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Line Of Duty

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NEWS
September 19, 1995
IT HAS to be on their minds any time firefighters head to their trucks to answer an alarm. There's always the possibility of serious injury or death. Of course, they have to put such thoughts away in order to do their job right. To dwell on anything other than the task at hand is asking for trouble. You must concentrate on the fire.That's what Eric D. Schaefer was doing Saturday night. Only a fireman 18 months, he was trying his best to remember and use all the lessons he had learned from more experienced colleagues.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
When city school police officer Joseph Baribeault attempted to arrest two combative students at the old Greenspring Middle School, he ended up injured at the bottom of two flights of concrete stairs. Even though the city has acknowledged his disabilities from the incident, he has been left without pay and benefits for being injured in the line of duty - all because members of the School Police Force are classified as civilians in Baltimore's pension system "In July, I got a life-saving award, and months later, I'm on food stamps," said Baribeault, 36, who retired this year because of his injuries after seven years on the force.
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NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | February 13, 2000
AN ELDERSBURG man is shot to death by criminals. The valorous act that led to the victim's murder is widely, deservedly praised. And after the flush of public indignation and sorrow come the questions about the future for the deceased and especially for his family. Police Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero's fatal tale involves three communities: Pikesville, where he was gunned down by escaping jewel robbers Monday; Baltimore County, where he was a decorated officer with 12 years service; and Carroll County, where his wife and the couple's five small children grieve in ways that few of us can truly comprehend.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Gene Cassidy thought he was lucky to survive being shot in the head twice 25 years ago when he was a Baltimore policeman, so a second near-death ordeal recently seemed unreal. Just 27 years old, Cassidy lost his sight after a man he was trying to arrest on an assault warrant fired at him. The shooting, and his survival, made Cassidy a legend in Baltimore police ranks and became fodder for "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets," the book by David Simon, and later a TV series, about crime in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2000
Anne Arundel County Fire Chief Roger C. Simonds Sr. said yesterday that he hopes the county will have no other fallen heroes as he dedicated a memorial for firefighters who have died in the line of duty. "It was important that we remember those who have given their lives. But I hope we never have to put another name in there," said Simonds, standing in front of a glass and wood display case honoring 18 county firefighters. The memorial at the entrance of county fire headquarters in Millersville contains information about each of the fallen firefighters dating to 1910, when the first Annapolis volunteer firefighter was killed.
NEWS
By La Quinta Dixon and La Quinta Dixon,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
More than 21 years ago, Baltimore police Sgt. Robert J. Barlow collapsed and died from a massive heart attack shortly after leaving work. This fall, he might join the ranks of 101 city officers officially declared "killed in the line of duty."Barlow and at least three others have been identified as candidates for having their names inscribed on a $3.5 million memorial to be built at Shot Tower Park, near downtown police headquarters.The names surfaced after the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police announced a fund-raising campaign for the memorial last month.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2000
ARUNDEL HIGH School's Indoor Color Guard has dedicated this year's performances to police and criminal justice officers who have fallen in the line of duty, with the message of its show "In valor there is hope." During the past few months, the group has performed in competitions throughout Maryland and Pennsylvania, which culminated in the Keystone Indoor Drill Association Championships, held Saturday in Hanover, Pa. The team dedicated its performance to Baltimore County police Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero, killed Feb. 7 as he chased robbers fleeing a Pikesville jewelry store holdup.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2001
Two black police officers killed in the line of duty last year were honored yesterday by state and Baltimore officials during a ceremony that celebrated the accomplishments of African-Americans in law enforcement. About 250 people attended the ceremony at Maryland State Police headquarters in Pikesville that focused on state police Cpl. Edward M. Toatley and Baltimore Officer Kevon M. Gavin. "They didn't die in vain," said Baltimore Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris. Toatley was fatally shot in October during an undercover drug sting in Washington.
NEWS
October 8, 2001
ROBERT W. Humphrey wasn't paid to fight fires and rescue those in danger. But he did so for 27 years as a volunteer firefighter with the Maryland Line fire company in northern Baltimore County. His death a year ago came in the line of duty, when he was struck by a motorist as he attempted to rescue a woman trapped in an overturned car on Interstate 83. The Parkton man was among the 102 fallen firefighters honored Oct. 7 in memorial ceremonies at the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
The Anne Arundel County firefighters who died in the line duty were listed on a plaque the size of a cereal box, hanging on a concrete block wall at county fire headquarters. A bowling trophy seemed detailed and elaborate in comparison. "Just a name and a date, and that was all the documentation we had," said Tim Runkles, a nine-year firefighter assigned to the county fire marshal's office. His curiosity about the fallen firefighters inspired him to launch a three-year research project that led him from graveyards to widows' hospital beds for more information.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2010
The police officers who make up the Maryland Law hockey team play weekend games against fellow officers, military groups or firefighters. This Saturday, the last game of the season, they take to the ice against retired professional players. In a game organized as a benefit for a fellow officer who was sidelined from the Baltimore County force as a result of line-of-duty injury, Maryland Law will face off against the Washington Capitals Alumni, retirees who can still skate a good game.
