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NEWS
By The Washington Post | April 29, 2009
FRANKIE MANNING, 94 A pioneer of the Lindy Hop Frankie "Musclehead" Manning, a Harlem dancer and Tony Award-winning choreographer widely celebrated as one of the pioneers of the Lindy Hop, an acrobatic swing dance style of the 1930s and 1940s, died Monday in New York City. His nickname developed from the chants of dancers, "Go, Musclehead, go!" watching Mr. Manning's closely cropped head glisten with sweat as he kicked and spun himself, and his partners, into human propellers. The dance reportedly owed its name to transAtlantic aviator Charles Lindbergh, when one Savoy dancer told an inquiring reporter, "We flyin' like Lindy!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
It's semifinals week on “Dancing with the Stars,” and Jacoby Jones and Karina Smirnoff had two dances this week: Argentine Tango and Lindy Hop (chosen by Twitter users). First up was the Argentine Tango. Karina and Jacoby are losing their patience with each other in rehearsal this week. During rehearsal on the ballroom stage for camera blocking, Karina had a flip over Jacoby that ended with her landing on her jaw, and it sounds like she might have had a slight concussion. She goes to the hospital, but we don't follow her there.
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FEATURES
By Pat van den Beemt | November 25, 1990
The joint was jumpin' on a recent Saturday night as 200 people twirled, spun, jitterbugged and did the Lindy hop at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Baltimore.The dancers, who switched partners as often as the band changed big band tunes, were breathless and exhilarated.Swing dancing is back and drawing in people too young to remember the dances' beginnings."There's a lot of theories, but I think swing dancing is popular now because there's been a cultural revolution," says Leslie Coombs, founder of Swing Baltimore, a group that holds dances the second Saturday of each month.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
For more than 22 years, Friday Night Swing Club has welcomed thousands of dancers 16 and older of every ability to tango, cha-cha, foxtrot, jitterbug, salsa, waltz, hustle and others, from 9 p.m. to midnight Friday nights. The club started at the ROTC building at Johns Hopkins University, then moved to the Boomi Temple on Charles Street until that property was sold to Loyola University Maryland. Through the years, the club's home has been the Scottish Rite Temple in Tuscany-Canterbury, Tall Cedars Club and the Towson Armory.
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 29, 1999
The music and dancing of the pre-rock era are back in full swing! That's right, swing is in, with the Brian Setzer Orchestra, The W's and Squirrel Nut Zippers reviving a sound that was hot in the 1940s and '50s.At last month's Grammy Awards, two of Setzer's songs won awards ("Jump, Jive an 'Wail" captured Best Bop Performance by a Duo or Group, and "Sleepwalk" won Best Pop Instrumental). Clubs in Los Angeles and San Francisco began featuring swing in the late 1980s. The 1996 movie "Swingers" also helped fuel the comeback.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
It's semifinals week on “Dancing with the Stars,” and Jacoby Jones and Karina Smirnoff had two dances this week: Argentine Tango and Lindy Hop (chosen by Twitter users). First up was the Argentine Tango. Karina and Jacoby are losing their patience with each other in rehearsal this week. During rehearsal on the ballroom stage for camera blocking, Karina had a flip over Jacoby that ended with her landing on her jaw, and it sounds like she might have had a slight concussion. She goes to the hospital, but we don't follow her there.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
For more than 22 years, Friday Night Swing Club has welcomed thousands of dancers 16 and older of every ability to tango, cha-cha, foxtrot, jitterbug, salsa, waltz, hustle and others, from 9 p.m. to midnight Friday nights. The club started at the ROTC building at Johns Hopkins University, then moved to the Boomi Temple on Charles Street until that property was sold to Loyola University Maryland. Through the years, the club's home has been the Scottish Rite Temple in Tuscany-Canterbury, Tall Cedars Club and the Towson Armory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
If Chaz Bono and Bristol Palin can dance - well then, so can you. Maybe not like a pro, maybe not well enough to make a living at it - it's a rare gift to be able to moonwalk like Michael Jackson or to twirl and shimmy like Stacy Keibler. But dancing is supposed to be fun, not something only the elite can do. Everybody does it, whether at a high school mixer, a cousin's wedding reception or a high-class society ball. Becoming a really good dancer takes serious resolve and tons of hard work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 4, 1999
