
BUSINESS
By Graeme Browning | October 25, 1990
Times Mirror Co., the Los Angeles-based media and information company that owns The Baltimore Sun, reported yesterday that net income for the third quarter fell 40.3 percent, to $41.9 million from $70.1 million in the third quarter of 1989.Revenue for the third quarter rose 2.4 percent, to $895 million from $873.9 million in the comparable period of 1989.The company attributed the drop in earnings to declining advertising among the seven newspapers it owns, especially the Los Angeles Times, the flagship newspaper.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | June 23, 1993
NEW YORK -- There he was on early-morning television, the man who says he is Bill Clinton's half-brother. Asked to verify his lineage -- live on the air for the third time since dawn -- Henry Leon Ritzenthaler promptly fell asleep.Later, revived off-camera by coffee and a smoke, the aspiring first brother was able to pick up where he'd nodded off."I just want the president to know he has a brother, and if he chooses to ignore me that's fine," he said. "I don't know what'll come of this, but I don't want to put a black mark on him in any way."
NEWS
By Sherie Posesorski | February 10, 1991
FROM INK LAKE:CANADIAN STORIES.Selected by Michael Ondaatje.Viking.714 pages. $25.95. Some of the short stories by the 50 Canadian authors in "FroInk Lake" are favorites I grew up with, like Stephen Leacock's "L'envoi: the Train to Mariposa" and Morley Callaghan's "Ancient Lineage." Others are ones that I have grown to love, like Margaret Atwood's "The Man from Mars," Alice Munro's "Miles City, Montana."What is an unanticipated delight of this collection is that although most of the authors are well-known, editor Michael Ondaatje has made a concerted effort, as he states in the introduction, to seek out less familiar work by familiar authors and introduce up-and-coming authors to a new audience.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 2002
LONG BEFORE opening day at the county fair, the Hester family and their Hampshire and Duroc pigs were ready. A few weeks before, they traveled to the National Junior Swine Association Show in Kentucky, where their pigs placed in the top 10 and Jessica Hester's livestock judging garnered second place. "We were competing with big farms from as far away as Oklahoma and Iowa that have pigs with a 20-year lineage," said Jessica's twin sister, Emily, 20. "To make it to the top 10 as a small-town breeder with five-year lineage pigs is a big deal."
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | April 5, 1995
Oysterback, Maryland. -- Fresh dispatches from the Oysterback Bugeye:The ''Patamoke Peeper'' has been apprehended by Sheriff Wesley Briscoe. It turned out to be the town criminal, Alonzo Deaver, who was not peeping, as many have thought, but stealing shrubbery for resale to new homeowners at the Shallow Shore Doublewide Park. That's Alonzo's story and he says he's sticking to it. . . .Paisley Redmond is back at home with wife Beth and son Olivier after his return from an unexpected trip to New York in the back of the Patamoke Seafood Truck along with a quarter ton of Cap'n Fike's Flash Frozen Breaded Clam Strips.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | February 7, 1991
In the midst of an industrywide downturn in newspaper profits, Times Mirror Co., owner of The Sun and The Evening Sun, reported yesterday a sharp drop in fourth-quarter earnings last year and warned of further problems in the current period.The Los Angeles-based company said profits fell more than 38 percent in the final three months, to $45.6 million, or 35 cents a share, from $74.1 million, or 57 cents a share, a year earlier. Revenue changed little, increasing slightly more than 2 percent, to $956 million.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
Athletes have long known about the benefits of running in sand. But running in thick, black muck? While chasing rabbits as they dart and weave? That's a south-central Florida thing - specifically in the towns of Belle Glade and Pahokee, where for years football players have trained by scurrying after the animals through sugarcane fields. It's an experience that binds together the many Division I stars who grew up near Lake Okeechobee, in Everglades country - an area many of them simply call "The Muck.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Richard K.C. Hsieh, a public health specialist and former National Library of Medicine official who in retirement traced his family tree back to seventh-century China, died of a heart attack Dec. 31 at his Towson home. He was 79. Born in 1932 in Tianjin, China, not far from Beijing, Richard Hsieh (pronounced Shay) moved with his family to Taiwan after World War II, according to his wife of 51 years, the former Rebecca Tung. He came to the United States in 1953 from Hong Kong to enroll at the Johns Hopkins University, where his father had done graduate studies in the 1920s.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,edward.lee@baltsun.com | August 19, 2009
Two days after he was waived by the New York Jets almost a year ago, Bryan Mattison found a new home with the Ravens. And as ecstatic as he was to continue his NFL career, a small part of Mattison was reluctant to make the move - and it had nothing to do with AFC rivalries. Bryan Mattison is the son of Greg Mattison, then the Ravens linebackers coach and now the defensive coordinator. That relationship gave Bryan Mattison pause. "It was great, but then you think to yourself - not ever questioning whether you're going to do it or not - 'Now I'm going to have to deal with this and deal with that,' " Mattison, 25, recalled.
