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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 1, 1992
One of the most commonly used prenatal tests for genetic defects -- CVS -- may itself cause defects in a baby's limbs, according to a study being published today.The study said 1 percent of CVS-tested babies at a Chicago hospital were born with such defects as missing toes, fingers and fingernails. The finding prompted the federal government to call a special meeting last month of international birth defect experts.Although the experts have made no recommendation as yet, several are suggesting that pregnant women be informed about limb abnormalities reported in the last year in CVS-tested babies in Chicago and elsewhere.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Chandler Crews sat on a bench outside of Sinai Hospital in Baltimore one recent day, put her feet on the ground and grinned. Sitting this way was impossible for the 20-year-old from Arkansas just a few years ago because she was born with achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism in which limbs don't grow in proportion with the torso. With bowed legs and a 3-foot-10-inch stature, she said she was unable to do many such "normal" things. She couldn't drive the family car or go for much of a walk without back and joint pain or even wash her hands in most sinks.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN REPORTER | April 17, 2007
The backswing of an unusual spring nor'easter that dumped 3 to 5 inches of rain Sunday buffeted Maryland again yesterday - this time with high winds that snapped trees and power lines, cutting service at one point to more than 60,000 electricity customers and forcing some schools to close. The storm slowly spun up the coast yesterday but stalled over Long Island, kicking back to Maryland steady winds of 25 mph to 30 mph for most of the day and gusts clocked at 50 mph to 60 mph, said meteorologist Steven Zubrick of the National Weather Service office in Sterling, Va. "This is the same system that's responsible for the rain, and it has extremely low pressure, which means high winds," Zubrick said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Some of the more than 170,000 power outages caused by a thick glaze of ice across the state Wednesday might not be repaired until Friday, utility officials said, prompting leaders in two counties to open shelters at schools that were closed for the day because of slick roads strewn with tree limbs. Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. officials said the ice was impeding power restoration efforts but they expect to have most customers' electricity back on by Thursday evening. Freezing rain, falling on top of snow and sleet in some areas, laid down a coat of up to a half-inch of ice in parts of Carroll County and a quarter-inch closer to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2005
It's only a few minutes after David Neufville has gotten to work, and he is already 25 feet in the air, shimmying up an enormous ash tree whose overgrown limbs are scraping the shingles atop a two-story home on a Columbia cul-de-sac. He climbs from branch to branch, methodically looping the rope that is around his waist to the tree's ever higher limbs and pulling himself up like a mountain climber headed toward the next peak. Secured to his belt is a handsaw on one side and a gassed-up chain saw on the other, the tools of his trade - what he calls "health care for trees," what his co-workers call "tree climbing" and what could be called extreme manicuring.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Some of the more than 170,000 power outages caused by a thick glaze of ice across the state Wednesday might not be repaired until Friday, utility officials said, prompting leaders in two counties to open shelters at schools that were closed for the day because of slick roads strewn with tree limbs. Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. officials said the ice was impeding power restoration efforts but they expect to have most customers' electricity back on by Thursday evening. Freezing rain, falling on top of snow and sleet in some areas, laid down a coat of up to a half-inch of ice in parts of Carroll County and a quarter-inch closer to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and James Bock and Douglas Birch and James Bock,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
For Beatriz Lopez-Perez, who was born without arms, her new mechanical limbs are a testament to her faith.After almost two years of fittings and exhausting physical therapy at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the thalidomide victim, a native of Spain's Canary Islands, finally has received her prosthesis.In the meantime, she learned to speak English. She taught herself to live independently. She shrugged off the stares and buried her resentment at slights. And she labored to help a young man from Spain, a double-amputee, come to Hopkins for a new pair of arms of his own.Ms.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
Researchers digging along a rural Pennsylvania highway have unearthed what they say is the world's oldest known arm bone, once used by a slithery creature to raise itself up out of a prehistoric swamp. "We're looking at our very distant ancestor," said Neil Shubin, a professor of organismal biology at the University of Chicago who worked on the discovery. The bone formed the upper arm of an animal about 3 feet long that looked like a flat-headed salamander and lurked in swamps and shallow waters 365 million years ago. Lodged in a geological formation exposed by highway construction a decade ago, the bone will help scientists determine what kinds of aquatic creatures first ventured out of the primordial ooze to form the roots of our family tree.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson | August 31, 2011
During the Irene aftermath, some non-functioning stoplights have kept the pace slower at some intersections. Yes, they've caused traffic backups, but slower speeds and drivers trying to be a little more aware have been a welcomed change of routine. The tree down in the middle of our street functioned as an inverted speed hump. Normally, drivers race down the first block of Ridgewood and take the curve as if they're driving in Monte Carlo. When they tried to do that this week, two maple limbs sent them screeching to a halt right before the bend.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | June 13, 2001
What's for dinner? Fruit, leaves, and insects are on their dinner plate! Tree Top Travelers Diana monkeys are arboreal (this means they live in the tree tops). They have developed strong hind limbs and a long tail which helps them maintain balance high above the forest floor. WILD FACTS Do you know? Does the diana monkey walk on two legs? Answer: No, they move through the forest on all four limbs. Learn more! Visit the diana monkey at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "Monkey Do!" by Allan Ahlberg.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
University System of Maryland officials are considering stiffening the penalties for college fraternities whose initiation rites cross the line from good-natured teasing to hazing that threatens life and limb. Pledging to join a campus fraternity or sorority has always involved a certain amount of ritualized torment for those who would cross the burning sands to full membership. Mostly it's all in good fun. But the merriment is apt to fade quickly if the antics lead to someone being seriously injured or killed or leave lasting psychological scars.
