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By Peter Schmuck | January 13, 2010
T ime is running out. I've got only a few more days to get over my man-crush on Peyton Manning. It won't be easy. Even during his perfunctory conference call with the media Tuesday, I found myself wondering how anyone can pack so much smart and charming and successful into one human body. And he didn't really say anything all that interesting. "It's going to be a tough game here in Indy on Saturday," he said. "We know that, but it'll be two really good teams playing against each other."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Some restaurants have, apart from everything else, a likable quality. Diners pull for it and want it do well. On a recent Saturday night, the Grille at Maple Lawn was full, early-evening diners were smiling and there was the hum of general contentment in the air. All of the basic ingredients are in place. There's a warm, energetic atmosphere, a hospitable staff, and an appealing, accessible menu that easily mixes American and Mediterranean dishes - "Ameriterranean cuisine and beyond," is how the Grille puts it. You can get a filet mignon, if you like, or paella, a house specialty.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 1997
An article in yesterday's edition of The Sun in Anne Arundel incorrectly stated the plot of "Rumors," the Neil Simon play in production at Colonial Players on East Street in Annapolis.In the play, the deputy mayor of New York shoots himself in the ear.The Sun regrets the error.As one of America's most successful and prolific playwrights, Neil Simon has given us enduring characters in believable situations. But likable characters need not apply for "Rumors," a Neil Simon farce that ridicules the self-absorbed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 3, 2013
The 1700 block of North Charles Street, home to such institutions as the Club Charles and Charles Theater, is a logical home for a place like Lost City Diner. Its quirky atmosphere, friendly service and likable (if sometimes average) food are likely to make it a hit. The restaurant opened in August 2011 but closed only a few months later, in January 2012, for "kitchen renovations. " It finally reopened, with a new owner, on April first of this year. On a recent Wednesday evening, the diner was nearly empty at 6:30, but packed by 7:30.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 12, 2008
A year ago, the New England Patriots suffered a black eye over Spygate, admitting to having broken NFL rules in their zeal to scout opposing teams. It was a national embarrassment to the organization, and owner Bob Kraft wound up apologizing to his fellow owners. However, this year, the Patriots are coming out of the gate as a franchise doing something entirely admirable. Today, the Patriots, along with the Federal Reserve, are holding a giant mortgage consultation at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Mass.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2007
Ronald Cuffie chuckled at the thought of Baltimoreans lining up this weekend to see Ratatouille, the new animated film about a rat in Paris who's an expert chef. Surely some of the city's moviegoers are responsible for the 25,000 service requests made each year to the city's "Rat Rubout" program, which removes the repulsive vermin from infested neighborhoods. "In the movies, rats are likable characters," said Cuffie, director of the city's vector control initiative. "In real life, people want to drop a brick on them."
NEWS
October 27, 2000
DEMOCRAT AL GORE and Republican George W. Bush have made us a lot of fancy promises, but what do they ask of us? What great crusade or cause do they project upon the screen of national destiny? For what grand purpose are we being summoned to the ballot box Nov. 7? Neither of these guys has been strong on "the vision thing." And this has been a race that has underwhelmed -- boiling down, essentially, to who's more "likable" -- even as it remains close and hard fought. Both candidates are too cautious, too careful and too disciplined to give us the kind of excitement that would stimulate real interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 8, 2004
Thanks to the MTV reality show Newlyweds: Nick and Jessica, Nick Lachey has become a guy you want to like. His role as the harried, good-natured husband of Jessica Simpson practically earns him sainthood status, not just because of his patience but also because he transmits a persona that is hard-working and genuine. His solo debut, the irksomely titled SoulO, is much like the man on TV: uncomplicated but likable -- characteristics, unfortunately, that don't play as well on disc as they do on TV. SoulO lacks the kind of fire that makes you crave the sound of it again and again.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 13, 2005
IT IS WRONG to say Tiger Woods was more likable than usual in winning the 2005 Masters. As one of the world's most popular athletes, he obviously was already immensely likable. But before the most recent of his nine major tournament victories, he was popular primarily because of what he did, not who he was. He was a ruthless competitor, a once-in-a-lifetime athlete, and people loved him more for his talent and accomplishments than his personality. In winning the 2005 Masters, however, Woods was more sympathetic, human and adult.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | January 2, 1994
When Tom Hanks played a caustic, unlovable stand-up comic in the movie "Punchline," some fans worried that the actor might hurt his good-guy image and, in the process, kill his career.Of course, they said the same thing after "The Bonfire of the Vanities," but that's another story.Well, here he goes again in "Philadelphia." This is his most courageous and challenging movie role, and fans and critics are divided on how he will fare.People are not sure whether the role will ruin his career or win him an Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 26, 2011
Usually, rude people aren't well-liked. They're not popular. They don't get elected president of their college's student government association, let alone governor of a densely populated state.  But somehow with the current governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie, his rudeness comes across, perplexingly, as a kind of awesome.  I first became aware of Christie's no-nonsense talk when he was conducting heated town hall meetings across New...
