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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2001
The Maryland Racing Commission gave preliminary approval yesterday to a bid by William Rickman Jr. to build a horse track in Western Maryland, acting after the Maryland Jockey Club agreed to drop its opposition. Rickman, owner of Delaware Park and Ocean Downs, presented the commission with a $20 million line of credit for Allegany Racing Association, the entity composed of Rickman and his father, William Rickman, that proposes to construct the track in eastern Allegany County. Representatives of the Maryland Jockey Club stopped fighting the proposal after Rickman secured the line of credit from the Wilmington Trust Co. in Delaware.
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BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2000
One-hundred-seven days after it filed for bankruptcy reorganization, troubled Creditrust Corp. said that it has agreed to merge the company into a subsidiary of NCO Group Inc., one of the world's largest bill collectors. Under the deal announced late Thursday, Creditrust, which collects and manages delinquent Visa and MasterCard accounts, will merge into NCO Portfolio Management Inc., a newly formed company that is in the same business. Creditrust shareholders will receive $17 million to $20 million in stock, which would represent a 40 percent to 45 percent ownership stake in the new, publicly traded company.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
Royal Ahold NV pledged Giant Food Inc. and several other U.S. and Dutch grocery store chains as collateral to secure a critical line of credit from bankers, who remain skeptical of the company's finances in the wake of a $500 million accounting scandal at its Columbia-based U.S. Foodservice unit. In addition to Landover-based Giant, terms of the $2.91 billion credit agreement give the banks liens on two other Ahold grocery chains in the United States: Stop & Shop Supermarket Co. in Quincy, Mass.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
Linemen usually garner little recognition. Centennial's Wyatt Cooper is an exception. As the Eagles (3-1 overall, 3-0 league), who are tied for first place with Oakland Mills and Wilde Lake, continue to play beyond expectations, Cooper is a major reason why. The 6-foot-2, 225-pound senior offensive guard and defensive tackle played his most significant game on Sept. 29 in a 28-21 upset of previously unbeaten Long Reach, a team that had outscored Centennial, 86-2, over the past three seasons.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Ian Duncan and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
In the black market of Maryland's prisons and jails, where the right price can secure cellphones and drugs, transactions unfold through a complex system of currency. Among the key elements: 14-digit codes, prepaid debit cards and text messages. One brand of cards - Green Dot - is so ubiquitous that it has become part of the lexicon on the inside. The recent federal indictment of two dozen inmates and corrections officers in an alleged Black Guerrilla Family corruption scandal at the Baltimore City Detention Center notes several instances in which suspects refer to "dots" in transactions.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Severna Park company Dynasplint Systems Inc. laid off 500 employees, including about 250 in Maryland, on Tuesday after its lender moved to foreclose on its property, including cash that was to cover payroll. In a letter to laid-off employees obtained by The Baltimore Sun, company President George Hepburn wrote that a local bank put about $1 million that the company had deposited since Aug. 1 toward a $9 million line of credit owed, instead of employee paychecks. Hepburn said he had to cut the company's work force by 70 percent as a result.
TRAVEL
By Marion Winik and Marion Winik,Special to the Sun | July 18, 2004
When a telemarketer offers me a free vacation in Orlando or Las Vegas, I can't help but feel intrigued. I stare at the prize code I've scribbled down, and I wonder. It has to be a scam, right? Recently, I decided to find out. When I got a call asking if I'd like to visit a resort in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley, I said indeed I would. Since it's my husband's favorite place in the world, I figured I'd have no trouble getting him on board. A few days later, I received a letter offering me a four-day vacation at Massanutten Resort plus either 72 holes of golf or four ski passes for "less than $75 per person, double occupancy."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Several Baltimore-area homeowners are suing the largest residential real estate team in the state, alleging a "scheme of fraud and misrepresentations" involving home purchases, sales and financing. The suit, a proposed class action, names the Creig Northrop Team, Long & Foster and several mortgage firms — including Long & Foster's Prosperity Mortgage Co. — as defendants. A similar lawsuit brought against the Northrop team by a Howard County couple was settled in March.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 31, 1992
Bethlehem Steel Corp. said yesterday that it had signed an agreement that provides it with $500 million in revolving credit. The new line of credit replaces two others.The credit line is with a group of 19 U.S. and international banks, including Maryland National Bank and First National Bank of Maryland, according to Bethlehem spokesman Art Roth. Bethlehem did not specify the commitment of each bank.Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. is the agent for the line of credit, with Chemical Bank and Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan Ltd., as co-lead managers.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 8, 2013
As the government shutdown continues, credit unions whose members are federal workers offering low-rate loans and other assistance. Here is just a sampling, but check out your credit union if you need money to tied you offer while your paycheck is delayed because of politics: The National Institutes of Health FCU for instance is offering a 0% introductory rate for the first 60 days on a line of credit of up to $10,000. The rate goes up for the next 12 months, from 1.99% to 4.99 percent.
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