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By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 11, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Twenty years ago, a young military lawyer defending an Air Force pilot on a drug charge landed himself on 60 Minutes, exposing widespread flaws in the Air Force drug-testing system that led to an overhaul of the program. Today, the same country lawyer with the soft Southern drawl and sharp wit is again making national headlines by raising provocative questions about a major military scandal. But now, Lindsey Graham is a U.S. senator from South Carolina, and he wants answers about a far more explosive case, the abuse of Iraqi detainees by U.S. soldiers at the Abu Ghraib prison near Baghdad.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | March 12, 2013
President Barack Obama had a dinner date last week with a dozen of his worst enemies, thus proving that the governmental stalemate in Washington, D.C., is driving him to unusual acts of political creativity -- or desperation. The president personally picked up the tab for the private dinner at the Jefferson Hotel, and the guests were all Republican senators, including John McCain (Ariz.), Lindsey Graham (S.C.), Tom Coburn (Okla.), Bob Corker (Tenn.), Kelly Ayotte (N.H.), Dan Coats (Ind.)
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NEWS
September 1, 2004
Sen. Zell Miller, Democrat Georgia "I never dreamed that the (Democratic) party was as far left as it is until I went to Washington." Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa "There's a very distinct difference between the two candidates and somebody needs to express it, and I wish the president could express it more." Filmmaker Michael Moore "I now know what th Christians probably felt like walking into the Coliseum." Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina "The winning combination is Republicans who can sell conservative philosophy to a wider audience, showing acceptance to moderates."
NEWS
March 7, 2010
ABC's This Week Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius; Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. 9 a.m.: WMDT (Channel 47) 10 a.m.: WJLA (Channel 7) 10:30 a.m.: WMAR (Channel 2) CBS' Face the Nation Sens. Evan Bayh, D-Ind., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. 10:30 a.m.: WUSA (Channel 9) and WJZ (Channel 13) NBC's Meet the Press Sebelius; Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. 10 a.m.: WGAL (Channel 8), WBAL (Channel 11)
NEWS
March 7, 2010
ABC's This Week Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius; Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. 9 a.m.: WMDT (Channel 47) 10 a.m.: WJLA (Channel 7) 10:30 a.m.: WMAR (Channel 2) CBS' Face the Nation Sens. Evan Bayh, D-Ind., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. 10:30 a.m.: WUSA (Channel 9) and WJZ (Channel 13) NBC's Meet the Press Sebelius; Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. 10 a.m.: WGAL (Channel 8), WBAL (Channel 11)
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Their interest and their influence fading, Christian conservatives are struggling to regain the power that not long ago helped Republicans elect a president and win control of Congress. Since Bill Clinton left the scene, Christians have retreated from elective politics, no longer stirred to anger by a president they abhorred, and frustrated by their inability to enact laws barring abortion and permitting school prayer. In 2000, about 4 million Christian conservative voters sat out the election.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and Richard Simon and David G. Savage and Richard Simon,Tribune Newspapers | July 29, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The near-party line vote Tuesday to approve Judge Sonia Sotomayor in the Senate Judiciary Committee sent a message that Supreme Court nominees cannot be assured of winning support in the Senate even if they have solid legal credentials and a moderate record. It also sent a warning that a more liberal nominee from President Barack Obama could provoke an all-out confirmation battle in the Senate. By a 13-6 vote, the Democrats and a lone Republican sent her nomination to the full Senate, where she is expected to win confirmation next week.
NEWS
April 6, 2006
Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez was in Beijing last week warning that America could return to economic isolationism. Our question is, who is threatening whom? Protectionism remains a disastrous course for the world's dominant economy. Even Sens. Charles E. Schumer (a Democrat) and Lindsey Graham (a Republican) must know that. They're sponsoring legislation to slap a retaliatory tariff of 27.5 percent on all Chinese goods if Beijing doesn't allow its undervalued currency to appreciate.
NEWS
By NICOLE GAOUETTE and NICOLE GAOUETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- After days of emotional, sometimes stinging debate on immigration policy, it appears all but certain that the Senate will pass a bill next week with the kind of broad changes backed by President Bush. The final fate of the legislation might not be determined for months, but the Senate's progress in its debate has heartened those who favor a sweeping approach to rewriting immigration laws. The key to the likely passage of the Senate bill has been a bipartisan alliance that has thwarted efforts to limit or kill the legislation's guest worker measure and its legalization provisions for undocumented immigrants.
NEWS
By David Horsey | March 12, 2013
President Barack Obama had a dinner date last week with a dozen of his worst enemies, thus proving that the governmental stalemate in Washington, D.C., is driving him to unusual acts of political creativity -- or desperation. The president personally picked up the tab for the private dinner at the Jefferson Hotel, and the guests were all Republican senators, including John McCain (Ariz.), Lindsey Graham (S.C.), Tom Coburn (Okla.), Bob Corker (Tenn.), Kelly Ayotte (N.H.), Dan Coats (Ind.)
