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NEWS
By Angie Cannon and Angie Cannon,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- At the White House, they can't change the sheets fast enough in the Lincoln Bedroom.One week, newly elected Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer bunked in the big rosewood bed. Another week, it was Georgia Gov. Zell Miller. This week, British Prime Minister John Major slept over.Betty Monkman, a White House curator, said there's no doubt the Clintons invite guests to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom "more than some previous administrations.""This reflects the Clintons' style of entertaining, welcoming people to their home," said Neel Lattimore, a spokesman for Hillary Rodham Clinton.
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NEWS
May 25, 2001
REMEMBER these words? "No controlling legal authority." Al Gore got slammed for proffering that phrase as an excuse for the sleazy fund raising he did when he was vice president. Now, recall these words: "I don't know the man well, but I've been disappointed about how he and his administration has conducted the fund-raising affairs. You know, going to a Buddhist temple and then claiming it wasn't a fund-raiser is just not my view of responsibility." That was candidate George W. Bush, capitalizing on Mr. Gore's missteps during last year's presidential campaign.
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NEWS
By Margaret Ebrahim | September 1, 1996
A FEW WEEKS ago, Forbes magazine reported that the Democratic National Committee was using overnight stays at the White House as a perk to entice wealthy donors to make six-figure contributions. David Brinkley of ABC News, picking up on the item for his Sunday morning television show, joked that even though a contribution of $130,000 would get you a night in the Lincoln Bedroom, "Be warned. I am told Lincoln's bed is hard and lumpy."The White House wasn't amused. Ann F. Lewis, the deputy manager of President Clinton's re-election campaign, fired off an indignant letter to Brinkley in which she pointed out that many others have slept in the Lincoln Bedroom, including "the cook from Clinton's old governor's mansion in Little Rock, a theology student with his wife and two children, and an old friend who is not well, and the president's pastor and his wife, and none of them paid as much as a dime," Brinkley said on the following week's program.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2000
It's Halloween and time once again to gather family and friends around the fireplace in a darkened room and listen to the retelling of ghost stories while sipping chilled cider. Experts in the field of spectral phenomenon claim that Maryland and Washington are rich in sightings of the not so dearly departed. In the spirit of the season, as the wind batters the shutters, the chimney moans and floors snap and pop, let's sit back and listen to two spine-tinglers. Guarding the gold Deep in Greenbriar Swamp in the lowlands of Dorchester County, residents tell the story of Big Liz, the headless African-American slave who guards a treasure trove buried by her master.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- You didn't necessarily need a pile of money to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom during President Clinton's first term. But, lacking that, you did need a certain cachet -- as a Barbra Streisand or a Billy Graham would have -- or a certain connection -- as Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke had.The White House list of overnight house guests, released yesterday, identifies 938 visitors who bunked down in the Executive Mansion between...
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The idea of inviting wealthy Democratic donors -- or potential donors -- to spend a night in the Lincoln Bedroom in the White House was approved, if not initiated, by President Clinton himself, according to documents released yesterday.The disclosures put Clinton squarely in the middle of the controversy over the fund-raising methods employed by the Democrats in the 1996 campaign.Clinton's approval came in a handwritten response to a memo from Terence McAuliffe, finance chairman of the Clinton campaign.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | April 4, 1997
WHAT KIND of sleazy pol would stoop to using the Lincoln Bedroom for crass political purposes? Dishonor the White House for the sake of getting re-elected?Well, Abraham Lincoln, for one.In 1864, fearing defeat at the polls in November, Lincoln met with some advisors to discuss campaign strategy. They often got together in what is now called the Lincoln Bedroom, but which, as Neil Grauer has pointed out on this page, was Lincoln's office in the 1860s.Social outcastLincoln had been the target of the most outrageous criticism in New York City's leading newspaper, the New York Herald.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- No gum-chewing is allowed on the People's White House Tour.Doesn't seem fair, does it? You know if you had laid out a hundred grand or so on Bill Clinton's re-election, you'd be chewing to your heart's content. And you'd be doing it in the Lincoln Bedroom to boot. All night long.But not yesterday, not on this, the Great Unwashed Tour. No gum, no balloons, no firecrackers, no electronic stun guns.A lot of fun this is going to be.Apparently word's gotten out about this. The White House Visitor's Center said to report at 7: 30 a.m. for a crack at a tour ticket yesterday.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2000
It's Halloween and time once again to gather family and friends around the fireplace in a darkened room and listen to the retelling of ghost stories while sipping chilled cider. Experts in the field of spectral phenomenon claim that Maryland and Washington are rich in sightings of the not so dearly departed. In the spirit of the season, as the wind batters the shutters, the chimney moans and floors snap and pop, let's sit back and listen to two spine-tinglers. Guarding the gold Deep in Greenbriar Swamp in the lowlands of Dorchester County, residents tell the story of Big Liz, the headless African-American slave who guards a treasure trove buried by her master.
