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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
The consumption of alcohol at this year's Baltimore Pride festivities will be confined to two designated beer gardens within the larger event footprint, organizers said Thursday. "City officials are trying to crack down on alcohol consumption," said Kelly Neel, executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, or GLCCB, which organizes the events. "They told us we had to fence in the entire perimeter of everything and have it manned by police, or have the beer gardens, which was their preference.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
For more than two decades, residents of western Anne Arundel County have fought against proposed rubble landfills that they say would bring traffic, dust and noise to their community. Now their hopes rest with the fate of a bill before the County Council that would ban such landfills from residential zones, instead relegating them to industrial areas. Several members of the County Council seemed eager to pass the bill at their last meeting, but the county's top lawyer cautioned that such a change to zoning rules comes with the risk of lawsuits.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The traditional strength of the Johns Hopkins program is showing up at the right time. With Sunday's 14-8 victory over eighth-seeded Virginia in an NCAA tournament first-round game, the Blue Jays (11-4) have limited six of their last seven opponents to under 10 goals. And with the Cavaliers going scoreless for a 20 minute, 29 second stretch and an 18 minute, 17 second stretch, the defense has shut out opponents for 15 minutes or longer 15 times this season. Coach Dave Pietramala said Johns Hopkins had better defensive showings in a 13-8 win against Albany on April 4 and an 11-6 victory over Maryland on April 12, but said the team improved as the contest developed against Virginia (10-6)
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
— Amid warnings that slashing the striped bass catch by a third next year could devastate Chesapeake Bay commercial fishermen, Atlantic states regulators agreed Tuesday to consider reducing the catch more gradually over three years. Members of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission made so many other changes to a proposal for protecting Maryland's state fish from a troubling decline that they could not finish reviewing it until Wednesday — and likely put off taking final action by three months, until fall.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Worried by recent declines in the numbers of Maryland's state fish, Atlantic states fisheries regulators are weighing slashing the annual striped bass catch by up to one-third next year all along the East Coast and in the Chesapeake Bay. The proposal, to be aired Tuesday before the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, comes six months after a study found the striped bass population verging on being overfished and the number of spawning female...
NEWS
May 11, 2014
I'd like to put in my two cents worth on the blue crab situation in the Chesapeake Bay. In his letter, Richard Anderson made a valid point as to the size of the industry and number of people that would be affected ( "Crabbing moratorium isn't the answer," May 7). However, Mr. Anderson should be more aware of the full choice between losing business for one year and losing it forever. One female crab can repopulate the entire species, and they should be protected and banned from harvesting.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
If you're not paying attention, the notion of a community group coming out against mulching facilities in eco-friendly Howard County might have you scratching your head. What appears to have started innocently last summer during the comprehensive zoning process to allow mulching facilities, sawmills and firewood processing facilities on agriculturally preserved land as a way of helping farming ended up leaving a gaping loophole, residents have said. And while any mulching facility is considered a conditional use, meaning it would have to be approved by a hearing examiner, a residents' group worries that the new regulations don't specifically limit the size of these facilities.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Over the years the residents of Washington Hill have brought back to life a neighborhood on the brink of decay to one that is a thriving, attractive place to live. However, in an effort to support and protect our neighborhood's continued progress and growth, we face a stumbling block created by a loophole in the city's zoning law that continues to impede our progress and harm the citizens of Baltimore. I recently endured a grueling six-and-a-half-hour wait to file a protest against the renewal of a non-conforming Class A establishment's liquor license in our neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Maryland regulators are weighing some of the strictest limits in the country on shale gas drilling, but a scientist Monday suggested they still may not go far enough to protect drinking water wells from contamination by methane leaking from drilling sites. Gas drilling rigs would generally have to be at least 2,000 feet from public or private water wells under rules being considered by the Maryland Department of the Environment, officials said Monday during a meeting of the governor's advisory commission on the issue.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
After a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Maryland election officials said Friday that they will no longer enforce a state law that imposes an overall limit of $10,000 on campaign contributions in a four-year election cycle. State officials said they would continue to enforce a Maryland law limiting individuals to contributing no more than $4,000 to a particular candidate during an election cycle. Donors, however, are now free to give $4,000 to as many candidates as desired. Without the limit, moneyed donors are likely to give more - or be asked to give more - and lower-profile races are more likely to get their attention.
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