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NEWS
June 23, 2009
On June 19, 2009, LINDBERGH SR., beloved husband of Christine Carpenter. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Wednesday 1 to 8 PM. The family will receive friends at Har Sinai Church of Christ, 300 S. Broadway, Thursday 10:30 AM. Funeral services will begin 11 AM. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery, Wednesday July 1, 2009, 11:30 AM. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The American Cancer Society....
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The Orioles made their triumphant return to the postseason in 2012. The odds of them getting back there in 2013, if you trust Baseball Prospectus' projection, are less than 5 percent . It's one of those preseason predictions that had Adam Jones saying last month that “Sometimes I wish the media would just shut the hell up. " It's not that the numbers crunchers at Baseball Prospectus hate the Orioles. It's just that much of what the O's did last year either isn't quantifiable (like deftly shuttling players up and down from the minors)
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FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | February 3, 1991
Q: I have a Spirit of St. Louis model plane made of metal that was manufactured by the Metalcraft Corp. of St. Louis and that was bought sometime between 1928 and 1930. The plane's rudder and landing gear are missing, and its wooden tail wheel was worn out. Where can I find the missing parts?A: Collectors of Spirit of St. Louis and Charles Lindbergh memorabilia belong to the C.A.L./NX-211 Collectors Society (which stands for Charles A. Lindbergh and the registration number of his plane). Annual membership and monthly newsletter are $12 from Sallie G. Fowler, 6 Todd Drive, North Haven, Conn.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 17, 2009
In the buildup to the trial of Mayor Sheila Dixon on theft charges, we did not hear much about Lindbergh Carpenter Jr. He was not billed as the leading man or even a star witness. He is not, as far as anyone knows, a former boyfriend of the mayor. He's not a current boyfriend, either. He's not a real estate developer. He's neither mover nor shaker. But I have a feeling that what Lindbergh Carpenter Jr. said, almost in passing, Monday morning two flights above Calvert Street might have greater impact than previously projected.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SMITH | August 27, 1995
It was called "the crime of the century." It had everything -- the presence of an American icon, a world-renowned celebrity. One of the country's most famous lawyers for the defense. A vast amount of physical evidence apparently implicating thedefendant, but also charges that some of it had been planted by overzealous detectives and accusations of evidence tampering. It was an expensive trial, with a sequestered jury whose ability to remain impartial under the glare of incredible publicity and press coverage was doubted.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2007
John Kenneth Wenderoth, a retired aviation quality control worker, died of heart failure Wednesday at Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm. The former Baldwin resident was 93. Mr. Wenderoth was born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale and Essex. After graduating from Sparrows Point High School in 1929, he went to work at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River and stayed when it became Martin Marietta Corp. He retired in 1967 after his division was sold to Teledyne Energy Systems in Hunt Valley.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
An anxious crowd standing in the rain on May 20, 1927 gave a sigh of relief as the tiny, mud-spattered aircraft bouncing down the rain-soaked runway at Roosevelt Field on Long Island finally lifted off, barely clearing telephone wires at the edge of the field. It was 7:52 a.m., and the Spirit of St. Louis, with 450 gallons of fuel in her tanks and with Charles A. Lindbergh at the throttle, quickly disappeared into the storm clouds. For Lindbergh, a 25-year-old airmail pilot and adventurer, the goal was to be the first aviator to successfully fly solo from New York to Paris and, in doing so, win the $25,000 Raymond Orteig prize for completing the journey across the Atlantic Ocean.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
Not even a driving rain could dampen the spirits of the Baltimoreans who lined the streets of the city 69 years ago this week to catch a glimpse of "Lucky Lindy," the daring aviator whose solo flight in a Ryan monoplane electrified the world and made him one of the most adored celebrities of the Roaring Twenties.The 25-year-old Charles A. Lindbergh, who flew across the Atlantic in 33 1/2 hours in the Spirit of St. Louis, created a frenzy wherever he went, and his 22-hour visit to Baltimore was no exception.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein and Myron Beckenstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2002
Maybe, somewhere deep in the darkest of Maine's eastern woods and under 75 years of accumulated forest debris, lies all that is left of the Oiseau Blanc (White Bird) and all that is left of its two pilots, Charles Nungesser and Francois Coli. At least, that is one theory about what happened to one of the planes competing with Charles Lindbergh in 1927's great race across the Atlantic Ocean. Another is that Nungesser and Coli never made it as far as Maine - despite the airplane noises heard the afternoon of May 9 - and perished at sea. However they died, their failure left the way open for the young American to have his chance.
FEATURES
May 25, 1999
When you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/In 1903, what's the farthest any plane had flown?Which type of ball is used in Street Ball?Can you remember what two things make a droodle? (Go to http://www.exploratorium.edu/memory to find out.)SPIRIT OF ST. LOUISAt the young age of 25, Charles Lindbergh was the toast of the world after becoming the first person to fly across the Atlantic. At PBS' American Experience Web site dedicated to Lindbergh, you'll discover a fascinating world of aviation and adventure.
