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By Edward Lee | January 2, 2012
The return of Billy Cundiff was bonus for Ravens fans who watched the kicker contribute to the team's 24-16 victory over the Cincinnati Bengals. But it may also signal the end of Shayne Graham's tenure with the team. Graham was signed to the roster Dec. 21 as Cundiff was hobbled by his sore left calf. Graham converted two field goals and two extra points in the Christmas Eve win against the Cleveland Browns, but coach John Harbaugh said the team would not carry two kickers if Cundiff was healthy.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
The project seemed simple enough - build a waste-to-energy plant on the Eastern Shore fueled by poultry manure, keeping it from flushing into and polluting the bay, while creating green jobs and boosting Maryland's fledgling renewable energy industry But 18 months after it was heralded by Gov. Martin O'Malley, the $75 million project has been stymied after prospective sites and a potential partnership fell through. Now state officials are weighing giving Green Planet Power Solutions, the California-based company chosen to build the 13.4-megawatt plant, a nearly $35 million subsidy on top of what the state previously agreed to pay for its power.
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SPORTS
March 6, 2006
The Raiders had all but parted ways with quarterback Kerry Collins last night, but the postponement of free agency keeps the likely Ravens target off the market for now. PG 4D
NEWS
April 29, 2014
The continued existence of Maryland's death row a year after the General Assembly abolished capital punishment was brought into question by two events this month, one obvious and one less so. The first is the death, apparently of natural causes, of one of the five inmates put in limbo after the death penalty repeal, John Booth-el. As a result, advocates are renewing their questions about whether it would be appropriate for Maryland to go forward with executions now that the legislature has found the death penalty inappropriate.
SPORTS
By Matt Castello | June 14, 2011
Walter Sanders is a prime example of someone you may not expect to be affected by the NFL lockout. The Baltimore native is not a current player or coach, nor does he work for a team’s front office. Instead, Sanders is one of the numerous players who did not hear his name called during April's draft. He is a free agent in a world without free agency. For those who saw "Inception," he’s pretty much stuck in the NFL version of limbo. Sanders, a former three-sport standout at Mervo, continued his football career at St. Augustine’s College in Raleigh, N.C. The 5-foot-9 running back left St. Augustine’s with the school’s career rushing record and became the Falcons’ first 1,000-yard season rusher in the modern era last year.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 25, 1990
As of this morning, some people who have bought U.S. Treasury bills will discover that their money has entered a sort of interest-free limbo.For the moment, the Treasury lacks authority to borrow money, a legacy of the budget gridlock in Washington.Most people who hold Treasury bills will not be affected, bank officials said yesterday.The government has enough cash to pay back investors who bought the series of Treasury bills issued 13 weeks and 26 weeks ago, both of which mature today. But some have signed up to roll over their T-bills.
NEWS
March 25, 1991
People charged with a crime have a constitutional right to a speedy trial. Children in foster care who are awaiting adoption have no assurance that their cases will not languish in the courts for months and even years. In 1986, for foster children in Maryland, the adoption process took an average of 69 months -- almost six years. Thanks in part to legislation speeding up some parts of the process, the average wait is now down to four years. That's an improvement, but it is still shamefully long for a child's fate to be held in limbo.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
Caught somewhere between courtroom acrimony and a forced truce in the NFL's labor dispute, Ravens wide receiver Derrick Mason celebrated the players' legal victory with a workout and a word of caution Tuesday. "We're still kind of in limbo because the owners want to appeal," the veteran wide receiver said. "Before we bring out the trumpets and the banners, we've got to see what the 8th Circuit Court will have to say. We're confident, but we still understand it can change in the blink of an eye. " The NFL players' trade association, formerly the NFL Players Association, scored a major triumph in Minnesota on Monday when U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson lifted the six-week NFL lockout of its workforce.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 2, 1999
Director John Sayles builds an exquisite sense of tension in "Limbo," a potent story of intimacy, risk and desperation set in contemporary Alaska.Sayles' detractors will find many of the same shortcomings as they have in previous films: "Limbo" is talky at times, and some of its plotting is contrived. But for his admirers, Sayles' 12th film will prove to be another fascinating exploration of such themes as: the relationship between people and their environment, the ecology of communities and, above all, the power of narrative to give shape and sense to experience.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Today was supposed to be a day of celebration at The Warehouse, with the Orioles ushering in their new closer, Grant Balfour, who agreed to a two-year, $15 million deal earlier this week. But the news conference won't happen. The deal is teetering and likely to collapse -- or, at the very least, change dramatically -- because of an issue with Balfour's right shoulder found during his physical, according to industry sources . Because the Orioles in the past have had issues with agreed-to deals once they get to the physical stage -- Aaron Sele, Xavier Hernandez, and, just last year, Jair Jurrjens, to name a few -- there's going to be an underlying sense that this is the Orioles' fault.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Theo Jones is set to graduate from Sojourner-Douglass College with a nursing degree in November, but instead of celebrating as he nears the finish line, he's left wondering if he should transfer to another school. Sojourner-Douglass was ordered this month by its accrediting body to "show cause" or prove why it should not lose its accreditation, and Jones is one of the many students who are deeply worried about their futures. Jones said he's made inquiries to five potential employers in recent weeks, and all have asked him about the school's accreditation status.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - As the sun rises this morning, the Orioles still haven't announced their signing of South Korean pitcher Suk-min Yoon. At this point, the plan is still to introduce Yoon to the media Monday, but I've heard that the right-hander is hoping to hear this morning that he cleared his Friday physical and can begin working out with the team today. He's eager to start his transition to the major leagues and American baseball. We will see. But at this point, provided he passed the physical, we know he plans to stay here in Sarasota and get his work visa through Canada instead of going back to South Korea.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
