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By Los Angeles Times | December 18, 1990
Got that slightly crazed, holidazed feeling? We'll try to help -- o at least give you a few seasonal laughs -- weekdays in The Sun.CHICAGO -- Dr. Dolittle would have been proud."
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NEWS
May 29, 2013
Regarding Timothy B. Wheeler's recent article on declining amphibian populations, the mysterious disappearance of many frogs may be due to an invasive plant species known as buckthorn ("Alarming U.S. decline seen in environment's sentinels," May 23). Buckthorn was imported from Europe in the 19th century and was initially employed for garden hedges. But since then it has spread throughout the woodlands of America. Buckthorn is notorious for shading other native plants, inhibiting their growth and allowing increased visibility for amphibian predators.
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NEWS
May 29, 2013
Regarding Timothy B. Wheeler's recent article on declining amphibian populations, the mysterious disappearance of many frogs may be due to an invasive plant species known as buckthorn ("Alarming U.S. decline seen in environment's sentinels," May 23). Buckthorn was imported from Europe in the 19th century and was initially employed for garden hedges. But since then it has spread throughout the woodlands of America. Buckthorn is notorious for shading other native plants, inhibiting their growth and allowing increased visibility for amphibian predators.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | August 19, 2005
When chimpanzees in the famed Gombe National Park in Tanzania pick up sticks and poke them into termite mounds in pursuit of a tasty snack, most use their left hands. In fact, when researchers worked out the numbers, they found that -- at least when they're fishing for termites -- the Gombe chimps are left-handed by a better than 2-to-1 margin. By combing through prior chimp studies, researchers also found evidence that about twice as many chimps use their right hands to hammer nuts open with rocks and to sop up water with crumpled leaves.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | November 22, 1990
With a small crowd gathered to ogle her every move, she negotiated her Baltimore coming out with a self-assurance rare in one so young.Wrapped in an off-white fur, she strode confidently before the cameras, nuzzled her new boyfriend's nose, and finally, after emitting a snort or two, launched herself into the pool to play with the large rubber ball floating there.After spending more than a month in Baltimore out of view, Anana, the Baltimore Zoo's new, 1-year-old, 250-pound polar bear, finally got a chance to meet her public yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | August 19, 2005
When chimpanzees in the famed Gombe National Park in Tanzania pick up sticks and poke them into termite mounds in pursuit of a tasty snack, most use their left hands. In fact, when researchers worked out the numbers, they found that -- at least when they're fishing for termites -- the Gombe chimps are left-handed by a better than 2-to-1 margin. By combing through prior chimp studies, researchers also found evidence that about twice as many chimps use their right hands to hammer nuts open with rocks and to sop up water with crumpled leaves.
NEWS
By Timothy Wheeler and Timothy Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1998
Magnet the polar bear will have to draw crowds at the Baltimore Zoo by himself now. His popular female partner, Anana, died over the weekend.The 8-year-old bear, whose name means "beautiful" in the Inuit language, had been ill since Wednesday, said Jill J. Seipe, zoo spokeswoman.Dr. Mike Cranfield, the zoo's chief veterinarian, initially diagnosed the bear's inability to hold down food as an intestinal problem, but blood tests were inconclusive. Anana's condition worsened over the next two days, so Cranfield performed emergency exploratory surgery on her at the zoo, which occupies 160 acres in Druid Hill Park.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2001
Road Shows In search of America's 10 best roadside attractions John Margolies, author of "Fun Along the Road: American Tourist Attractions," has spent nearly a quarter-century touring and photographing America's roadside wonders. So, when American Heritage magazine asked him for a list of the 10 best, he balked. Ten is an awfully small number. But then Margolies buckled down and came up with these in the interest of "geographical diversity": * Trees of Mystery, Klamath, Calif.: A forest of ancient redwoods guarded by the largest statues of Paul Bunyan and his ox Babe in the United States.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
Bachelor No. 1 is a 31-year-old swinger from the Motor City named Joe who likes the ladies and drumming in his spare time. Bachelor No. 2 is a quiet 23-year-old who prefers to people-watch and goes by Charlie. Their reality dating show is set at the Baltimore Zoo, where officials want to encourage a little amore in the $5.8 million Chimp Forest. So they've trucked in two male chimpanzees from the Detroit Zoo to join six resident females. Since arriving in October, Joe and Charlie have been isolated to help them adjust to their new surroundings.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - The long-raging conflict between Smithsonian Secretary Lawrence Small and the 156-year-old institution's scholars and scientists has been resolved, largely in favor of the scientists. A report prepared by 18 of the nation's leading science experts urged that scientific research at the Smithsonian be strengthened and expanded, rather than curtailed to accommodate fiscal constraints. It warned, however, that the taxpayer-supported Smithsonian is seriously underfunded and needs new revenue sources.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 18, 1990
Got that slightly crazed, holidazed feeling? We'll try to help -- o at least give you a few seasonal laughs -- weekdays in The Sun.CHICAGO -- Dr. Dolittle would have been proud."
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | November 22, 1990
With a small crowd gathered to ogle her every move, she negotiated her Baltimore coming out with a self-assurance rare in one so young.Wrapped in an off-white fur, she strode confidently before the cameras, nuzzled her new boyfriend's nose, and finally, after emitting a snort or two, launched herself into the pool to play with the large rubber ball floating there.After spending more than a month in Baltimore out of view, Anana, the Baltimore Zoo's new, 1-year-old, 250-pound polar bear, finally got a chance to meet her public yesterday.
NEWS
By William Mullen and William Mullen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 19, 2004
While young female chimpanzees in the African wild stick close to their mothers and learn useful tasks, such as how to fish tasty termites out of the earth, young male chimps - too busy romping, playing and being nuisances - don't pay much attention at all. Such differences in girl vs. boy behavior might not surprise human parents, but scientists have shown that it extends to other primates, according to an article in the research journal Nature....
NEWS
By WILLIAM MULLEN and WILLIAM MULLEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 24, 2006
Alpha, a 45-year-old lowland gorilla at Chicago's Brookfield Zoo, would be about 70 in human terms, but she continues to display such a robust libido that two worried zoo scientists launched a study four years ago to see whether she could still get pregnant. To put it another way, they wanted to know: Do gorillas go through menopause? While human females often live a third of their lives beyond their child-bearing years, science had thought that all other species are able to reproduce until they die. But the researchers at Brookfield Zoo and Lincoln Park Zoo (also in Chicago)
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