NEWS
June 23, 2009
On June 19, 2009, LINDBERGH SR., beloved husband of Christine Carpenter. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Wednesday 1 to 8 PM. The family will receive friends at Har Sinai Church of Christ, 300 S. Broadway, Thursday 10:30 AM. Funeral services will begin 11 AM. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery, Wednesday July 1, 2009, 11:30 AM. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The American Cancer Society....
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 26, 2008
Philip K. Morris, a retired commercial photographer who worked in space exploration in the 1960s, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at College Manor in Lutherville. The former Rodgers Forge resident was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton, he attended St. Dominic's Parochial School. He dropped out of high school to help support his family during the Depression. He wanted an education and took evening vocational classes offered by city public schools in 1937. He joined his father and brothers at the Glenn L. Martin aircraft plant in Middle River.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2007
John Kenneth Wenderoth, a retired aviation quality control worker, died of heart failure Wednesday at Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm. The former Baldwin resident was 93. Mr. Wenderoth was born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale and Essex. After graduating from Sparrows Point High School in 1929, he went to work at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River and stayed when it became Martin Marietta Corp. He retired in 1967 after his division was sold to Teledyne Energy Systems in Hunt Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 24, 2006
James Stewart -- The Signature Collection [Warner] $50 The title of this Stewart set is in itself misleading: It doesn't contain any of the lanky actor's signature roles, such as his Academy Award-winning turn in The Philadelphia Story or the beloved It's a Wonderful Life. But the six films offered are of interest. Though he's a bit old to play baseball player Monty Stratton in 1949's The Stratton Story, Stewart gives a folksy, charming turn in the true-life story of the Chicago White Sox pitcher who made a remarkable return to the sport after he lost his leg in an accident.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2005
LE BOURGET, France - The talk at the Paris Air Show this week was not just of the latest in aerial technology, but of business, as states from Alabama to Washington showed up, often in splashy ways, to sell themselves to foreign companies and investors. Some of the efforts were quite sophisticated. The Alabama delegation had a roster of events in Paris and a colorful booth at the airfield with the theme that Alabama was super pour le developpement economique. The state's promotional literature prominently noted that Alabama was discovered in 1702 by the French explorer Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein and Myron Beckenstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2004
Charles Lindbergh sometimes gets credit for being the first person to fly across the Atlantic, but he wasn't. That accomplishment was recorded in 1919. Lindbergh was the first to fly nonstop from New York to Paris, without landing in places like Newfoundland, Ireland or the Azores. But a trip even more amazing and three years before Lindbergh's began 80 years ago. And it was barely 20 years after the Wright brothers flew 120 feet. On April 6, 1924, four U.S. Army open-cockpit biplanes took off on an attempt to fly around the world.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | December 18, 1991
Washington. -- Considered in the abstract, the words ''America First'' could hardly offend anyone lucky enough to be a citizen of this country. But after more than two centuries ofpolitical dialogue, most such phrases suggest more than they say.Anyone familiar with our 20th-century history, such as the commentator Pat Buchanan, surely understands this. Thus, in declaring his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination on an ''America First'' platform, he knowingly associates himself with the best-known earlier political movement of that name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 24, 2006
James Stewart -- The Signature Collection [Warner] $50 The title of this Stewart set is in itself misleading: It doesn't contain any of the lanky actor's signature roles, such as his Academy Award-winning turn in The Philadelphia Story or the beloved It's a Wonderful Life. But the six films offered are of interest. Though he's a bit old to play baseball player Monty Stratton in 1949's The Stratton Story, Stewart gives a folksy, charming turn in the true-life story of the Chicago White Sox pitcher who made a remarkable return to the sport after he lost his leg in an accident.
TOPIC
By Albert Scardino and Albert Scardino,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2003
LONDON - The huge fuss being made around the world over English soccer star David Beckham must leave Americans wondering. Is "Becks" this generation's Pele? Is he the Babe Ruth of soccer? Is he Michael Jordan? Tiger Woods? All of these, and less. He takes a mean free kick - "Bend it like Beckham" means more around the world these days than "Win one for the Gipper" - but mostly he has become famous for being famous. Michael Jackson or Madonna, without the music. Which part bewildered you the most?
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein and Myron Beckenstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2002
Maybe, somewhere deep in the darkest of Maine's eastern woods and under 75 years of accumulated forest debris, lies all that is left of the Oiseau Blanc (White Bird) and all that is left of its two pilots, Charles Nungesser and Francois Coli. At least, that is one theory about what happened to one of the planes competing with Charles Lindbergh in 1927's great race across the Atlantic Ocean. Another is that Nungesser and Coli never made it as far as Maine - despite the airplane noises heard the afternoon of May 9 - and perished at sea. However they died, their failure left the way open for the young American to have his chance.
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