The Maryland Senate approved an emergency plan Tuesday designed to help people stuck without insurance because of the state's glitch-ridden health exchange. Lawmakers vowed inquiries will continue into what went wrong. The emergency proposal, which now moves to the House of Delegates, would allow people to sign up for the state's high-risk insurance program that was supposed to end when the Affordable Care Act took effect. The coverage would be retroactive to Jan. 1. State officials estimate that as many as 5,000 people who tried without success to buy policies online may seek coverage through the legislation. The four companies that sell policies through the exchange also agreed to allow people to sign up for retroactive coverage dating back to Jan. 1 if they signed up for coverage by 5 p.m. Tuesday.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Today was supposed to be a day of celebration at The Warehouse, with the Orioles ushering in their new closer, Grant Balfour, who agreed to a two-year, $15 million deal earlier this week. But the news conference won't happen. The deal is teetering and likely to collapse -- or, at the very least, change dramatically -- because of an issue with Balfour's right shoulder found during his physical, according to industry sources . Because the Orioles in the past have had issues with agreed-to deals once they get to the physical stage -- Aaron Sele, Xavier Hernandez, and, just last year, Jair Jurrjens, to name a few -- there's going to be an underlying sense that this is the Orioles' fault.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2013
A man with dual citizenship will wait another week in the Irish court system for a decision regarding his extradition on a Maryland arrest warrant, according to multiple Irish media sources ' reports Thursday morning. Meanwhile, the malware attack on Eric Eoin Marques' servers that coincided with his arrest last week may have taken down a tool vital to journalists, dissidents and whistleblowers. According to The Telegraph: So-called 'darknet' services like Tor have a bad name, because they are used to spread pornography and images of child abuse, as well as to sell drugs via sites such as the Silk Road.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
A failure to resolvea scheduling conflict with the Orioles has jeopardized the Ravens' chances of hosting the NFL's 2013regular-season opener, an honor bestowed on the Super Bowl champions for the last decade. The NFL was expected to announce the Ravens' opponent for the Sept. 5 game at this week's league meetings. Instead, league and team officials said Monday that the game's location is in doubt because the Orioles are scheduled to host the Chicago White Sox at 7:05 the same night.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports Contributing to this article were staff members Sandy Banisky, Larry Carson, Meredith Schlow, James M. Coram, Timothy Wheeler and David Michael Ettlin | April 8, 1992
The General Assembly's failure to agree on a fiscal 1993 budget has left local government leaders across Maryland in limbo -- work on their own budgets is frozen by uncertainty over the size of the hit they will take from the state government.The worst-case scenario is a "doomsday" budget cutback. The last version the legislature considered would hack $95 million in local aid, on top of $250 million cut already. It would leave local leaders deciding between hefty property tax increases, drastic service cuts and layoffs.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | May 27, 2007
We cannot underestimate the importance of trimming trees to prevent injury. I'm not speaking about decorating Christmas trees, although I did once experience some discomfort when a fully trimmed Christmas tree toppled over on me. But such a trimmed-tree incident was nothing compared with the untrimmed one that nearly felled me last week. Those of us who like to walk or jog through our neighborhoods truly appreciate those of you who trim the limbs of your trees -- the ones that line the sidewalks -- to an above-the-average-head-height level.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Orioles right-hander Jair Jurrjens, signed to a minor league contract Friday evening, joined spring training camp this morning for the team's first full squad workout of the spring. Jurrjens, who initially agreed to a major league deal worth $1.5 million pending a physical, settled for a minor league contract with spring training invite when his physical raised health concerns. “There's no hard feelings,” Jurrjens said before Saturday's workout. “That's part of the business.” Jurrjens will compete for a rotation spot, but since he's signed to a minor league contract, the team could easily send him to Triple-A Norfolk.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Maryland's highest court handed a victory to same-sex couples Friday in a ruling that the governor and other advocates hailed as an endorsement of administration policies recognizing gay marriages performed in other states. "To treat families differently under the law because they happen to be led by gay or lesbian couples is not right or just," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement. "Today's decision is another step forward in our efforts to ensure that every child is protected equally under the law. " However, the ruling, in a case over whether Maryland courts could grant divorces to same-sex spouses, met with skepticism from groups fighting a recently passed state law legalizing gay nuptials.
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