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Linda Tripp

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NEWS
By Harold Jackson | August 23, 1998
THE WOMAN who brought the nation to Howard County may become only a footnote in history. But Linda Tripp should receive some mention.When network news camera crews staked out her home in Columbia months ago, it was still difficult to predict the result of her accusations of presidential promiscuity. The ultimate outcome is yet to be determined. But in many ways, her deed has already changed the nation forever.The public disclosure by Ms. Tripp of secretly taped conversations with a "friend" who claimed to have had sexual liaisons with President Clinton led to the completion of a process that began, oh, about 35 years ago.The tardy but subsequent admission by President Clinton that he was dishonest about his relationship with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky removed the aura that managed to cling to the office of President of the United States despite Kennedy's mob ties, Johnson's ugly war, Nixon's burglary and Reagan's Contras.
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NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
As Howard County's top Circuit Court judge, Diane Leasure has been described by colleagues as a fair-minded, even-keeled arbiter. One veteran defense attorney went so far as to call Leasure an "ideal judge". So it might be difficult to imagine the obstacles she faced when she first sought a nomination in 1995. Leasure had been working as an attorney in Prince George's County, and most on the nominating commission viewed her as an outsider. Jason Shapiro, a defense lawyer and former assistant state's attorney who was a member of the commission, said some thought Leasure was a "carpetbagger of sorts" because of her ties to the county and, indirectly, to its former executive, then-Gov.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 15, 1998
HAVING HELPED make Linda Tripp the most reviled woman in America, here came Lucianne Goldberg last week, dishing her side of things to a grand jury in Ellicott City and coquettishly asking: What's a girl to do?For openers, try telling us the truth. In their rush to hoist Bill Clinton on his own libido and win for themselves a juicy book (or tape) contract, Tripp and Goldberg can't even get their stories straight."Blame it on me," said Goldberg, the New York literary (you should pardon the expression)
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 14, 2006
If you happen to see me on the street and notice a dazed, confused expression on my face, it will be my astonishment about why Ann Coulter's comments about some widows of 9/11 victims became front-page news last week. In her new book, Godless: The Church of Liberalism, Coulter referred to the widows as "witches" and "harpies." She added that "I've never seen people enjoying their husbands' deaths so much." Editors of the New York Daily News thought Coulter's opining was worthy of a cover story.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 1, 1998
At The Mall in Columbia, I head straight for that wonderful new historic landmark, RadioShack, located picturesquely above that other treasured American landmark, the shopping center food court, to purchase what is now known in the trade as the Linda Tripp National Yenta Telephone Recording Device.Is this a great country, or what?Here at the Columbia Mall RadioShack, any citizen, young or old, Democrat or Republican, concerned friend or back-stabbing slimeball, can purchase an innocent-looking electronic device officially called a Telephone Recording Control, which allows the purchaser to secretly tape record phone conversations, whether they're the stuff of national security or Nobody's Damned Business but Bill and Hillary's.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 27, 1998
On the morning that Linda Tripp kissed off her anonymous little life and became a household name, particularly in the Clinton household, she gazed out of her living room window in Columbia and saw before her the first signs of a government coming undone.There were reporters waiting in her front yard, and television cameras and microphones. Tripp did not move. She had a little handwritten sign on her front door: Do Not Disturb. No matter that she was profoundly disturbing the nation with her accusations about Bill Clinton, and her secret taping of Monica Lewinsky, Tripp had now decided she wished to be alone and discreet.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 26, 1998
AND SO WE COME to that grand day when each of us, from Parris Glendening to Ellen Sauerbrey, from Daniel P. Henson to Susan Gaffney, from Thomas Frazier to Martin O'Malley, from Peter Angelos to Roberto Alomar, from Bill Clinton to Linda Tripp, from - ah, write your own darned comparison - gives thanks for our bountiful blessings.So, somewhere between the first of the televised football games and the last of the turkey giblets and sauerkraut and Bromo Seltzer, herewith our 23rd consecutive offering of Things to Be Thankful For.To wit:Be thankful Daniel P. Henson wants to tear down public housing just as Washington officials want to investigate millions in overspent federal money for shoddy workmanship on some of that very housing.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 6, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Although most Americans may be sick of the whole thing, Washington is agog over the long-awaited appearance of Linda Tripp before the grand jury. The issue may be trivial, but the political stakes are high.Mobs of reporters and camera crews swarm around the federal court building to report her arrivals and departures. The airwaves are filled with speculation about the credibility of the woman who recorded her friend, Monica Lewinsky, talking on the telephone about her alleged relationship with President Clinton.
NEWS
May 25, 2000
WITH the dropping of state charges against Linda Tripp, she passes from history and need never trouble her fellow Marylanders again. Some will wonder what this federal civil servant does at the Defense Department to earn a salary in a classification for which she does not appear qualified, and whether she will go on doing it. But that is a minor matter. Linda Tripp is world famous for violating Maryland's law against recording a telephone call when one of the parties does not know it is being recorded.
