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BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker and Blair S. Walker,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 23, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- For the second year in a row, a bill will be pushed in the General Assembly that its backers say will be a boon to new firms, particularly high-tech start-up companies.The so-called "limited-liability company" legislation was introduced during the most recent assembly session, but it died in committee."This form of business would spur the development of high-tech start-up companies, because it would make the research and development losses immediately available to investors as a tax write-off," said Stuart Levine, a Baltimore attorney who helped draft Senate Bill 345. A similar measure will be introduced into the House.
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NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 21, 2013
The House unanimously approved campaign finance reform Thursday, closing a loophole in state law that allows businesses to give far more than individuals can to political candidates. Without debate, delegates voted 136-0 to curb business giving while increasing donation limits for individuals.  The measure, HB1499 , was drawn up in response to changes recommended by a legislative commission that studied the state's campaign finance law. Under the bill, business owners would no longer be able to sidestep Maryland's campaign donation limits by giving to politicians through multiple "limited liability companies.
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BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 18, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Supporters of legislation to create a new form of business ownership that could help small high-tech companies attract investment are hoping the second time is the charm.Del. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., R-Baltimore Co., submitted a bill yesterday that would allow business owners to form what is known as a "limited liability company," or LLC.Although the General Assembly rejected the idea last year, the entity is now permitted in eight states, including Virginia, and is being considered in 10 others, including Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
WEATHER: Windy, with sleet, rain and snow and highs in the lower 40s.  TRAFFIC: Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues. Baltimore-area school delays TOP NEWS Boy trampled by larger-than-expected crowds during Ravens celebration : Ravens officials said they won't extend an open invitation to fans again without first passing out free tickets, after larger-than-expected crowds amassed at this week's Super Bowl celebration and an 11-year-old boy was trampled.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2000
Aug. 18 The Bay Paper Mill Inc., c/o 404 Golf Course Drive, Arnold, a provider of printing services a.k.a. The Paper Mill and as Park Print & Copy, has filed under Chapter 7. Principal: Bernard Katz, president. Assets: $22,693.35; liabilities: $414,193.06 Abbreviations a.k.a.: also known as; c/o: care of; d/b/a: doing business as; t/a: trading as; n/a: not available; H/C: Holding Company; LLC: Limited Liability Company; L/P: Limited Partnership; J/V: Joint Venture; P/A: Professional Association; P/C: Professional Corporation
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 21, 2013
The House unanimously approved campaign finance reform Thursday, closing a loophole in state law that allows businesses to give far more than individuals can to political candidates. Without debate, delegates voted 136-0 to curb business giving while increasing donation limits for individuals.  The measure, HB1499 , was drawn up in response to changes recommended by a legislative commission that studied the state's campaign finance law. Under the bill, business owners would no longer be able to sidestep Maryland's campaign donation limits by giving to politicians through multiple "limited liability companies.
NEWS
By Robert J. Strupp | June 30, 2008
Maryland has more than 300,000 limited liability companies but is among the states with the fewest requirements for formation of LLCs. There is no requirement, for example, that the owners (called members) be identified in any regulatory filing with the state. As recent articles in The Sun have shown, the ability to "hide" behind the cloak of a limited liability company enables campaign contributors to make multiple contributions to political candidates, without disclosing that such companies are all owned by the same person or persons.
NEWS
April 5, 2005
LAWMAKERS SHOULD be outraged -- but, predictably, they don't seem to be. Reports show Edward A. St. John of MIE Properties has poured $160,000 into the state's 2006 election. To accomplish this feat, he had to bypass the state's law restricting donations to $4,000 for individuals and $10,000 per company. How did he do it? By funneling the money through more than 50 companies he runs out of his Baltimore County office. And why would Mr. St. John have so many subsidiaries? Because property-holding firms such as MIE typically sort their holdings into LLCs and LLPs -- limited liability corporations and limited liability partnerships.
