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Linda Pastan

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By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | September 23, 1993
You could tell the real poetry lovers by the way they leaned forward as Linda Pastan read at Severn School yesterday, by their intense looks and serious questions.When did Maryland's poet laureate start writing? (Age 12.) Who were her favorite poets? (Yeats and T.S. Eliot.) Was she really as angry at men as some of her poems sounded?At this question, the Potomac resident looked surprised and started to laugh."I've recently celebrated my 40th wedding anniversary," she said. While women have not always been treated with the quality they deserve and some of her poems reflect that, she said, "I clearly like men!"
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NEWS
By Ted Kooser | November 26, 2006
Linda Pastan, who lives in Maryland, is a master of the kind of water-clear writing that enables us to see into the depths. This is a poem about migrating birds, but also one about how it feels to witness the passing of another year. - Ted Kooser "The Birds" are heading south, pulled by a compass in the genes. They are not fooled by this odd November summer, though we stand in our doorways wearing cotton dresses. We are watching them as they swoop and gather -- the shadow of wings falls over the heart.
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NEWS
By Ted Kooser | November 26, 2006
Linda Pastan, who lives in Maryland, is a master of the kind of water-clear writing that enables us to see into the depths. This is a poem about migrating birds, but also one about how it feels to witness the passing of another year. - Ted Kooser "The Birds" are heading south, pulled by a compass in the genes. They are not fooled by this odd November summer, though we stand in our doorways wearing cotton dresses. We are watching them as they swoop and gather -- the shadow of wings falls over the heart.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | September 23, 1993
You could tell the real poetry lovers by the way they leaned forward as Linda Pastan read at Severn School yesterday, by their intense looks and serious questions.When did Maryland's poet laureate start writing? (Age 12.) Who were her favorite poets? (Yeats and T.S. Eliot.) Was she really as angry at men as some of her poems sounded?At this question, the Potomac resident looked surprised and started to laugh."I've recently celebrated my 40th wedding anniversary," she said. While women have not always been treated with the quality they deserve and some of her poems reflect that, she said, "I clearly like men!"
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | February 14, 1995
Acclaimed poet Linda Pastan refers to one of her poems in "An Early Afterlife" to explain why she writes:. . . When the word calls, you followeven in the kitchen proofing yeast for bread. . . .For whether or not you want it,whether or not you're ready, you mustgrasp it now in your good right handas if it alone can save you.As Ms. Pastan sees it, the word has called her many times. "An Early Afterlife," just published, is her ninth book of poetry. It will be showcased at 8 tonight at a Folger Shakespeare Library reading with Robert Creeley, another highly regarded poet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | March 20, 2008
Play ball! The ninth annual Baysox Free Family FunFest ushers in the Bowie ball club's coming season with inflatable games; rides; carnival activities; a visit by Louie, the team's mascot; and free samples of ballpark food. Children also get unlimited access to the Kids Park's various entertainment, including a moon bounce and carousel. The event runs 10 a.m.-2 p.m. (rain or shine) Saturday at Prince George's Park, 4101 N.E. Crain Highway, Bowie. Call 301-805-6000 or go to baysox.com.
NEWS
By Rod Coffee and Rod Coffee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1998
Like the first rain on the parched land of Israel after a hot, arid summer, a collection of poems leads the reader into a season of soul-searching, transformation and promise.Poets have always been interpreters of dreams and harbingers, says leading Israeli poet Moshe Dor, co-editor of "After the First Rain: Israeli Poems on War and Peace." Readings from the compilation of works by Israeli poets will be presented Sunday in Columbia."I think it's the first book of its kind because of the range of people involved," Dor said.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | August 25, 1991
How much is your first edition of John Barth's "The Floating Opera" worth by now? Of "Maryland Silversmiths, 1715-1830"? Of "A Branch of May: Poems"? The answers are there, in dollars, in "Collected Books: The Guide to Values," by Allen and Patricia Ahearn of Rockville. Just out (Putnam, $50), with about 15,000 entries, this is the first such U.S. compendium since "The Book Collector's Handbook of Values," by the late Van Allen Bradley, in 1982.What books rate the term "collected"? The Ahearns, veterans of the business themselves as Quill & Brush book shop, go by current market standards.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 30, 1992
The nerve.A state legislator in Virginia has introduced a bill that would make Edgar Allan Poe that state's official poet and short-story writer.In Baltimore -- where Poe lived for a time as a young man, where he wrote his first horror story, and where he died and was buried in 1849 -- the news came like a slap to the forehead."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 30, 1992
The nerve.A state legislator in Virginia has introduced a bill that would make Edgar Allan Poe that state's official poet and short-story writer.In Baltimore -- where Poe lived for a time as a young man, where he wrote his first horror story, and where he died and was buried in 1849 -- the news came like a slap to the forehead."
NEWS
By Clarinda Harriss and Clarinda Harriss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 1998
Poetry may not be pretty, but by golly it's useful. It's as useful as the cheap ballpoint pen with which most late-20th-century poems are written. It's portable, dependable and, whether colorful or transparent, it's got a thin vein of vital fluid inside, ready to get the job done.Most poets are eager for their poems to be useful. When they mutter about Art for Art's Sake, they're just going through a spell of feeling useless. Then they get over it and tell us plainly how we're supposed to use their poems.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2000
As regional summer arts festivals go, it would be safe to say that the Columbia Festival of the Arts has finally hit its stride. Since its inception 12 years ago, the festival has grown at a steady pace. Tens of thousands of people converge on Columbia each June to attend an eclectic mix of more than 100 events, including free music shows; street performances; food and crafts stalls; artisan demonstrations; and at least one performance by a headliner whose show sells out quickly. Performers, too, are drawn to Columbia to play at the festival, which is making a name for itself as an event that can draw stars, up-and-coming entertainers and cutting-edge artists.
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