NEWS
June 21, 1998
STATE Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli seems determined to become another victim of the Monica Lewinsky matter.Initially, he gave signs of moving forward with an inquiry into whether former White House aide Linda Tripp illegally taped phone conversations with Ms. Lewinsky in which she claimed to have had an affair with President Clinton.Ms. Tripp, a former White House aide seeking a book deal, recorded the calls from her Columbia home. Howard County State's Attorney Marna McLendon should have investigated immediately, but she stumbled on the job and then washed her hands of the case by turning it over to Mr. Montanarelli.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
The easygoing Baltimore lawyer representing the man in the center of the Allfirst financial debacle is no stranger to high-profile figures attracting worldwide attention - from the limousine driver in the murder case that embroiled Ravens star Ray Lewis to Linda Tripp and her secret recordings that helped impeach President Bill Clinton. But unlike many of his clients, David B. Irwin, 54, a 1966 Gilman School graduate who rose quietly but steadily to a reputation as one of the Baltimore area's top criminal lawyers, has never acquired a flamboyant image.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 15, 2001
A foreclosure action against Linda R. Tripp, whose secret recordings of White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky resulted in the impeachment of former President Bill Clinton, was dismissed yesterday after the mortgage-holder for her Columbia home asked trustees working on its behalf to halt the proceedings. Joseph Murtha, who represented Tripp in the state's unsuccessful prosecution on wiretap charges related to the scandal, said yesterday that Tripp had caught up on any missed or late payments before the foreclosure on the Cricket Pass house was filed, but those payments were not recorded in time to forestall the legal paperwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,Sun Staff | June 11, 2000
When legions of reporters began besieging her once quiet Columbia home, Linda R. Tripp put sheets over her windows and hunkered down, watching countless hours of cable news programs devoted to the White House sex scandal her secret tape recording helped expose. She was upset. The world seemed to hate her. Paparazzi were camped in cars outside her house with camera lenses that she said looked like "medium-sized tree limbs." Some reporters even asked her children out on dates. Where to turn for support?
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | May 28, 2000
I HOPE LINDA Tripp isn't doing any celebratory cartwheels over this. She beat a 50-to-1 sure-thing guilty verdict on a loophole, which is always a plus but is not to be confused with exoneration. When she looks in the mirror every morning, she will still see the face of the most vilified woman in America. She retired that trophy for violating not Maryland's wiretap law, but the laws of decency between human beings. When Howard County Circuit Judge Diane Leasure effectively killed the state prosecutor's case against Tripp last week by narrowing the evidence she would allow in open court, Leasure was looking at the technicalities of law books.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Linda Tripp gets off scot-free -- in Maryland's judicial system. Won't face 10 years in prison. Doesn't have to worry about a $20,000 fine for her alleged violation of the state's wiretap laws back in December 1997, when she began compiling her tape library of Monica Lewinsky's confidences. But for those of you who think Tripp is lucky -- she was, by the way, the only major figure in the impeachment scandal to face a criminal charge -- consider the sentence doled out, one liner at a time, in the court of public opinion.
NEWS
May 25, 2000
WITH the dropping of state charges against Linda Tripp, she passes from history and need never trouble her fellow Marylanders again. Some will wonder what this federal civil servant does at the Defense Department to earn a salary in a classification for which she does not appear qualified, and whether she will go on doing it. But that is a minor matter. Linda Tripp is world famous for violating Maryland's law against recording a telephone call when one of the parties does not know it is being recorded.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Caitlin Francke contributed to this article | July 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Linda R. Tripp lashed out at the Maryland state prosecutor yesterday, saying that his launch of a grand jury investigation into her secret tape recordings was a politically motivated effort to "intimidate" her.As Tripp testified for the third time before a federal grand jury here yesterday, the state prosecutor, Stephen Montanarelli, announced that he had asked a Howard County grand jury to investigate whether Tripp violated the state's wiretap...
FEATURES
October 13, 1998
Without Linda Tripp, her tape recorder and a little microphone taped to her thigh, President Clinton would not be where he is today - facing impeachment hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives. The seven men and women taking part in our People's Panel agreed with that conclusion, but most found nothing noble in Tripp's decision to record her conversations with the president's Oval Office paramour, Monica Lewinsky. So today we discuss Tripp's actions and, as always, the wise rabbi from Columbia, Martin Siegel, tries to lead us from the mud to a higher ground.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
We asked: Do you care about the Linda Tripp case anymore? Howard Circuit Judge Diane O. Leasure is scheduled to rule tomorrowon whether Tripp should go to trial on charges that she recorded a conversation with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky about her relationship with President Clinton. What should Leasure do? Linda Tripp is a whistle-blower and I am ashamed that Howard County is prosecuting her. Every whistle-blower must do something that, if not illegal, is at least against company rules.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 21, 2000
Senate OKs bill to jail an aggressive driver for causing a death Aggressive drivers who cause a death in a motor vehicle accident could be sent to jail under a bill approved by the state Senate last night. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Jean W. Roesser, a Montgomery County Republican, would create the charge of homicide by aggressive driving. It would apply to a driver who commits two major traffic offenses in the course of an accident that takes a life. Those convicted would face a maximum penalty of a year in jail and a $1,000 fine.
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