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Linda Day

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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 8, 2003
For more on the visual arts, go to www.SunSpot.net/artBaltimore is a town blessed with stellar arts education institutions, from Maryland Institute College of Art and Peabody Conservatory to any number of first-rate programs at area colleges and universities. Given this abundance of talent, it should come as no surprise that instructors of genius are likely to turn up even in places not otherwise well-known for training young artists. Such is the case with the program run by Associate Professor Linda Day Clark at Coppin State College, where most students taking the basic photo course are majoring in fields - nursing, education, criminal justice - unrelated to art. Yet after a semester in Clark's class, many of these young people emerge producing work comparable to that being done in the top fine-arts schools.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 24, 2004
In the first decades of the 20th century, Andre Kertesz, Jacque-Henri Lartigue and Henri Cartier-Bresson invented what is known as "street photography," the artful snapshooting of people captured as they go about their business in public places. Baltimore photographer Linda Day Clark is an heir to that tradition, and as her show on view at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore through the end of this month demonstrates, she is a contemporary master of the genre. Many of the photographs in the show were taken on the streets on and around North Avenue, where the artist has lived and worked for the past 15 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 1, 2004
The middle room on the first floor of photographer Linda Day Clark's house off North Avenue is chockablock with pictures. They're stacked on tables, piled on chairs, lying on the floor and propped against walls covered by even more pictures. Things look pretty chaotic but Clark, standing amid the clutter in jeans and sweater, seems perfectly calm as she methodically flips through 15 years worth of images. She is trying to choose which pictures to exhibit in her solo show that will open Thursday at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and run through Feb. 26. "I've got all these piles of photographs here, and I'm trying to decide what will be in and what will be out," she says matter-of-factly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 1, 2004
The middle room on the first floor of photographer Linda Day Clark's house off North Avenue is chockablock with pictures. They're stacked on tables, piled on chairs, lying on the floor and propped against walls covered by even more pictures. Things look pretty chaotic but Clark, standing amid the clutter in jeans and sweater, seems perfectly calm as she methodically flips through 15 years worth of images. She is trying to choose which pictures to exhibit in her solo show that will open Thursday at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and run through Feb. 26. "I've got all these piles of photographs here, and I'm trying to decide what will be in and what will be out," she says matter-of-factly.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1997
When the sun sets on North Avenue, a golden light rolls from east to west, illuminating the faces of children at play, street vendors, church women and teens resting on stoops.The light reveals their transcendent beauty; it exalts their skin of many colors: brown, black, tan, cocoa, freckly orange and gilds the street's faded facades.This is the time of day when Linda Day Clark grabs her camera and walks up and down North Avenue, searching for faces that tell a truth about her community most people don't see. What they see is a forbidding boulevard of abandoned storefronts, suspicious characters, and neglected rowhouses.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 24, 2004
In the first decades of the 20th century, Andre Kertesz, Jacque-Henri Lartigue and Henri Cartier-Bresson invented what is known as "street photography," the artful snapshooting of people captured as they go about their business in public places. Baltimore photographer Linda Day Clark is an heir to that tradition, and as her show on view at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore through the end of this month demonstrates, she is a contemporary master of the genre. Many of the photographs in the show were taken on the streets on and around North Avenue, where the artist has lived and worked for the past 15 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | April 13, 2006
`Damaged Land scapes: Resilient Spirits' Photographs of war-riddled Iraq and Afghanistan will be shown in a new exhibit at Creative Alliance at the Patterson. Damaged Landscapes: Resilient Spirits is an installation of the Moving Walls series. The photos of Iraq and Afghanistan were shot by Sean Hemmerle and Steve McCurry, respectively, and highlight various aspects of the conditions in these countries. There will also be photos of Baltimore by Linda Day. The exhibit runs today through May 6. There will be a reception and educational forum 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | October 31, 1996
Photographer Linda Day Clark teaches at Coppin State College and lives and takes photographs in the vicinity of North Avenue. In her work, she tries to reach beyond the crime and poverty that people may see on the news and probe the everyday lives of the people who live there. She has also photographed in Nigeria, where she traveled in 1994.Her North Avenue and Nigeria photos are featured in an exhibit of her work opening at Fells Point MAP on Saturday. The works were chosen by guest curator Deborah Willis, who is curator of exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institution Center for African-American History/Culture.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
On April 5, 2003, MARYLAND, devoted wife of the late Orrester Shaw Sr., beloved mother of three sons, Moscow S., Dr. Roosevelt and Orrester Shaw Jr., four daughters, Delores Callaway, Rebecca Baylor, Linda Day and Glinda Gathers; one sister, Berlin Richardson; she is also survived by eighteen grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, one son-in-law, three daughters-in-law, two brothers-in-law, four sisters-in-law and many other nieces, nephews, cousins and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg | April 11, 1999
Bungalow Bill Clinton, Lady Monica, Linda Day Tripper, Polythene Paula and all the other fools on the Hill certainly got into a mess this past year.And paperback writers Andrew Morton, Michael Isikoff and George Stephanopoulos all did their best to cash in with their own sordid chronicles of the Clinton-Lewinsky saga.But last week's cover of the New York Times Book Review was surely the most artful statement on the incident so far. A parody of the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover, it substituted scandal figures for the Fab Four and famous historical faces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 8, 2003
For more on the visual arts, go to www.SunSpot.net/artBaltimore is a town blessed with stellar arts education institutions, from Maryland Institute College of Art and Peabody Conservatory to any number of first-rate programs at area colleges and universities. Given this abundance of talent, it should come as no surprise that instructors of genius are likely to turn up even in places not otherwise well-known for training young artists. Such is the case with the program run by Associate Professor Linda Day Clark at Coppin State College, where most students taking the basic photo course are majoring in fields - nursing, education, criminal justice - unrelated to art. Yet after a semester in Clark's class, many of these young people emerge producing work comparable to that being done in the top fine-arts schools.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1997
When the sun sets on North Avenue, a golden light rolls from east to west, illuminating the faces of children at play, street vendors, church women and teens resting on stoops.The light reveals their transcendent beauty; it exalts their skin of many colors: brown, black, tan, cocoa, freckly orange and gilds the street's faded facades.This is the time of day when Linda Day Clark grabs her camera and walks up and down North Avenue, searching for faces that tell a truth about her community most people don't see. What they see is a forbidding boulevard of abandoned storefronts, suspicious characters, and neglected rowhouses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 15, 1998
"With an Eye Toward Our Neighbors" is a two-location photography show in Howard County featuring artists with an interest in communities and social settings. Included are Taisee Berkeley's documentary essay on the lives of urban schoolchildren at City Springs Elementary School; Carl Clark's photographs of natives of Baltimore and Nigeria; Jim Burger's portraits of vendors and other workers at Oriole Park at Camden Yards; Linda Day Clark's studies of young black women living in Baltimore; Aaron Levin's portrait biographies of those who settled Israel and fought in its 1948 war of independence; and a variety of subject matter by photographer Jefferson Jackson Steele.
EXPLORE
March 21, 2012
A tea party was held at Mary Reed's home in Bel Air Sunday, Feb. 19, hosted by Reed's niece, Alfreda "Freda" Phillips. The reason for the gathering was to visit with the remaining family members of the older generation to reminisce about days gone by. It was also Reed's 92nd birthday. The family is getting smaller and it is harder to get everyone together to visit especially the older ones. Some don't drive anymore, some don't drive at night, and many have aliments that restrict them from doing the things they used to do. Tea and finger sandwiches, small cakes and cookies were made and served by Debbie and Amber Lassen, Phillips' daughter and granddaughter.
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