ENTERTAINMENT
Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
We start tonight with Katie's arrival at Redemption Island, where Tina is considering throwing the challenge so that Katie can get back in the game. Have they forgotten about Laura? Because with her track record at challenges, chances are that it's Laura who will get back in the game. Back at camp, Tyson is happy that his "Hail Mary" play worked, but sad that it didn't work well enough to get rid of Tyson. He hopes that Ciera will stick with him, because he's definitely sticking with her. Tyson, Gervase and Monica talk about their next step; according to Tyson, Monica can't stop talking about it. She's annoying him to the point where he tells her that he has the hidden Immunity Idol, just to shut her up. Ciera is feeling good about making her move, even if it doesn't end up working out for her. She knows that her only other option would be coming in fourth.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Striding in her special black walking shoes decorated with turquoise, pink and lime-green squares, 8-year-old Elizabeth Gardner was, literally, on her way to reaching a milestone. As she began the Save-A-Limb Ride's 1-mile family walk Saturday morning, Lizzie, as she is called by her family and friends, had to urge her grandfather to keep up. "C'mon, Pop-Pop!" she called. Lizzie was born with a rare genetic disorder known as TAR syndrome (TAR stands for "thrombocytopenia with absent radius")
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
After two days of heavy sedation, Erika Brannock awoke Wednesday morning in her hospital bed to dramatic and gruesome news: Her left leg had been amputated below the knee, the only medical option for a team of surgeons handling traumatic injuries from the Boston Marathon bombings. The 29-year-old Towson preschool teacher took the news with courage, relatives said. Then, unable to speak because of a ventilator tube, she wrote out a simple message: She wanted to see photos of her students.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 14, 2013
The exhibit "Arcane Convergence" brings together two artists whose shared abstract orientation merits the show's title. Fortunately, Linda Trope and Adam Zynger both create artwork that is easy to approach at the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House. Trope's mixed media works on paper actually do incorporate representational figures and recognizable landscapes, but they're so spare and stylized that you should not expect anything specific by way of biography and geography. Instead, you'll constantly encounter lithe dancers whose gently curving bodies and limbs are painted with such zestfully assertive colors as pink and purple.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Baltimore police are investigating two shootings from Tuesday night that injured three victims. At 5:50 p.m., officers responded to calls of gunshots at N. Caroline and E. Fayette streets near Washington Hill. Arriving on the scene, they found a 20-year-old man in a car who had been shot several times in his limbs. Police soon received another report of a victim, a 40-year-old man they found nearby in the 200 block of Dallas Court. He was suffering a gunshot wound to a limb. Paramedics took both victims to an area hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries.
NEWS
By Maria Garriott | November 23, 1992
''Our children are being damaged in ways we don't even know about yet. In my own community, I see more helicopters flying around with searchlights than I ever saw in Vietnam.''--George Buntin, executive director, Baltimore NAACPAgain,I lie awake.Outside,I hear loud voices,gunshots, screams.Men run through the alley,laughing.Another pursues,cursing.Fools, I fume.They play, butlife is snatched awaywith the speed of a bullet.I circle through the bedroomstouching each childpulling flimsy coversover fragile limbsremembering the God Of Danielin the lion's den.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | March 24, 2007
I have to rethink my garden because of deer damage. What shrubs won't deer eat? There are no guarantees. Where deer populations are very high, they eat just about anything. Usually American holly, osmanthus, viburnums, caryopteris, rose of Sharon, butterfly bush, sweet box, Oregon grape holly, red osier dogwood and boxwood are reliable survivors. Many plants do well once they're established, if protected by fencing or repellents when small and tender. Resist planting barberry or other nonnative invasive plants.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Kevin Gipson spent his final day advocating for friends as they fought to stay at a homeless camp under the Jones Falls Expressway. The next morning, police found him dead in what they believe to be an unrelated incident. Once a resident of the small shantytown of tents between the northbound JFX and the Fallsway, Gipson, 43, had spoken to The Baltimore Sun Friday about the city's plans to raze the encampment. He said he had moved into a Park Heights medical facility but had left his tent behind for friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
A Johns Hopkins brain scientist is finding a neurological basis for a notion that many people believe intuitively - that music is as much a form of language as Spanish or French. Charles Limb is one of just a handful of researchers worldwide studying what's going on in the brains of jazz musicians who compose on the fly. Some findings related to traditional language areas of the brain are what Limb expected to discover, though one key and recent result has surprised even him. But he's hoping that what he's learning may apply to creative activity and problem-solving of all sorts - whether writing a novel, designing a better mousetrap or devising a mathematical proof.
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