NEWS
By David G. Savage and Richard Simon and David G. Savage and Richard Simon,Tribune Newspapers | July 29, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The near-party line vote Tuesday to approve Judge Sonia Sotomayor in the Senate Judiciary Committee sent a message that Supreme Court nominees cannot be assured of winning support in the Senate even if they have solid legal credentials and a moderate record. It also sent a warning that a more liberal nominee from President Barack Obama could provoke an all-out confirmation battle in the Senate. By a 13-6 vote, the Democrats and a lone Republican sent her nomination to the full Senate, where she is expected to win confirmation next week.
NEWS
By NICOLE GAOUETTE and NICOLE GAOUETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- After days of emotional, sometimes stinging debate on immigration policy, it appears all but certain that the Senate will pass a bill next week with the kind of broad changes backed by President Bush. The final fate of the legislation might not be determined for months, but the Senate's progress in its debate has heartened those who favor a sweeping approach to rewriting immigration laws. The key to the likely passage of the Senate bill has been a bipartisan alliance that has thwarted efforts to limit or kill the legislation's guest worker measure and its legalization provisions for undocumented immigrants.
NEWS
April 6, 2006
Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez was in Beijing last week warning that America could return to economic isolationism. Our question is, who is threatening whom? Protectionism remains a disastrous course for the world's dominant economy. Even Sens. Charles E. Schumer (a Democrat) and Lindsey Graham (a Republican) must know that. They're sponsoring legislation to slap a retaliatory tariff of 27.5 percent on all Chinese goods if Beijing doesn't allow its undervalued currency to appreciate.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - Under intense pressure at his nationally televised Senate hearing yesterday, Judge John G. Roberts Jr. never lost his cool and never gave an inch. He was soft-spoken, even-tempered and smoothly evasive through a long day of questioning. Politely but resolutely, he refused to let senators bait him into offering his views on emotional legal issues while avoiding mistakes that might have impeded his smooth sail to confirmation as chief justice. President Bush's first Supreme Court nominee presented himself as a moderate conservative, an old-fashioned judge who believes cases should be decided from bottom-up facts, rather than from an overarching, top-down ideology.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
Sen. Zell Miller, Democrat Georgia "I never dreamed that the (Democratic) party was as far left as it is until I went to Washington." Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa "There's a very distinct difference between the two candidates and somebody needs to express it, and I wish the president could express it more." Filmmaker Michael Moore "I now know what th Christians probably felt like walking into the Coliseum." Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina "The winning combination is Republicans who can sell conservative philosophy to a wider audience, showing acceptance to moderates."
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 11, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Twenty years ago, a young military lawyer defending an Air Force pilot on a drug charge landed himself on 60 Minutes, exposing widespread flaws in the Air Force drug-testing system that led to an overhaul of the program. Today, the same country lawyer with the soft Southern drawl and sharp wit is again making national headlines by raising provocative questions about a major military scandal. But now, Lindsey Graham is a U.S. senator from South Carolina, and he wants answers about a far more explosive case, the abuse of Iraqi detainees by U.S. soldiers at the Abu Ghraib prison near Baghdad.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - Under intense pressure at his nationally televised Senate hearing yesterday, Judge John G. Roberts Jr. never lost his cool and never gave an inch. He was soft-spoken, even-tempered and smoothly evasive through a long day of questioning. Politely but resolutely, he refused to let senators bait him into offering his views on emotional legal issues while avoiding mistakes that might have impeded his smooth sail to confirmation as chief justice. President Bush's first Supreme Court nominee presented himself as a moderate conservative, an old-fashioned judge who believes cases should be decided from bottom-up facts, rather than from an overarching, top-down ideology.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
Very few things unite Democratic and Republican senators in Washington. But unfortunately, one thing that does is attacking the human rights of Palestinians. And now they're are at it again. This time in the form of an anti-Palestinian amendment sponsored by Sens. Charles Schumer, Robert Menendez, John Barrasso and Lindsey Graham that would punish the government of Palestine for seeking United Nations recognition and heavily sanction it if it petitions the International Criminal Court for Justice.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Their interest and their influence fading, Christian conservatives are struggling to regain the power that not long ago helped Republicans elect a president and win control of Congress. Since Bill Clinton left the scene, Christians have retreated from elective politics, no longer stirred to anger by a president they abhorred, and frustrated by their inability to enact laws barring abortion and permitting school prayer. In 2000, about 4 million Christian conservative voters sat out the election.
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