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By NEWSDAY | August 15, 1997
LIMERICK, Pa. -- Nestled in racks at the bottom of a 39-foot-deep pool of water, the used fuel from the Limerick nuclear reactor betrays only the slightest hint that it will remain deadly for 10,000 years or more.The radioactive fuel gives off a faint blue glow as high-energy particles it emits speed through the water.The effect is eerily alluring - amplified by water so clean that it tricks the eye. Although 22 feet below the surface, the cross-like tops of the fuel bundles seem within reach.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 23, 2011
Hugh K. Holmes, a retired lawyer, banker and volunteer who wrote limericks and poetry in his spare time, died May 16 of renal failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Pasadena resident was 92. Mr. Holmes, whose parents owned a grocery store, was born in Baltimore and raised in Glen Burnie, where he graduated in 1936 from Glen Burnie High School. He earned his law degree from the University of Baltimore in 1944 and served in Army intelligence from 1946 to 1947.
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NEWS
March 26, 2008
NORMA RAE OTTER, age 77, of Elkton, Md, died Monday, March 24, 2008. Born on September 16, 1930, in Washington D.C., she was the daughter of the late Charles and Lena Stewart Carter. Mrs. Otter had been a sales representative for Avon. She loved her cats and baking. Survivors include her companion of 36 years, Jim Lloyd; children Bonnie Runner of Bellefonte, Pa., Edward Otter and his wife Ellen of Salisbury, Md., Larry Otter and his wife Kim of Newark, De and Cheryl DeStefano of Elkton, Md. There are two brothers, Charles Carter and wife Jean of Towson, Md., Gordon Carter and Sharon, his wife, from the Chicago area, and a sister Jane Moyer and her husband Paul of Gilbertsville, Pa. There are eight grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.
NEWS
By Rinker Buck and Rinker Buck,Tribune Newspapers | July 20, 2009
Frank McCourt, the Irish-American storyteller who parlayed the miseries of a Limerick upbringing into an extraordinary late-life literary blooming, died of cancer Sunday in New York City. Mr. McCourt, 78, had spent the past 13 years buoyantly touring the globe on reading tours and writing two sequels to his 1996 best-seller, Angela's Ashes, which sold more than 5 million copies and was translated into more than 20 languages. He had been undergoing treatment for skin cancer in recent years and been released in early June from New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Center to recuperate at his Roxbury, Conn.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
On March 1, 2006, KENNETH RAY, retired Chief Warrant Officer 3 U.S. Army of Westminster devoted husband of Joyce "Jo" Harp (nee Fridinger), father of Michael Chrest, Mark Chrest and wife Dori, Bernadette C. Harp and Holly R. Limerick and husband Dwayne, brother of Sandra Knowles and husband Frank, Dianne Hill and husband Robert, Dan B. Harp, Jr., brother-in-law of Judy and Henry Dodrer and Jean and Ron Jones, grandfather of Ashlie Warner, Meagan, Kirsten,...
NEWS
November 28, 2002
Sister Kathleen Mary, 90, grammar school principal Sister Kathleen Mary O'Keeffe, a Franciscan nun and former grammar school principal, died Saturday of respiratory disease at Assisi House, her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 90. She was a teacher and principal at St. Stephen Parochial School in Bradshaw from 1946 to 1950, and again from 1962 to 1964. She began her career in 1928 at SS. Philip and James in Charles Village and later taught at St. Peter Claver School in West Baltimore and Shrine of the Little Flower in Belair-Edison.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 10, 1990
The world's most dangerous poetry contest is back.The Sixth Annual Roger Simon Greater Eastern Seaboard Poetry Contest is about to begin.As in past years, the contest has a theme. We have a theme to keep the contest current and creative, and mainly to keep you from copying poems out of your high school poetry book and trying to pass them off as your own.This year's theme is: hard times.Saddam Hussein has the world on the brink of war. Gasoline prices are skyrocketing. People can't sell their homes.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 25, 1993
The summer doldrums are over! The World's Most Dangerous Poetry Contest has returned!The Ninth Annual Roger Simon Greater Eastern Seaboard Poetry Contest kicks off today.And as with life itself, there are many rules and few rewards:RULE ONE: All poems must be on the official theme.In 1985, the theme was Squeegee Kids, and this haiku by Allison Doherty won:Squeegees remove grimeAllowing us to see lifeMore than we wished to.Allison won an appearance on the Johnny Carson show, where she was noticed by a top literary agent and today she writes under the name Michael Crichton.
NEWS
By Rinker Buck and Rinker Buck,Tribune Newspapers | July 20, 2009
Frank McCourt, the Irish-American storyteller who parlayed the miseries of a Limerick upbringing into an extraordinary late-life literary blooming, died of cancer Sunday in New York City. Mr. McCourt, 78, had spent the past 13 years buoyantly touring the globe on reading tours and writing two sequels to his 1996 best-seller, Angela's Ashes, which sold more than 5 million copies and was translated into more than 20 languages. He had been undergoing treatment for skin cancer in recent years and been released in early June from New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Center to recuperate at his Roxbury, Conn.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 24, 1995
Just when you thought it was safe to read the newspaper, the World's Most Dangerous Poetry Contest returns!That is correct! The 11th Annual Roger Simon Greater Eastern Seaboard Poetry Contest is now under way!As we all know, without rules life would be chaos (or at least a lot like high school), so here are the rules:RULE ONE: All poems must be on the official theme. The theme is always that subject which is dominating public life at the moment.In 1985, the theme was squeegee kids, and this nifty haiku by Allison Doherty won:Squeegees remove grimeAllowing us to see lifeMore than we wished to.After she won, Allison appeared on the "Tonight" show where she was discovered by a top literary agent.
FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 7, 2008
THERE ONCE was a man from St. Paul/Who went to a fancy dress ball./He said, `Yes, I'll risk it. I'll go as a biscuit!'/And a dog ate him up in the hall."
NEWS
March 26, 2008
NORMA RAE OTTER, age 77, of Elkton, Md, died Monday, March 24, 2008. Born on September 16, 1930, in Washington D.C., she was the daughter of the late Charles and Lena Stewart Carter. Mrs. Otter had been a sales representative for Avon. She loved her cats and baking. Survivors include her companion of 36 years, Jim Lloyd; children Bonnie Runner of Bellefonte, Pa., Edward Otter and his wife Ellen of Salisbury, Md., Larry Otter and his wife Kim of Newark, De and Cheryl DeStefano of Elkton, Md. There are two brothers, Charles Carter and wife Jean of Towson, Md., Gordon Carter and Sharon, his wife, from the Chicago area, and a sister Jane Moyer and her husband Paul of Gilbertsville, Pa. There are eight grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
On March 1, 2006, KENNETH RAY, retired Chief Warrant Officer 3 U.S. Army of Westminster devoted husband of Joyce "Jo" Harp (nee Fridinger), father of Michael Chrest, Mark Chrest and wife Dori, Bernadette C. Harp and Holly R. Limerick and husband Dwayne, brother of Sandra Knowles and husband Frank, Dianne Hill and husband Robert, Dan B. Harp, Jr., brother-in-law of Judy and Henry Dodrer and Jean and Ron Jones, grandfather of Ashlie Warner, Meagan, Kirsten,...
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2003
Doris Dunker was a fledgling poet growing up in Baltimore when she discovered the whimsical verses of Baltimore's Ogden Nash. His style has had a lifelong influence on her poetry. Now, the Severna Park grandmother has a book of her own, That Cat Book, a collection of illustrated light verse that began life as a children's book and is beginning to catch on with cat lovers of all ages. "We've always had cats," says Dunker, who has a calico named Haley and a tabby named Jaguar. "They're so fascinating.
NEWS
November 28, 2002
Sister Kathleen Mary, 90, grammar school principal Sister Kathleen Mary O'Keeffe, a Franciscan nun and former grammar school principal, died Saturday of respiratory disease at Assisi House, her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 90. She was a teacher and principal at St. Stephen Parochial School in Bradshaw from 1946 to 1950, and again from 1962 to 1964. She began her career in 1928 at SS. Philip and James in Charles Village and later taught at St. Peter Claver School in West Baltimore and Shrine of the Little Flower in Belair-Edison.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | December 23, 2001
Tour guide with a pedigree A MEMORABLE PLACE Steve Luckman, SPECIAL TO THE SUN Southwest Ireland is a land of ancient history and staggering beauty, but its charm has been worn thin by ever-present hordes of foreign tourists. During our two-week tour, my wife, Ellen, and I observed that at every stop our tour van made, we had to fight for a parking space among the herds of buses. It was mostly in our free time during the tour, when we could wander away and walk through the neighborhoods of Blarney, Cork, Limerick and Killarney, that we got to see more of Ireland.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 2, 1994
Thor loped into the room, removed a gigantic leather sap from his rear pocket and sat down on the couch with a thud."I hate it when they talk back," he said. "It just makes it worse for them."Moe nodded his agreement and slipped brass knuckles off a fist the size of a country ham. "They bring it on themselves," he said. "We are not to blame."Thor and Moe are the two broken-nose enforcers who live in a meat locker on the second floor of the Sun building. They are ambassadors of goodwill.What was it today?
NEWS
By Sandy Bauers and Sandy Bauers,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 30, 2000
EAST COVENTRY, Pa. - The tiny hamlet of Frick's Lock - named for the farmer who settled it and the canal locks later built there - lies vacant and abandoned today. The canal that brought it life and prosperity is filled with dirt. Yet its heyday was not so long ago that old-timers and others around here can't still hear the echoes. It was a time when boats laden with coal - as much as a million tons a year - came through the town on their way to Philadelphia. Mules trudged the towpath, pulling the boats and urged on by a colorful, ever-changing cast of boatmen who swore and drank.
NEWS
By Sandy Bauers and Sandy Bauers,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 30, 2000
EAST COVENTRY, Pa. - The tiny hamlet of Frick's Lock - named for the farmer who settled it and the canal locks later built there - lies vacant and abandoned today. The canal that brought it life and prosperity is filled with dirt. Yet its heyday was not so long ago that old-timers and others around here can't still hear the echoes. It was a time when boats laden with coal - as much as a million tons a year - came through the town on their way to Philadelphia. Mules trudged the towpath, pulling the boats and urged on by a colorful, ever-changing cast of boatmen who swore and drank.
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