NEWS
January 23, 2006
For most people, transfer taxes are noticed only when it's time to sell a home. They are that slice of the pie the state and county governments take every time real estate changes hands. It's the price property owners pay - unless, of course, you're a savvy corporation. In that case, you don't have to worry. You can sell a multimillion-dollar shopping mall or high-rise office building without paying a dime of transfer tax. Here's how this outrageous tax dodge works: Commercial real estate is often held in a limited liability partnership or corporation.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
WEATHER: Windy, with sleet, rain and snow and highs in the lower 40s.  TRAFFIC: Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues. Baltimore-area school delays TOP NEWS Boy trampled by larger-than-expected crowds during Ravens celebration : Ravens officials said they won't extend an open invitation to fans again without first passing out free tickets, after larger-than-expected crowds amassed at this week's Super Bowl celebration and an 11-year-old boy was trampled.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
A commission set up to advise the General Assembly how to reform its laws governing campaign financing edged closer to consensus on some key issues but has a lot of ground to cover at its final meeting scheduled for Sept. 27. The Commission to Study Campaign Finance Law reached a clear consensus on some enforcement issues -- extending the statute of limitations for misdemeanor violations of campaign finance laws from two years to three and allowing the State Board of Elections to issue civil citations for some less severe violations without having to refer matters to the State Prosecutors' Office.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
In contrast to their rush to approve a gambling bill crafted in closed-door negotiations, Maryland lawmakers exercised commendable prudence in their handling of the other item on their to-do list for this week's special legislative session, a bill to modify the terms of a recent Court of Appeals decision on liability rules for pit bull attacks. Like the gambling bill, this one emerged from a post-regular legislative session study group, but unlike the gambling bill, it was amended in the General Assembly only amid extensive public debate and consultation with key stakeholders.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Perhaps the only welcome consequence of state Sen. Ulysses Currie's disgrace and censure over his apparent use of his public office for private gain was Senate PresidentThomas V. Mike Miller's creation of a special work group on ethics. The bipartisan committee, formed in the aftermath of Mr. Currie's acquittal in court, was charged with finding legislation to improve ethics practices in state government and to do so during the current General Assembly session. It is a disappointment, then, that one of its first recommendations is for a bill that would actually weaken ethics standards.
NEWS
December 15, 2010
Now that we have reached the one-year anniversary of the infamous AIM experience in Baltimore County Public Schools, it is time to put the entire issue to rest. Several parts of the corpse have already been buried. Most importantly, the cumbersome system foisted upon teachers last December in an e-mail from then-Assistant Superintendent Barbara Dezmon is now an unhappy memory. The circumstances surrounding that "emerging bulletin" have cast severe doubt on the credibility of Superintendent Joe A. Hairston, whose initial reaction — that he was out of his office at physical therapy and knew nothing about the email — directly contradicts Ms. Dezmon's statement that "top administrators decided" on December 16 to issue the directive (Sun, 12-27-09)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
Cruise lines make their money offering vacationers more of everything: Sunshine, food and drink, excitement. But when tragedy strikes — when a passenger is injured, or dies, or simply disappears — survivors say the cruise lines can be downright stingy: Reluctant to accept responsibility, tight even with information about what happened. Long-established U.S. Maritime law limits the lines' financial liability, in the event of the death of a passenger, to lost income, so there is often no compensation for the loss of the very young or the retired beyond funeral expenses, legal experts say. The death of Carol Martin Olson stirred an unwelcome sense of déjà vu among those who have lost loved ones about cruise ships.
NEWS
By Robert J. Strupp | June 30, 2008
Maryland has more than 300,000 limited liability companies but is among the states with the fewest requirements for formation of LLCs. There is no requirement, for example, that the owners (called members) be identified in any regulatory filing with the state. As recent articles in The Sun have shown, the ability to "hide" behind the cloak of a limited liability company enables campaign contributors to make multiple contributions to political candidates, without disclosing that such companies are all owned by the same person or persons.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Perhaps the only welcome consequence of state Sen. Ulysses Currie's disgrace and censure over his apparent use of his public office for private gain was Senate PresidentThomas V. Mike Miller's creation of a special work group on ethics. The bipartisan committee, formed in the aftermath of Mr. Currie's acquittal in court, was charged with finding legislation to improve ethics practices in state government and to do so during the current General Assembly session. It is a disappointment, then, that one of its first recommendations is for a bill that would actually weaken ethics standards.
NEWS
December 15, 2010
Now that we have reached the one-year anniversary of the infamous AIM experience in Baltimore County Public Schools, it is time to put the entire issue to rest. Several parts of the corpse have already been buried. Most importantly, the cumbersome system foisted upon teachers last December in an e-mail from then-Assistant Superintendent Barbara Dezmon is now an unhappy memory. The circumstances surrounding that "emerging bulletin" have cast severe doubt on the credibility of Superintendent Joe A. Hairston, whose initial reaction — that he was out of his office at physical therapy and knew nothing about the email — directly contradicts Ms. Dezmon's statement that "top administrators decided" on December 16 to issue the directive (Sun, 12-27-09)
NEWS
January 23, 2006
For most people, transfer taxes are noticed only when it's time to sell a home. They are that slice of the pie the state and county governments take every time real estate changes hands. It's the price property owners pay - unless, of course, you're a savvy corporation. In that case, you don't have to worry. You can sell a multimillion-dollar shopping mall or high-rise office building without paying a dime of transfer tax. Here's how this outrageous tax dodge works: Commercial real estate is often held in a limited liability partnership or corporation.
NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON and RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The House sent to President Bush yesterday a long-debated bill that would shield gun makers and sellers from lawsuits arising from the misuse of their weapons - the latest in a spate of bills aimed at limiting lawsuits that congressional leaders say are hurting business. The bill, which passed the Senate earlier this year, has been a top priority of the National Rifle Association, which accused gun control groups of attempting to use the courts to impose gun controls. Once Bush signs the bill, as expected, gun industry lawyers are expected to seek the dismissal of about a dozen cases filed by cities and crime victims.
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