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | January 13, 2010
T ime is running out. I've got only a few more days to get over my man-crush on Peyton Manning. It won't be easy. Even during his perfunctory conference call with the media Tuesday, I found myself wondering how anyone can pack so much smart and charming and successful into one human body. And he didn't really say anything all that interesting. "It's going to be a tough game here in Indy on Saturday," he said. "We know that, but it'll be two really good teams playing against each other."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | November 6, 2009
Even before the undead yet live-wire comedy-horror hit "Zombieland," Jesse Eisenberg had established a beachhead as the thinking man's Michael Cera: slender and sensitive but also emotionally tough and sinewy. In "The Squid and the Whale," playing the older adolescent son of an estranged intellectual couple, and in "Adventureland," playing a recent college grad and aspiring travel writer, spinning his wheels and falling in love at a summer job in an amusement park, Eisenberg was equally potent playing fecklessness or sincerity, and better yet when he played both at the same time.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 20, 2009
I Love You, Man is a funny film about discomfort that would be funnier if it dared to knock the audience out of its comfort zone. It's ostensibly about the differences between close male friends and tribal buddies as well as the gap between men and their wives and lovers. But it's mostly about the canny confectionary skills that go into making a smash sitcomlike farce. It's like a Judd Apatow comedy given the unyielding pace and invariably neat wrap-up of a '90s hit like Friends. At one point, the script riffs on the HBO ad line, "It's not TV, it's HBO."
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 12, 2008
A year ago, the New England Patriots suffered a black eye over Spygate, admitting to having broken NFL rules in their zeal to scout opposing teams. It was a national embarrassment to the organization, and owner Bob Kraft wound up apologizing to his fellow owners. However, this year, the Patriots are coming out of the gate as a franchise doing something entirely admirable. Today, the Patriots, along with the Federal Reserve, are holding a giant mortgage consultation at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Mass.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2007
Ronald Cuffie chuckled at the thought of Baltimoreans lining up this weekend to see Ratatouille, the new animated film about a rat in Paris who's an expert chef. Surely some of the city's moviegoers are responsible for the 25,000 service requests made each year to the city's "Rat Rubout" program, which removes the repulsive vermin from infested neighborhoods. "In the movies, rats are likable characters," said Cuffie, director of the city's vector control initiative. "In real life, people want to drop a brick on them."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Staff Writer | October 17, 1992
EDISON, N.J. -- Dorothy Avallone discovered her fondness for President Bush was fading recently when she suddenly realized that she was irritated by his voice.Mrs. Avallone is the Republican mayor of the Republican-voting township of Freehold in Republican Monmouth County, N.J. She is a GOP believer and a Bush fan. She is still predicting that, despite polls to the contrary, New Jersey will not abandon its Republican tradition to help give Democrat Bill Clinton a landslide.But she felt herself being caught up in a national mood swing in which voters could be getting ready to unseat the man who last year was the most popular president in history.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 17, 1991
HOME Improvement" has the funniest pilot of the new TV season, but its time period could squelch a few laughs in future episodes.This new ABC show, which premieres tonight at 8:30 on Channel 13 (WJZ), is a showcase for comedian Tim Allen, whose stand-up routine focuses on the odd relationship between masculinity and power tools."Home Improvement" gives Allen's character of Tim Taylor his own home fix-up show in which he gets to dispense handyman wisdom and do-it-yourself tips.Then the cameras follow Taylor home where his desire to re-create the world along the lines of his ridiculous macho vision run afoul, not only of the laws of physics and gravity, but also of his wife Jill, who is quick with the ego-deflating line.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Anica Butler and Andrea F. Siegel and Anica Butler,Sun reporters | September 30, 2006
A quiet but sociable dentist, Albert Woonho Ro enjoyed his family, golf and religious worship. This week, he was found beaten to death in his Glen Burnie office, devastating his family, stunning the Korean community and setting his neighbors in the complex on edge. Preparing for the funeral today, Michael Ro, a doctor, said he has no idea why his brother met such a violent death. "That is why I hope the police can find out and help us solve the mystery. We as a family, we want quick closure to the matter, as to who and how and why. We are still shocked.
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