Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLincoln Center
IN THE NEWS

Lincoln Center

NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 2, 2007
Longtime actress Anita Gillette lives in a New York City apartment and vows to stay there "until they price me out of this place." She also works quite a bit in Los Angeles -- you can catch her in The War at Home and CSI. Born Anita Luebben in Baltimore and raised in Baltimore County's Rossville -- where her brother Sonny lives in the family home -- she first caught the attention of local theatergoers at the Spotlighters and at the old Alamedian Light...
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 17, 2007
They met at Columbia Law School, and something clicked between Bob Shaye and Michael Lynne. Now, on Oct. 5, during the New York Film Festival, they'll underwrite part of the event to celebrate the 40th anniversary of their New Line Cinema. Bob and Michael have already garnered $500,000 and expect to do much more, every cent going to raise Lincoln Center's new building, designed by David Rockwell, with screening rooms, an amphitheater, offices and cafes. On this October night, New Line will show some of its 40 years of films in Jazz at Lincoln Center's Theater, plus 20 minutes of its Christmas release, His Dark Materials: The Golden Compass, starring Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
LINCOLN CENTER JAZZ ORCHESTRA WITH WYNTON MARSALIS / / May 2 / / Concert with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, jazz musician Wynton Marsalis and Odadaa (percussionists and dancers from Ghana) with their leader and drummer Yacub Addy, 8 p.m. at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. N.W., Washington. $40-$85. 800-444-1324 or kennedy-center .org.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2001
AMONG THE two dozen or so definitions for the word "cool" in the Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, the slang usage for "fine" and "excellent" best apply to student Mike Talbert's description of the professional jazz musicians who visited Arundel High School a few weeks ago. "They were pretty cool," Talbert said. "They taught us so many things in just a short time. They blew us away." Talbert, a junior and alto saxophonist, is one of about 18 members of Arundel High School Jazz Band heading to New York City this month - all no doubt hoping to be cool when they take the stage as finalists in this year's Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Competition and Festival, sponsored by Jazz at Lincoln Center.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 27, 2001
NEW YORK -The Peabody Symphony Orchestra strutted its stuff on upper Broadway Wednesday evening. The conservatory students seemed highly energized for their concert at Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, perhaps reveling in the opportunity to perform practically in the shadow of the famed Juilliard School of Music. Although turnout for this self-presented concert was disappointingly small, the audience certainly got an earful of what Peabody is made of these days. The ensemble, led with considerable intensity by music director Hajime Teri Murai, rose above even the impressive level heard in Baltimore lately.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2000
For the moment, this room in the Murphy Fine Arts Center is filled with all the chatter and noise and energy you would expect from close to 100 college students crammed inside on a rainy afternoon. Then Nathan Carter bangs out a few notes on the piano and barks out a few instructions, and out of the chaos a wondrous harmony emerges as the voices join into the Morgan State University Choir. It is a scene repeated almost every afternoon during the school year on the Northeast Baltimore campus.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 6, 2000
When word got around that the Candlelight Concert Society would be presenting a performance by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center featuring violinist Hilary Hahn, the recital in Columbia suddenly became one of the hottest tickets in town. Not only was the Howard Community College's Smith Theatre filled to capacity, but there were many more who wanted in and simply couldn't obtain tickets. It wasn't just that the Baltimore-born virtuoso was riding high in the wake of her recent Grammy nomination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 2, 2000
Home and Flower Show Lush ferns, perennials, waterfalls and ponds, arched trellises and meandering brick pathways -- the Maryland Home & Flower Show will bloom with design ideas and signs of spring for the next two weekends at the State Fairgrounds in Timonium. Following this year's theme, "International Garden Rhythms," landscape professionals will design 21 gardens, depicting more than a dozen countries from around the world. You can also have a blooming good time at craft and cooking shows and at seminars on such topics as floral design, garden care and home improvement.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2000
One of the most accomplished string quartets of them all comes Saturday night to Smith Theatre under the auspices of Candlelight Concerts. Taking the stage at 8 p.m. will be the Orion String Quartet, which serves as quartet-in-residence at the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Violinists Daniel Phillips and Todd Phillips (who share the ensemble's violin roles equally), violist Steven Tenenboim and cellist Timothy Eddy have collaborated with such luminaries as cellist Pablo Casals, pianists Rudolf and Peter Serkin and soprano Benita Valente.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 13, 1999
If jazz is America's classical music, why aren't there more groups like the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra?Clearly, if one accepts the idea that jazz has more than its share of great composers, then the need for a jazz repertory company seems obvious. How can the work of a genius like Duke Ellington be treasured if his compositions and arrangements are no longer being played?But as the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra made plain during its performance at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Tuesday, hearing another jazz band play Ellington is not the same thing as hearing the Ellington Band itself.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.