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Lillian Hellman

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By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | June 16, 1996
In general it is imprudent to write critically about the work of people whom you know well, and Joan Mellen and I have been friends for something like 20 years. I would leave her 13th book to others to judge here, except that the subject fascinates me and - more - there is something happening in and around it that is irresistible.The work is "Hellman and Hammett, The Legendary Passion of Lillian Hellman and Dashiell Hammett" (HarperCollins. 572 pages. $32).Hellman, of course, was a playwright ("The Little Foxes," "Watch on the Rhine")
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 14, 2007
The magnificent Atonement, like Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour, depicts what Hellman called "the power of a lie." Then it ripples into a panorama that encompasses so much more. The meanness that ruins innocents and tears families apart seems to flow from the same evil that erupts into World War II. Yet through unexpected and cathartic twists, this movie leaves you with atonement and redemption. The key action takes place during a single day in 1935. On a British estate, the crush of 13-year-old Briony Tallis (Saoirse Ronan)
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NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2005
Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour has held the stage for 70 years because of its vivid illustration of an unfortunate fact: Malicious gossip can destroy people's lives. Donald Hicken's powerful production of the drama is being presented by Rep Stage in a joint production with Everyman Theatre and Baltimore School for the Arts. Set in the 1930s, "The Children's Hour" takes place in a girls' school run by two longtime friends, Karen Wright and Martha Dobie. The pupils come from prosperous families, and as the play opens these young ladies are seen taking part in an elocution class taught by Martha's Aunt Lily.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2005
Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour has held the stage for 70 years because of its vivid illustration of an unfortunate fact: Malicious gossip can destroy people's lives. Donald Hicken's powerful production of the drama is being presented by Rep Stage in a joint production with Everyman Theatre and Baltimore School for the Arts. Set in the 1930s, "The Children's Hour" takes place in a girls' school run by two longtime friends, Karen Wright and Martha Dobie. The pupils come from prosperous families, and as the play opens these young ladies are seen taking part in an elocution class taught by Martha's Aunt Lily.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 14, 2007
The magnificent Atonement, like Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour, depicts what Hellman called "the power of a lie." Then it ripples into a panorama that encompasses so much more. The meanness that ruins innocents and tears families apart seems to flow from the same evil that erupts into World War II. Yet through unexpected and cathartic twists, this movie leaves you with atonement and redemption. The key action takes place during a single day in 1935. On a British estate, the crush of 13-year-old Briony Tallis (Saoirse Ronan)
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | February 28, 1994
Chicago. -- There are statements that go down in history even if they seem to be quixotic verbal gestures at the time. I think, for instance, of Joseph Welch's question of Joseph McCarthy: ''At long last, have you left no sense of decency?'' Or Lillian Hellman's statement to the House Un-American Activities Committee: ''I cannot and will not cut my conscience to fit this year's fashions.'' These few words live on because they put large events in the sharpest kind of moral focus.We can add another sentence to that list of catalytic verbal agents, Harry Blackmun's words in the Supreme Court's refusal to review a death-penalty case.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 15, 1996
Antediluvian tomes, they keep on coming: yet another biography of Bertrand Russell, in two volumes, two more Lord Byrons scuffling in the wings, this Edna St. Vincent Millay, or that, Eleanor Roosevelt ad infinitum. Even if, as is increasingly unlikely, significant treasures of new documentation were to appear justifying the repetitions, the biography slaughterhouse might do well to pause.In fact, the appetites of editors for the biographical enterprise have cooled even as the high price of production has driven up prices and made sales infinitesimal; Barnes and Noble quietly removed its separate section devoted to biography in response to poor sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 6, 2001
`Watch on the Rhine' opens at Everyman Everyman Theatre opens its 11th season tonight with Lillian Hellman's 1941 drama, Watch on the Rhine. The Nazi threat hits home when Sara Muller and her German, anti-Fascist husband seek refuge with Sara's mother, who lives just outside Washington. Tana Hicken, who played Sara in Center Stage's 1980 production, now plays the mother. Deborah Hazlett and Bruce Nelson co-star. Direction is by Donald Hicken, head of the theater department at the Baltimore School for the Arts (and Tana's husband)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | August 1, 1996
Though rarely produced, Marc Blitzstein's "Regina" (1949) is considered one of the most significant musical dramatic works of the last 50 years. Blitzstein's pioneering use of American vernacular speech settings in 1949 enormously influenced the Broadway musicals of his friends Leonard Bernstein, Frank Loesser and Stephen Sondheim.Baltimoreans will get a chance to hear "Regina" -- a setting of Lillian Hellman's savage play of the same name -- when the Baltimore Opera Company presents the work tonight at 8, Saturday at 8: 30 p.m. and Sunday at 6 p.m. at the Peggy and Yale Gordon Center for Performing Arts in Owings Mills.
FEATURES
May 10, 2001
The Late Show with David Letterman. Audition for stupid human and stupid pet tricks noon-3 p.m. May 19 at WJZ TV, 3725 Malden St. To schedule appointment or for more details, call 212-975-4879. Everyman Theatre. Open auditions, by appointment only, for Equity and non-union actors for the 2001-2002 season. 3 p.m.-9 p.m. May 21 and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. May 25 at the theater, 1727 N. Charles St. All roles open. For appointment, Equity actors should call 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday and Equity and non-union actors should call 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 15, 1996
Antediluvian tomes, they keep on coming: yet another biography of Bertrand Russell, in two volumes, two more Lord Byrons scuffling in the wings, this Edna St. Vincent Millay, or that, Eleanor Roosevelt ad infinitum. Even if, as is increasingly unlikely, significant treasures of new documentation were to appear justifying the repetitions, the biography slaughterhouse might do well to pause.In fact, the appetites of editors for the biographical enterprise have cooled even as the high price of production has driven up prices and made sales infinitesimal; Barnes and Noble quietly removed its separate section devoted to biography in response to poor sales.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | June 16, 1996
In general it is imprudent to write critically about the work of people whom you know well, and Joan Mellen and I have been friends for something like 20 years. I would leave her 13th book to others to judge here, except that the subject fascinates me and - more - there is something happening in and around it that is irresistible.The work is "Hellman and Hammett, The Legendary Passion of Lillian Hellman and Dashiell Hammett" (HarperCollins. 572 pages. $32).Hellman, of course, was a playwright ("The Little Foxes," "Watch on the Rhine")
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | February 28, 1994
Chicago. -- There are statements that go down in history even if they seem to be quixotic verbal gestures at the time. I think, for instance, of Joseph Welch's question of Joseph McCarthy: ''At long last, have you left no sense of decency?'' Or Lillian Hellman's statement to the House Un-American Activities Committee: ''I cannot and will not cut my conscience to fit this year's fashions.'' These few words live on because they put large events in the sharpest kind of moral focus.We can add another sentence to that list of catalytic verbal agents, Harry Blackmun's words in the Supreme Court's refusal to review a death-penalty case.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 19, 2001
Experts agree that to enjoy our retirement years more fully, we should stay busy and explore new horizons. One delightful and inexpensive way to do both is through a fascinating theater appreciation course at Arnold Senior Center. Part of Anne Arundel Community College's Continuing Education Program that offers courses on campus and at senior centers, the 10-week class in the spring proved to be so interesting that I registered for the eight-week summer session that began yesterday. As an arts reviewer, I'm familiar with most of the playwrights and many of the plays discussed, and yet I was able to discover new meanings and rekindle excitement during each session.
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