NEWS
By By Peter Hermann peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 21, 2010
R obert Wayne Peregoy, 47, died after suffering a heart attack while driving to work on I-795 in Owings Mills. Michael Patrick Howe died in a hospital room after suffering a stroke in his Carroll County home. Both men were police officers, and the departments for each ruled that their deaths occurred in the line of duty - Peregoy was heading to court; Howe collapsed after commanding officers to storm a house after a man had killed his wife and then himself. Both men received funerals with police honors and pageantry.
NEWS
May 6, 2009
MDE looking into Homeland fish kill 3 State environmental officials are investigating what might have killed more than 200 fish in a lake in Homeland, a spokeswoman said yesterday. Residents of the North Baltimore neighborhood reported seeing dead fish last week in one of three lakes on Springlake Way. The fish appeared to have died from lack of oxygen in the water, said Dawn Stoltzfus, spokeswoman with the state Department of the Environment. "We've never had this problem before," said Lynn L. Petersons, operations manager for the Homeland Association, which maintains common areas in the neighborhood.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
BGE seeks cause of electrical fire About 175 senior and disabled residents of a Towson apartment complex remained displaced yesterday as utility crews worked to repair an underground electrical cable. Burning underground wires forced the residents of the Virginia Towers complex to evacuate Sunday. A similar problem prompted an evacuation of the 15-story building in August. "We're searching for the root cause," said Linda Foy, a spokeswoman for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. She said service would probably be restored by this afternoon.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | April 11, 2008
The last bell rang for Racheal M. Wilson, the city fire department recruit who died during a poorly executed training exercise. When it sounded yesterday during a ceremony outside a firehouse in Northeast Baltimore, Wilson's little girl, an 8-year-old named Princess, covered her face. And Wilson's fiance, dressed in black, stood with his hand on his daughter's shoulders. "It is just like it was yesterday," said Priscilla Neal, Wilson's mother, as she wiped away tears. "I miss her. I mean, I really miss her."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2007
If a book can raise a lump in your throat, then Some Gave All: A History of Baltimore Police Officers Killed in the Line of Duty 1808-2007, by Steven P. Olson and Robert P. Brown, will certainly do so. Since 1784, when a force of constables was established to enforce the town's laws (the department itself was officially established in 1845), 124 Baltimore officers have died in the line of duty. The authors offer another chilling statistic. Since 1792, 17,900 federal, state and local law enforcement officers have been killed; during the last decade, an average of one is killed every 53 hours.
NEWS
May 9, 1997
LT. OWEN E. SWEENEY, 47, was doing paperwork Wednesday, when he heard an emergency call. He decided his place was on the scene. While trying to pacify a mental patient, a shotgun blast killed the 28-year police veteran.In some ways, the Northeast Baltimore confrontation was an eerie reminder of an incident that took place in Homeland 16 months ago. A mentally ill woman, distraught and armed with a kitchen knife, was killed after she lunged at officers. Advocates of the mentally ill attacked police behavior, saying that despite her knife, the more numerous officers should have been able to overpower her or defuse the crisis with the aid of psychiatrists.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
Baltimore County police and elected officials unveiled yesterday the fifth name on the Towson memorial that pays tribute to officers who have died in the line of duty. The name was that of Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero, 35, who was killed in February. It joins the four others on the Police Memorial -- a blue granite replica of a police badge that stands in front of the county Circuit Court building. The unveiling was held during a 40-minute ceremony that included speeches, prayers and the laying of wreaths.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2007
A bill in the City Council that would name a firehouse after a veteran firefighter killed in the line of duty last year could receive a vote at tonight's council meeting - more than nine months after it was introduced. City Councilman Nicholas C. D'Adamo Jr. said he will attempt a rare procedural move to force the legislation out of committee - where it has languished since January - and move it toward final passage. The legislation would name the fire station at 4315 Mannasota Ave. after Allan M. Roberts, a 19-year veteran who was killed after he entered a burning Greektown rowhouse last October with two other firefighters.
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