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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 8, 1999
Limp BizkitSignificant Other (Flip/Interscope 90335)Nobody can accuse Limp Bizkit of thinking too highly of itself.Practically the first thing we hear on "Significant Other," the Florida-based quintet's sophomore release, is an electronically altered voice saying: "You wanted the worst? You got the worst!"Never mind that the line is in part poking fun at Kiss, which opens its concerts with the boast, "You wanted the best? You got the best!" Deep down, the point the guys in Limp Bizkit are trying to make is that they're not rock gods.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Special to the Sun | November 18, 2001
Trying to predict music trends is like tossing darts blindfolded. It's even worse for the music executives who have to do it for a living. For them, it's more like throwing darts at a bull's-eye on the ceiling above their desks: If they miss once, it's going to hurt. If they miss a lot, they leave the office a bloody mess. Some knowledgeable, top-level executives were invited to speak with candor and anonymity via blind quotes. The core question: Which music movements and genres are hot and which are not?
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 26, 1999
ROME, N.Y. -- In 1969, one of Woodstock's memorable moments was the tortured scream of Jimi Hendrix's guitar as it incinerated "The Star Spangled Banner." In 1999, it was the sound of silence, as the P.A. system cut out just as Limp Bizkit started to play its current single, "Nookie."Up till that point Saturday, Limp Bizkit singer Fred Durst was doing his best to take the crowd's energy -- a heady cocktail of pent-up fervor, rock show-anticipation, and chemically fueled craziness -- and channel it to a single moment of release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 23, 1999
Being ahead of your time isn't always an advantage. Nick Hexum of 311 remembers the first time his band got played by MTV, back in 1993, on the channel's underground rock show, "120 Minutes.""We were doing that rap/rock [fusion]," he says, over the phone from his Los Angeles home. "It was such a novelty, because most of the stuff they were playing at that time was the Seattle sound."Now, however, the Seattle sound is passe, while the rap/rock approach is all the rage. But because 311 was on hiatus when Limp Bizkit, Korn and Kid Rock charged up the charts, some in the music industry say the band will be playing catch-up when it releases its new album, "Soundsystem," in early October.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 19, 1999
Concerts get such a bad name, because of the mosh pit and everything like that," said Limp Bizkit guitarist Wes Borland, as he sat in a quiet cafe in his hometown of Jacksonville, Fla.It was in late May, and Limp Bizkit was still weeks away from releasing its second album, "Significant Other."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 23, 1999
Being ahead of your time isn't always an advantage. Nick Hexum of 311 remembers the first time his band got played by MTV, back in 1993, on the channel's underground rock show, "120 Minutes.""We were doing that rap/rock [fusion]," he says, over the phone from his Los Angeles home. "It was such a novelty, because most of the stuff they were playing at that time was the Seattle sound."Now, however, the Seattle sound is passe, while the rap/rock approach is all the rage. But because 311 was on hiatus when Limp Bizkit, Korn and Kid Rock charged up the charts, some in the music industry say the band will be playing catch-up when it releases its new album, "Soundsystem," in early October.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 29, 1998
Fieldy, the bass player in Korn, is talking about what a great deal the Family Values tour is. "I mean, we knew it would be good, just because of all the bands on the bill," he says, referring to a lineup that includes rapper Ice Cube, hip-hop metalists Limp Bizkit, German industrial rockers Rammstein and techno rockers Orgy."
NEWS
July 27, 1999
WOODSTOCK'S third reincarnation was a party that ended with a riot. The music festival at the former Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, N.Y., did not resemble the Age of Aquarius. Nor did anyone expect it would.The original Woodstock has, the truth be told, been sentimentalized beyond reality. The concert at Max Yasgur's farm featured some of rock music's biggest stars -- Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Joan Baez. The 350,000 youths who attended the event -- and the millions who didn't, but now act as if they did -- genuinely believed their presence and behavior at that concert changed America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Special to the Sun | November 18, 2001
Trying to predict music trends is like tossing darts blindfolded. It's even worse for the music executives who have to do it for a living. For them, it's more like throwing darts at a bull's-eye on the ceiling above their desks: If they miss once, it's going to hurt. If they miss a lot, they leave the office a bloody mess. Some knowledgeable, top-level executives were invited to speak with candor and anonymity via blind quotes. The core question: Which music movements and genres are hot and which are not?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1999
Korn and othersFamily Values Tour '98 (Immortal/Epic 69904)As roving rock festivals go, the Family Values Tour has nowhere near the name recognition enjoyed by the likes of Lollapalooza, Lilith Fair, H.O.R.D.E. or even Ozzfest.Masterminded by hip-hop-influenced hard rockers Korn, last year's Family Values Tour was mostly built around edgy, extreme acts unlikely to turn up in the Top 40 -- or, in some cases, even on MTV. Gangsta rap star Ice Cube was perhaps the best-known participant; rounding out the bill were Rammstein, Limp Bizkit, Orgy and Incubus, names that mean nothing outside hard rock and industrial music circles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 19, 1999
Concerts get such a bad name, because of the mosh pit and everything like that," said Limp Bizkit guitarist Wes Borland, as he sat in a quiet cafe in his hometown of Jacksonville, Fla.It was in late May, and Limp Bizkit was still weeks away from releasing its second album, "Significant Other."