NEWS
March 17, 1997
George Will sounds like a threatened manGeorge Will's supercilious column (Feb. 24) regarding the sculpture of suffragettes Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott in the Capitol Rotunda is so much patronizing pap.He mockingly refers to the "representation of X chromosomes in the Rotunda" and disdainfully dismisses the ''grievances of groups that feel neglected.'' Half the population of the U.S. constitutes a ''group''?The tone of the entire article is one of contemptuous derision.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | April 4, 1997
WHAT KIND of sleazy pol would stoop to using the Lincoln Bedroom for crass political purposes? Dishonor the White House for the sake of getting re-elected?Well, Abraham Lincoln, for one.In 1864, fearing defeat at the polls in November, Lincoln met with some advisors to discuss campaign strategy. They often got together in what is now called the Lincoln Bedroom, but which, as Neil Grauer has pointed out on this page, was Lincoln's office in the 1860s.Social outcastLincoln had been the target of the most outrageous criticism in New York City's leading newspaper, the New York Herald.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 23, 1997
This morning the scuzziest crack dealer on North Caroline Street wakes up and calls himself an idiot. All these years, he should have reached for a lobbyist instead of a lawyer. And every heroin trafficker at the Maryland Penitentiary and every seller of marijuana marking time at the House of Correction peers around his prison bars and tells himself, Political payoffs, you moron! That's where you went wrong!Last Thursday afternoon, in Washington, the Liggett Group Inc., makers of Chesterfields, dodging 22 state lawsuits (including Maryland's)
NEWS
March 17, 1997
George Will sounds like a threatened manGeorge Will's supercilious column (Feb. 24) regarding the sculpture of suffragettes Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott in the Capitol Rotunda is so much patronizing pap.He mockingly refers to the "representation of X chromosomes in the Rotunda" and disdainfully dismisses the ''grievances of groups that feel neglected.'' Half the population of the U.S. constitutes a ''group''?The tone of the entire article is one of contemptuous derision.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- No gum-chewing is allowed on the People's White House Tour.Doesn't seem fair, does it? You know if you had laid out a hundred grand or so on Bill Clinton's re-election, you'd be chewing to your heart's content. And you'd be doing it in the Lincoln Bedroom to boot. All night long.But not yesterday, not on this, the Great Unwashed Tour. No gum, no balloons, no firecrackers, no electronic stun guns.A lot of fun this is going to be.Apparently word's gotten out about this. The White House Visitor's Center said to report at 7: 30 a.m. for a crack at a tour ticket yesterday.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- You didn't necessarily need a pile of money to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom during President Clinton's first term. But, lacking that, you did need a certain cachet -- as a Barbra Streisand or a Billy Graham would have -- or a certain connection -- as Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke had.The White House list of overnight house guests, released yesterday, identifies 938 visitors who bunked down in the Executive Mansion between...
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The idea of inviting wealthy Democratic donors -- or potential donors -- to spend a night in the Lincoln Bedroom in the White House was approved, if not initiated, by President Clinton himself, according to documents released yesterday.The disclosures put Clinton squarely in the middle of the controversy over the fund-raising methods employed by the Democrats in the 1996 campaign.Clinton's approval came in a handwritten response to a memo from Terence McAuliffe, finance chairman of the Clinton campaign.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 23, 1997
This morning the scuzziest crack dealer on North Caroline Street wakes up and calls himself an idiot. All these years, he should have reached for a lobbyist instead of a lawyer. And every heroin trafficker at the Maryland Penitentiary and every seller of marijuana marking time at the House of Correction peers around his prison bars and tells himself, Political payoffs, you moron! That's where you went wrong!Last Thursday afternoon, in Washington, the Liggett Group Inc., makers of Chesterfields, dodging 22 state lawsuits (including Maryland's)
NEWS
May 25, 2001
REMEMBER these words? "No controlling legal authority." Al Gore got slammed for proffering that phrase as an excuse for the sleazy fund raising he did when he was vice president. Now, recall these words: "I don't know the man well, but I've been disappointed about how he and his administration has conducted the fund-raising affairs. You know, going to a Buddhist temple and then claiming it wasn't a fund-raiser is just not my view of responsibility." That was candidate George W. Bush, capitalizing on Mr. Gore's missteps during last year's presidential campaign.
NEWS
By Margaret Ebrahim | September 1, 1996
A FEW WEEKS ago, Forbes magazine reported that the Democratic National Committee was using overnight stays at the White House as a perk to entice wealthy donors to make six-figure contributions. David Brinkley of ABC News, picking up on the item for his Sunday morning television show, joked that even though a contribution of $130,000 would get you a night in the Lincoln Bedroom, "Be warned. I am told Lincoln's bed is hard and lumpy."The White House wasn't amused. Ann F. Lewis, the deputy manager of President Clinton's re-election campaign, fired off an indignant letter to Brinkley in which she pointed out that many others have slept in the Lincoln Bedroom, including "the cook from Clinton's old governor's mansion in Little Rock, a theology student with his wife and two children, and an old friend who is not well, and the president's pastor and his wife, and none of them paid as much as a dime," Brinkley said on the following week's program.
NEWS
By Angie Cannon and Angie Cannon,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- At the White House, they can't change the sheets fast enough in the Lincoln Bedroom.One week, newly elected Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer bunked in the big rosewood bed. Another week, it was Georgia Gov. Zell Miller. This week, British Prime Minister John Major slept over.Betty Monkman, a White House curator, said there's no doubt the Clintons invite guests to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom "more than some previous administrations.""This reflects the Clintons' style of entertaining, welcoming people to their home," said Neel Lattimore, a spokesman for Hillary Rodham Clinton.
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