Camden Yards was swinging even before baseball season, thanks to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's Spring Swing.Close to 400 partygoers packed the stadium's sixth-floor lounge to browse the buffet and hone their lindy hop on the dance floor.Among the hep cats hanging around: Kendel and Robert Ehrlich Jr., event co-chairs; Josie Schaeffer, executive director of Cystic Fibrosis, Maryland chapter; Suzanne and Bruce Hoffman (he's chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority); Dr. Craig Smith, CEO of Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc.; Dr. Beryl Rosenstein and Dr. Pamela Zeitlin, co-directors of the Cystic Fibrosis Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital; Wanda Draper, WBAL-TV's director of public affairs; Dr. Robert Draper, orthopedic surgeon at St. Joseph Medical Center; and Gengy Vaikness, Pam Shriver's event director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 28, 1999
Roadsters and rhythm were highlights of the recent Alzheimer's Association's "Cruisin' Down Memory Lane" gala.The 175 guests first got an eyeful of classic cars parked outside Ravens Stadium, then an earful of vintage tunes inside the North Club Level Lounge.It didn't take long for the Mood Swings dance band to get into full swing for Lindy-Hop pros like John Sargent and Samanta Papa-Sargent.Among those having a ball were event co-chairs Michael and Lois Hodes; Charles Borek, president of the Alzheimer's Association, Central Maryland; Micki Pellington and John Barnes, board members; Sharon and Doug Strouse, president of American Legal Reporting Inc.; Janice Dent, training director for VIPS Inc.; Betty Shelton and Gloria Muldrow, co-leaders of the Enon Baptist Church Alzheimer's group; Maybian and Dr. Michael Gloth, chief of geriatrics at Union Memorial Hospital; and Dr. John Breitner, chairman of Johns Hopkins University's department of mental hygiene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
If Chaz Bono and Bristol Palin can dance - well then, so can you. Maybe not like a pro, maybe not well enough to make a living at it - it's a rare gift to be able to moonwalk like Michael Jackson or to twirl and shimmy like Stacy Keibler. But dancing is supposed to be fun, not something only the elite can do. Everybody does it, whether at a high school mixer, a cousin's wedding reception or a high-class society ball. Becoming a really good dancer takes serious resolve and tons of hard work.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | April 29, 2009
FRANKIE MANNING, 94 A pioneer of the Lindy Hop Frankie "Musclehead" Manning, a Harlem dancer and Tony Award-winning choreographer widely celebrated as one of the pioneers of the Lindy Hop, an acrobatic swing dance style of the 1930s and 1940s, died Monday in New York City. His nickname developed from the chants of dancers, "Go, Musclehead, go!" watching Mr. Manning's closely cropped head glisten with sweat as he kicked and spun himself, and his partners, into human propellers. The dance reportedly owed its name to transAtlantic aviator Charles Lindbergh, when one Savoy dancer told an inquiring reporter, "We flyin' like Lindy!"
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 29, 1999
The music and dancing of the pre-rock era are back in full swing! That's right, swing is in, with the Brian Setzer Orchestra, The W's and Squirrel Nut Zippers reviving a sound that was hot in the 1940s and '50s.At last month's Grammy Awards, two of Setzer's songs won awards ("Jump, Jive an 'Wail" captured Best Bop Performance by a Duo or Group, and "Sleepwalk" won Best Pop Instrumental). Clubs in Los Angeles and San Francisco began featuring swing in the late 1980s. The 1996 movie "Swingers" also helped fuel the comeback.
FEATURES
By Pat van den Beemt | November 25, 1990
The joint was jumpin' on a recent Saturday night as 200 people twirled, spun, jitterbugged and did the Lindy hop at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Baltimore.The dancers, who switched partners as often as the band changed big band tunes, were breathless and exhilarated.Swing dancing is back and drawing in people too young to remember the dances' beginnings."There's a lot of theories, but I think swing dancing is popular now because there's been a cultural revolution," says Leslie Coombs, founder of Swing Baltimore, a group that holds dances the second Saturday of each month.
NEWS
By Monica Lopossay and Monica Lopossay,Sun Photographer | March 16, 2008
It wasn't the terrible lighting or students hiding their faces for fear of being caught freak-dancing on camera that made getting this photograph so tough. The kids loved having their photo taken while bent at a 45-degree angle, dipping and grinding to the sounds of rapper 50 Cent. The principal was the one on edge. Well, it was Saturday night at a high school dance. I understand his position. He is there to protect the integrity of the school and its students. But I was there to get the reality of the situation, be it lindy hop or the popular, sexually charged freak dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 11, 2001
Before you head over to the Mechanic Theatre to catch the Broadway revue "Swing!" this week, you might want to know the difference between a knothole and a doghouse. And if you think the first has to do with wood and the second with canines, you're definitely not in the swing of things. Both terms are part of the lingo of swing, a hip vocabulary popularized by the likes of Baltimore native Cab Calloway. (A "knothole," by the way, is a doughnut; a "doghouse" is a bass fiddle.) Although some of this jive talk may be passe, other terms have become part of the common parlance.
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