NEWS
July 27, 1999
WOODSTOCK'S third reincarnation was a party that ended with a riot. The music festival at the former Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, N.Y., did not resemble the Age of Aquarius. Nor did anyone expect it would.The original Woodstock has, the truth be told, been sentimentalized beyond reality. The concert at Max Yasgur's farm featured some of rock music's biggest stars -- Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Joan Baez. The 350,000 youths who attended the event -- and the millions who didn't, but now act as if they did -- genuinely believed their presence and behavior at that concert changed America.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 26, 1999
ROME, N.Y. -- In 1969, one of Woodstock's memorable moments was the tortured scream of Jimi Hendrix's guitar as it incinerated "The Star Spangled Banner." In 1999, it was the sound of silence, as the P.A. system cut out just as Limp Bizkit started to play its current single, "Nookie."Up till that point Saturday, Limp Bizkit singer Fred Durst was doing his best to take the crowd's energy -- a heady cocktail of pent-up fervor, rock show-anticipation, and chemically fueled craziness -- and channel it to a single moment of release.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and Tamara Ikenberg and J.D. Considine and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1999
ROME, N.Y. -- In 1969, Woodstock meant soaking rains, total confusion and hippie bliss. In 1999, Woodstock means blistering heat, efficient organization and raging hormones."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 20, 1999
Limp Bizkit is all over the place right now.Walk into a CD shop, and practically the first thing you see is a massive display of the hip-hop-meets-hard-rock band's new disc, "Significant Other." The best-selling album in America at the moment, it nudged aside the Backstreet Boys' pop-happy "Millennium" three weeks ago and shows no sign of vacating the top spot on the Billboard charts.Head over to the magazine racks, and there's beaucoups de Bizkit there, too. Singer Fred Durst and the boys stare out from the front of Spin, while the cover of Guitar World features only Durst and guitarist Wes Borland (whose eyes, eerily enough, appear to be all pupil)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 8, 1999
Limp BizkitSignificant Other (Flip/Interscope 90335)Nobody can accuse Limp Bizkit of thinking too highly of itself.Practically the first thing we hear on "Significant Other," the Florida-based quintet's sophomore release, is an electronically altered voice saying: "You wanted the worst? You got the worst!"Never mind that the line is in part poking fun at Kiss, which opens its concerts with the boast, "You wanted the best? You got the best!" Deep down, the point the guys in Limp Bizkit are trying to make is that they're not rock gods.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and Tamara Ikenberg and J.D. Considine and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1999
ROME, N.Y. -- In 1969, Woodstock meant soaking rains, total confusion and hippie bliss. In 1999, Woodstock means blistering heat, efficient organization and raging hormones."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 20, 1999
Limp Bizkit is all over the place right now.Walk into a CD shop, and practically the first thing you see is a massive display of the hip-hop-meets-hard-rock band's new disc, "Significant Other." The best-selling album in America at the moment, it nudged aside the Backstreet Boys' pop-happy "Millennium" three weeks ago and shows no sign of vacating the top spot on the Billboard charts.Head over to the magazine racks, and there's beaucoups de Bizkit there, too. Singer Fred Durst and the boys stare out from the front of Spin, while the cover of Guitar World features only Durst and guitarist Wes Borland (whose eyes, eerily enough, appear to be all pupil)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1999
Korn and othersFamily Values Tour '98 (Immortal/Epic 69904)As roving rock festivals go, the Family Values Tour has nowhere near the name recognition enjoyed by the likes of Lollapalooza, Lilith Fair, H.O.R.D.E. or even Ozzfest.Masterminded by hip-hop-influenced hard rockers Korn, last year's Family Values Tour was mostly built around edgy, extreme acts unlikely to turn up in the Top 40 -- or, in some cases, even on MTV. Gangsta rap star Ice Cube was perhaps the best-known participant; rounding out the bill were Rammstein, Limp Bizkit, Orgy and Incubus, names that mean nothing outside hard rock and industrial music circles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 29, 1998
Fieldy, the bass player in Korn, is talking about what a great deal the Family Values tour is. "I mean, we knew it would be good, just because of all the bands on the bill," he says, referring to a lineup that includes rapper Ice Cube, hip-hop metalists Limp Bizkit, German industrial rockers Rammstein and techno rockers Orgy."
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