SPORTS
October 2, 2006
The New York Yankees' Johnny Damon says Daniel Cabrera is "an ace for the future." Is he right? An ace for the future? Of course. But will he be that ace? Anyone can be that star of the future. People were ready to give up on Markakis when he was hitting .220. Ask me that same question at the end of next year. Robert E. Lescalleet Baltimore McDonald, Pennington, Coppinger, Ponson: They are part of a lineage of Orioles pitchers who morphed from flamethrowers to flameouts. Cabrera has unfathomable potential, but Mr. Angelos may have to add a hypnotist to the payroll.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Boxing's fractured heavyweight division has four champions. They are the World Boxing Council's Hasim Rahman, the International Boxing Federation's Chris Byrd, the World Boxing Association's Nikolay Valuev and the World Boxing Organization's Lamon Brewster. Of these, Rahman's belt is considered the most accepted - although not necessarily because he is considered to be the best of the lot. The WBC belt held by Rahman has a lineage that can be traced back through such champions as Lennox Lewis, Larry Holmes, Joe Frazier, Muhammad Ali, Rocky Marciano, Joe Louis -- all the way back to John L. Sullivan in the late 19th century.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2006
For most of his life, William Popomaronis wondered about his blue eyes and blond hair. Born in Baltimore to natives of Greece, Popomaronis stood out in a sea of dark hair, dark eyes and olive skin at family gatherings. It was obvious that the 52-year-old pharmacist and one of his daughters picked up their coloring from his mother and maternal grandfather, who were also blondes, but no one else in the family had similar features. "I could only infer that somewhere, long ago in my family history, someone did not originate from Greece," Popomaronis says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,Special to the Sun | April 11, 2004
Blue Blood, by Edward Conlon. Riverhead Books. 512 Pages. $26.95 Every cop has a story to tell, and many officers dream of writing books about "the Job," as their work is sometimes known. One officer I met in Baltimore clips every newspaper story about the department and glues them neatly into a scrapbook, right next to his own notes. One day, he says, he will write a memoir. Fortunately, few officers publish autobiographies. Most have trouble writing and spelling -- I have seen the evidence contained in hundreds of police reports and court documents loaded with poor grammar and nonsensical sentences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria Brownworth and Victoria Brownworth,Special to the Sun | April 23, 2000
An abundance of big, provocative novels has burst forth this spring and while one could save them for summer doldrums, this critic advises: Don't wait. It's difficult to conceive "In the Fall"(Atlantic Monthly Press, 560 pages, $25) as a first novel -- the saga's complexity and the faultless grace of Jeffrey Lent's language bespeak a seasoned writer. From mysterious prologue to searing ending, this epic tale of interracial relationships spanning Civil War through Depression startles, engages and compels.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2005
It's a story accepted as gospel in Washington Redskins history. In the early 1930s, when the franchise still called Boston home, owner George Preston Marshall had to drop the moniker "Braves" after leaving the stadium he shared with the town's moribund Braves baseball franchise. So, seeking to honor his part-Sioux coach, William "Lone Star" Dietz, he re-christened his team the Redskins. Three years later, Marshall moved the club to Washington, and the rest is history. Or so the story went until last year, when California multicultural studies professor Linda Waggoner began sniffing around Dietz's biography.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,Special to the Sun | April 11, 2004
Blue Blood, by Edward Conlon. Riverhead Books. 512 Pages. $26.95 Every cop has a story to tell, and many officers dream of writing books about "the Job," as their work is sometimes known. One officer I met in Baltimore clips every newspaper story about the department and glues them neatly into a scrapbook, right next to his own notes. One day, he says, he will write a memoir. Fortunately, few officers publish autobiographies. Most have trouble writing and spelling -- I have seen the evidence contained in hundreds of police reports and court documents loaded with poor grammar and nonsensical sentences.
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